Yesterday Once More

by Ann Douglas

Caution: This Lesbian Erotic Story contains strong sexual content, including Fa/Fa, Consensual, Lesbian, Fiction, Oral Sex, .

Desc: Lesbian Erotic Story: An unexpected visit from her past turned today into yesterday once more for Dorothy Kerr.

Dorothy Kerr turned her head as her daughter, Cassie, walked into the kitchen. To her disappointment, the soon to be high school graduate still wore the same look of disappointment she had carried around all week.

"I was just making some tea," the thirty-eight year old brunette said, "just the thing for a rainy afternoon. Would you like some?"

"No thanks, Mom," Cassie said as she sat down at the kitchen table.

Taking her tea mug in hand, Dorothy sat down opposite her daughter. She had been trying to come up with a way to cheer her up for the last few days with no success. Deep in her heart she knew her daughter's mood wasn't her fault, but she still felt responsible.

"Could I say I'm sorry one more time," Dorothy said.

"You don't have to, Mom," Cassie replied, "It was my fault, not yours."

"Still, maybe I shouldn't have even brought it up unless I was totally sure," the older woman said.

"No, you told me to keep it to myself and instead I told Janet," Cassie went on. "What was it that Dad used to say, a secret stops being a secret when a third person learns about it. I should've known that Janet couldn't keep her mouth shut."

It had all started two weeks ago when the band hired by the graduating class for the Prom had cancelled their appearance. Two of the members had been injured in an automobile accident and wouldn't be able to play for months. The cancellation had set off a mad scramble to find a replacement group. Not the easiest thing to do with half the proms in the county all being on the same night. At least if you wanted to get a half decent act.

It was then that Dorothy had come up with a suggestion that she thought might make her daughter's Prom truly memorable. Why not, she told her daughter, try and get someone famous to appear in their place.

"Yeah, right," Cassie had laughed, "That kind of thing only happens in the movies."

"You never know," her mother had replied.

"In the movies, it usually involves someone's dying wish or someone knows the star personally," the seventeen year old said. "I don't suppose you know any major stars, do you?"

"Well actually..." Dorothy started to say but was cut off by her daughter.

"And Johnny Brown and the Dreamboats doesn't count," she said, bringing up the name of her uncle's old time rock band which had a state wide following among the over forty crowd.

"Actually," Dorothy said slowly as she debated even mentioning it, "I was thinking more of Kassandra. You have heard of her, right?"

"Shut up," Cassie shot back, "There's no way you know Kassandra."

Kassandra was one of those mega stars that were known the world over by just her first name. She had taken the music world by storm fifteen years earlier and was only eclipsed by the likes of Madonna. It was nearly impossible to get tickets to one of her concerts, much less think she would ever appear at a high school show.

"Yes way," Dorothy smiled, "But when I knew her she still had two names. Back when I was your age and the world was still flat."

"You really know her?" Cassie repeated.

"Yes I do," Dorothy likewise repeated. "There was a time when she was just a small town girl as well. We went to school together back in Fort Bradford."

"You think you could actually get her to come to the Prom?" Cassie asked.

"I can try and ask," Dorothy said. "I's a long shot, but who knows."

"That would be so awesome," Cassie bubbled.

"Remember, this is really a long shot," Dorothy reminded her daughter, "so let's not say a word about it until I can try and make some calls."

"Oh wow, I can't believe my Mom actually knows Kassandra," Cassie was saying to herself, only half hearing the rest of what Dorothy had said.

Of course a secret this good just had to be shared with her best friend, Janet. Then of course Janet had to share it with Connie, promising her to secrecy as well. A promise that Connie made sure to likewise extract from Kathy, and on and on it went. By the end of the weekend, most of the senior class had heard that Kassandra was coming to the Prom. All of this before Dorothy had even been able to call Kassandra's manager on Monday morning.

A call that was having very little success. Despite her being able to call on an unlisted line and asking for Mary Glenn, the pseudonym Kassandra traveled under, the business manager who screened the call refused to put her through to the singer. He said that he had never heard of her before and he had been with the star almost from the beginning.

"It was a good try lady," he said before hanging up the phone.

"Pigheaded ass," Dorothy said as she hung up the phone.

As she had told Cassie, it was a real long shot, but it really annoyed her to get shot down before even getting the chance to even ask her personally. She would've understood if Kassandra couldn't do it. After all, a star of that magnitude had commitments the world over.

It would've been nice to do something really special for Cassie, Dorothy had thought. They'd all had a rough year with the death of her father last August. As much as Dorothy hurt, she had buried it in order to be there in every way she could for her daughter and she hoped she wouldn't be too disappointed. Thankfully no one else even knew she had tried to get the singer.

When Cassie had gone to school that Monday, she'd been shocked to discover that everyone knew about her mother trying to get Kassandra for the Prom. She was then devastated the next day when she had to practically announce that it wasn't going to happen. Despite the fact that she hadn't personally told a single soul other than Janet, a great many people seemed to act as if she had promised the whole class. A few even took the position that her mother had never known the star to begin with, and she had just spread the rumor to make herself popular.

"I hung your Prom dress in your closet," Dorothy said as she got up from the table and turned on the tap to rinse out her glass.

"You know, Mom, I've been thinking," Cassie said from the table. "Maybe I'll just skip the Prom. It's not like..."

"You hold it right there, young lady," Dorothy interrupted. "I don't want to hear any such silly thing. Of course you're going to the Prom, and you're going to have a great time."

"Yeah but," Cassie started to say when she was interrupted by the front door bell. "I'll get it," she said, rising from her chair.

"Not go to the Prom," Dorothy said to herself as she put the now clean cup back in the cabinet. "Just because a few other kids have big mouths..."

Dorothy's train of thought was abruptly shattered as twin sounds cut through the air. A sudden scream in her daughter's voice, and then the sound of a body hitting the floor. A sound Dorothy remembered all too clearly from the night Jimmy had his heart attack.

"Oh My God!" Cassie had screamed, causing her mother to race out of the kitchen towards the front door.

When she reached the foyer, Dorothy saw her daughter stretched out on the floor. Bent down and leaning over her was a woman wearing a dark blue cape and hood. The angle of the hood obscured her face.

"Cassie!" Dorothy screamed, the color draining from her face.

"She's all right," the cloaked woman said as Cassie let out a soft moan. "I think she just fainted for a moment."

"Fainted?" Dorothy repeated as to her relief, Cassie opened her eyes and began to sit up.

"Take it easy, honey," the new arrival said, "Give yourself a chance to catch your breath."

"Oh my God," Cassie said again as she remembered why she had fainted. "Mom, it's really her!"

It was only then that the cloaked woman pulled back her hood, giving Dorothy her first good look at the blond tressed face beneath. A face that was both strange and familiar.

"Cassie?" Dorothy asked in a surprised voice.

"Yes," both her daughter and the woman in blue answered at the same time.

"Your name is Cassie too?" a surprised Cassie asked the woman.

"Yes, short for Cassandra," came her reply. "Back when I used to spell it with a C. Didn't you know that?"

"Why would I know that?" a confused Cassie asked.

"Well after all," Kassandra smiled, "you were named after me."

"Oh my God," Cassie said a third time in a more subdued tone.

Once Cassie was up and off the floor, the three women moved to the kitchen. Dorothy hung up Kassandra's wet cloak and put the tea kettle back on.

"I can't believe that you're really here," Cassie said. "I have like a million things to ask."

"Sweetheart, I'll be more than happy to answer all your questions, but later," Kassandra replied. "If you don't mind, could your mother and I have a few moments. It's been a long time since we've had a chance to talk."

"Oh sure," the excited teenager said as she excused herself and headed up to her room. As she ran up the stairs, she could just about be heard repeating over and over, "She's really here."

Both older women waited until they heard Cassie's bedroom door close behind her. What they had to say to each other wasn't for her ears.

"It's really so good to see you again, Cass," Dorothy said as she smiled at the friend of her younger years. "I think of you often."

"It's good to see you too, DD," Kassandra replied, using the nickname Dorothy had gone by in her high school days. "And before I say anything else, I want to say how deeply sorry I am."

"For what?" Dorothy asked, "That your manager didn't take me seriously when I called. That was hardly your fault."

"No, not that," she replied as Dorothy put a cup of hot tea in front of her. "Although that shouldn't have happened either. I'm so sorry I wasn't here for you when Jim died. I didn't find out until after the funeral and I was on tour in Tokyo and..."

"You don't have to explain, Cass," Dorothy interrupted. "I understood and I really appreciated the letter you send. It meant a lot to me."

"You know I could never talk on the phone if it was something important," the blond said. "In hindsight though, what I really should've done was got on the first plane back to the States and come to see you no matter what."

"That wouldn't have been fair to all the people who were waiting to see you," Dorothy said. "I understood, and Jim would've too."

"I loved him you know," Kassandra said. "I really did. I loved the both of you."

"He knew, we knew," said Dorothy, "and we also knew that of the three of us, you had the best chance of making it big. We were so happy for you."

"That's a load of crap and you know it," the singer said unexpectedly. "You were a lot more talented than I was."

"Then maybe you just wanted it more."

"Do you ever think about it?" Kassandra asked. "What might have happened if I was the one who got pregnant and you went to Los Angeles instead. You know the way the three of us were back then, it could've just as well have been me."

"I really don't dwell on what might have beens," Dorothy said as she took a sip of tea. "We had a happy life together, that was enough."

"I can't get over Cassie," Kassandra said, changing the subject. "She looks so much like both you and Jim. I haven't seen her since she was six and the photographs you've sent over the years don't do her justice."

"She's a really great girl," the brunette smiled, "life wouldn't have been the same if we didn't have her. I wouldn't have survived losing Jim without her."

"She didn't know she was named after me," Kassandra noted. "I take it then you never told her about all of us and the band we had. Or what we all meant to each other."

"No, we didn't," Dorothy admitted, "but not because we were ashamed of any of it. We just thought it was a topic that could wait until we were all older. It seemed a much better idea that she think that her folks were always the no fun squares people sometimes took us to be."

"Now, that I can't believe," Kassandra laughed. "You might not be as wild as we were back then, but I refuse to believe that you and Jim turned into anything like that."

"Well, maybe not that bad."

"I thought so."

"So are you happy being one of the beautiful people?" Dorothy asked.

"To tell you the truth, DD," her old friend said, "and I think you are the one person that I can be totally honest with, I can't really say that I am."

"I'm surprised."

"Oh I love performing, making all those people happy," she explained. "It's just that so much of it all so phony. Too many people that'll say anything to you, just to have a piece of the action."

"You were married twice," Dorothy said, "wasn't that for love?"

"I thought so, at least at first," Kassandra replied, "but both of them just wanted what they could get as part of the Kassandra Express."

"I read about you all the time in People and some of the other magazines. You seem to lead an exciting life."

"Most of that is pure unadulterated crap," the singer laughed. "If I slept with every man and woman they've reported me with, I'd never have time for anything else."

"So they're all made up?" Dorothy asked out of curiosity.

"Well let's just say half of them are," Kassandra grinned. "What was it we used to call it back in the day? Working off the strain, or something like that..."

"Something like that," Dorothy agreed with a broad smile as she remembered days and nights long past.

They chatted for a few minutes more as Kassandra explained how she had finally learned of Dorothy's call. Her manager had brought over some papers for her to sign before she left for a promotional tour in Hawaii and happened to mention that he thought they should change her private line and code name again.

"Why is that?" she asked as she read the papers he handed her.

"Because we got another fan calling last Monday claiming to be a long lost friend who had to speak to you," he said. "That's the fourth time this month. It's only a matter of time before they post it on the Internet."

"Okay, take care of it," Kassandra said as she put her signature on the papers. "Just out of curiosity, what did this one want?"

"I'd give this one credit, although I'm not sure for imagination or audacity," he said as he collected the papers and put them in his attache case. "She wanted you to sing at her daughter's high school Prom. Imagine that, asking a woman who regularly fills Madison Square Garden to sing in some school gym."

"Might be fun," Kassandra mused.

"You can't be serious."

"No, I guess not," she said, remembering how long it'd been since she'd sang in a place where she could actually connect with her fans without a small army of security between them. "Did you at least get her name and address? We should at least send her daughter a personal letter congratulating her on finishing high school."

"Let me think," her manager said, "Dorothy Kenny, no not Kenny, I think it was Dorothy Kerr, from some place called Orange Rock in California."

Kassandra didn't take another breath before she told him to cancel the Hawaii trip. "Tell them that I need to take a rest," she told him.

"What better place to rest than Hawaii?" he had asked, unable to understand her sudden decision.

"And I want you to find out what school that girl goes to and make arrangements for me to sing there," she went on, "I don't care if you have to call every school in Orange Rock but I want you to do it without calling Mrs. Kerr back. I want it to be a surprise."

"Look, Kassandra, could you explain to me what the hell you're doing," he said. "A lot of people are expecting you in Hawaii."

"I'm correcting a mistake I never should've made," she said in a tone that he knew meant that she wasn't going to explain any further. "Just make it happen, understand."

"I'm grateful," Dorothy said as Kassandra finished her story.

"You don't have to be," Kassandra said. "I'm the one who should be thanking you. It's a chance for me to do something for my daughter that almost was."

"You'll stay here of course," Dorothy insisted.

"I was hoping you'd ask," Kassandra grinned. "I'm so sick of hotels and I could use the peace and quiet. My back up band will get here on Friday afternoon, just in time for the Prom. That'll give us two days to just visit."

"Well, I'm sure a little peace and quiet is something that we can provide," Dorothy smiled, "and this time I'm sure Cassie won't be blabbing to her friends."

Sure enough, this time Cassie did indeed keep the secret. Of course she also kept Kassandra up half the night asking what seemed like a thousand questions about the life of a superstar. The answers she got, of course, were a lot more tempered that those Kassandra had given Dorothy.

Thankfully, the next night would give Kassandra a chance for a full night's sleep as Cassie was going to spend it at Janet's house. It was a long planned sleepover, but one that the young girl would've been glad to skip. It was only at her mother's insistence that she kept her original plans, saying that it would give Kassandra a chance to rest as well.

Dorothy had no doubts that, even with the added temptation of spending the night with Janet, Cassie would keep her mouth shut about their houseguest. It now meant too much to her daughter to have Kassandra show up unexpectedly at the Prom and make fools out of all the people who had made her feel so bad. If she even suggested it to Janet, half the school would know by tomorrow afternoon.

Kassandra spent the afternoon making last minute arrangements for the dance. The school was overjoyed when contacted by her people and had managed to keep the secret as well. Widespread public knowledge of an appearance by a star of her magnitude would draw a crowd far larger than the school auditorium could ever hope to hold.

It was late when Kassandra finally returned, but Dorothy had waited up for her with a home cooked meal. The two old friends ate together, remembering again what the world had been like when they were Cassie's age. It was a remembrance that went almost as late into the night as Cassie's questions the night before.

An hour after they had said their goodnights, Dorothy still lay awake. Her mind was too filled with the memories her dear friend had reawakened in her. Memories of the love that she and Jim had shared. A love that had included their friend Cassie Morgan as well.

The memories brought with them sensations that had lately been absent from Dorothy's life. A stirring between her legs that had only been satisfied by a battery powered toy in the long months since her husband's death.

An arousal also reflected in her breasts as she ran one hand across them, her fingers playing with the stiff, thick nipples that could be felt even through her pajamas. Nipples she yearned to have sucked by a lover.

Dorothy moved her other hand down between her legs, stroking the already damp mound between them. She had always kept her hair tightly trimmed, better to savor the electric touch of her hand as first one, then a second finger slid deep in side of her.

Familiar sensations filled her as she caressed her body, bringing it quickly to the edge of bliss. It was process she had first learned when she was younger than her daughter. A time when her world was still fill of dreams. Dreams that included two people she would love all of her life.

"Oh Jim, I miss you so much," Dorothy softly said as she brought herself to the edge of orgasm.

Her fingers began to move at a more frantic pace, bringing her even closer to the chasm. Breaths came in shorter gasps as tears ran down her cheeks.

"Cassie, I missed you too," she said as the other great love of her life filled her inner eye.

If Dorothy had tilted her head a few inches to the left, she would've seen one of her objects of desire in a much more real image. Unable to sleep either, Kassandra had gotten up to get a drink a few minutes before. Passing her friend's room, she had heard her moan and opened the door just enough to see if Dorothy was okay.

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Story tagged with:
Fa/Fa / Consensual / Lesbian / Fiction / Oral Sex /