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Bad situation turns good

Fia1

Hey ladies and gents,

Looking for anything about someone who leaves bad situations to start a new life, getting revenge is optional, preferably a story with some length.

Any suggestions would be appreciated.

Cheers

Replies:   Argon
ustourist

Try Junkin Duncan by Happy Hugo. Good score, and could classify as a hidden gem as well.

Replies:   Fia1
Fia1

@ustourist

Thanks for the tip, almost finished reading it, it's pretty good so far!

Cheers

MarissaHorne

His Lucky Charm by Argon

http://storiesonline.net/s/65806/his-lucky-charm

Argon

@Fia1

Over on Wes Boyd's site (spearfishlaketales-dot-com) there is a new story currently being posted: Out of the Cage. It should pretty much fit your bill. Winchester Harbor and Square One are a others with a similar theme.
I could also suggest some of my own: Return From The Dark Side; Girl, Refurbished; Her Apple Pie and In Her Genes.

Replies:   Fia1  Fia1
Fia1

@Argon

Thanks, I'll check them all out.

Cheers

blacksash

Odd job by wtsman, not bad at all
http://storiesonline.net/s/66268:i

Fia1

@Argon

Hey, just finished his lucky charm, 1-2, great read. Really enjoyed them.

Cheers

sejintenej
Updated:

Second Chance by Number 7. The character gets killed in an RTA and comes to life in a new body with generally enjoyable results including wowing the ladies.

I think we are on his 12th reincarnation at present! Certainly he became Vice President - I think this is the story where The President is killed in 9/11 and he gets moved up

Yes, he gets some revenge - money for the RTA, a few rounds let off at various times with (from memory) a few baddies left bloodied and hors de combat etc.

(a question for our American friends - why is the word 'enjoyable' highlighted as wrong and the words 'enjable and enjablé' suggested - I know they not French but I don't know where they come from - this program uses a US spell check)

jimh67

@sejintenej

I think your spellcheck has been smoking something. "Enjoyable" is correct and I've never seen or heard the other two.

Ernest Bywater

@sejintenej

I know they not French but I don't know where they come from - this program uses a US spell check


most programs have a setting where you can easily change the spellchecker, I suggest you confirm what is says it's using. When I put those words into google and searched I get a bunch of hits in French.

Replies:   sejintenej
Crumbly Writer

@sejintenej

a question for our American friends - why is the word 'enjoyable' highlighted as wrong and the words 'enjable and enjablé' suggested - I know they not French but I don't know where they come from - this program uses a US spell check

I've NEVER heard either word used in English before. You might have a conflict between the two dictionaries.

sejintenej

@Ernest Bywater

most programs have a setting where you can easily change the spellchecker, I suggest you confirm what is says it's using. When I put those words into google and searched I get a bunch of hits in French

That was my immediate thought but it didn't object to any other word in the post and hasn't questioned any word here. In any case I confirm it is supposed to be an English dictionary. Weird.
The only program I have with a foreign dictionary is Word but it is a French version of Windows 7.

Replies:   Ernest Bywater
Ernest Bywater

@sejintenej

it is supposed to be an English dictionary. Weird.


Real weird. The two odd words showed up as French when I ran them through Google, but I've never seen them before your post, either.

One thing a lot of people aren't fully aware of is how many dictionaries are in their system and how the software doesn't all use the same one. Fire Fox has its own dictionary (as do most browsers), the operating system has its own dictionary, and the word processors have another one they use. Most software that has text editing or creation have their own built-in dictionary, some get overridden by the operating system software, and some don't. Often it's not always possible to work, for sure, which dictionary has final say on anything. Then to further confuse the situation, most word processing software allows you to set a dictionary for the main text, and also set another dictionary for selected text - which leaves you screaming aaargh.

madnige

@sejintenej

the words 'enjable and enjablé' suggested - I know they not French but I don't know where they come from


Both French, forms of 'Enjabler', fitting the base of a barrel into the groove in the barrel-staves (a bit esoteric, what?)

Replies:   sejintenej
KinkyWinks

http://storiesonline.net/s/10555:158377 This set of three stories match what you're looking for

sejintenej

@madnige

Both French, forms of 'Enjabler', fitting the base of a barrel into the groove in the barrel-staves (a bit esoteric, what?)

I just love browsing a site in English which specialises in words as esoteric as that.

I had always thought a remora was a fish which follows a larger fish (such as a shark) to feeds on what it leaves but no, remora is defined as "delay; obstacle" at
phrontistery.info

Replies:   LonelyDad  Not_a_ID
LonelyDad

From our friends at Merriam-Webster:

Also known as shark suckers or suckerfish, remoras are long, thin, dark fishes that are distributed throughout the world in warm seas. Ancient sailors believed remoras had the power to slow or even stop a ship by attaching themselves to it; the name remora, which means "delay" in Latin, arose from this ancient superstition.

LonelyDad
Updated:

@sejintenej

I think your first sentence says it all in regards to phrontistery.info. That site is only interested in the strict definition of the word itself. No info about its entomology whatsoever. In the Merriam Webster entry I mentioned above, the first and major definition was remora as fish. The second, very sparse definition was the only one phrontister had.

Replies:   sejintenej
sejintenej

@LonelyDad

I think your first sentence says it all in regards to phrontistery.info. That site is only interested in the strict definition of the word itself. No info about its entomology whatsoever.

I agree with your first two sentences.

When I first started work I lived in a student hostel where, of an evening, we would chat but in a manner such that third persons would not understand the subject. This involved word choice, careful creation of sentences, tonality etc. and the Phrontistery would have been a great help.
Associate Professor Steve Chrisomalis PhD is some type of linguistic anthropologist apparently interested in communication and numbers over the past few thousand years. I gather that he is Canadian, ex McGill University, Montreal and now at Wayne State Uni and has even had the BBC do an article about one of the many papers and books he has published.

Given his profession I think that we can enjoy his spare time hobby without asking too closely about the technical origin of words.

BlinkReader

You may try this:

The Scot - "The Hawk and Chipmunk"

Replies:   Fia1
Fia1

@BlinkReader

Hey BlinkReader.

Yeah I have read it, good story, lots of twists and turns.

Cheers

Not_a_ID

@sejintenej

just love browsing a site in English which specialises in words as esoteric as that.

I had always thought a remora was a fish which follows a larger fish (such as a shark) to feeds on what it leaves but no, remora is defined as "delay; obstacle" at
phrontistery.info


A now obsolete usage of "molest" was as a synonym for "annoy" before the sexual connotation became predominant.

Although it still works as a synonym in the sexual context. As sexually anoying someone is likely to bring about charges for some kind of relevant sex offence assuming said advances were unwelcome and unwanted.

Replies:   sejintenej
sejintenej

@Not_a_ID

A now obsolete usage of "molest" was as a synonym for "annoy" before the sexual connotation became predominant.

I'm not sure where you got that from - it CAN include that within a gamut of actions involving causing annoyance or becoming violent.

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