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Series, Serial, Sequel, Universe (or any other word that comes to mind)

PotomacBob

Is there general agreement among authors about the differences among a series, a serial, a sequel, or a a universe, or any of the other words that could be used to describe more than one story that uses the same or many of the same characters.
For example, if there's a story that follows the early years (say through middle school) of a character, then another story that follows that character through high school (but at least some of the characters change), then another story for college (where many of the characters are different), then one or more stories for the rest of the character's life - what is the name if you consider all of the stories together (one main character throughout).
And how does that differ from several stories set in the same place, but all the characters change (including the main character), but characters may appear in more than one of the stories.

Switch Blayde
Updated:

@PotomacBob

Are you talking specifically to SOL?

And don't forget, if you can have a sequel you can also have a prequel.

Switch Blayde
Updated:

@PotomacBob

I think a universe is a setting. Like Naked in school. (Maybe Star Trek)

A series is the same main character. Like Jack Reacher or James Bond. (But each story is separate.) (Actually, Star Trek is probably a series and not a universe.)

A sequel is a continuation of a completed novel. Like Jason Bourne. (How it differs from a series is that the story ties back to the previous one) I guess the Rocky movies would each be a sequel.

A prequel is something that happened before the first novel. Again, like Jason Bourne. (I think Hannibal was a prequel to Silence of the Lambs.)

A serial might be a continuation of the story. Like Lord of the Rings or a soap opera.

Replies:   Dominions Son  PotomacBob  REP
Ernest Bywater

Classic example of a Universe is the Damsels in Distress Universe where different authors write stories about different people within the same background setting.

Within that I have a series I named Chaos Calls which are stories focused around the same main character and his supporting cast. While they do follow on from, and refer to, the other stories in the series each story does stand alone and can be read without a need to read the others to enjoy them. Most sequels do stand alone but rely heavily on the preceding story, such as my story Survivor and it's sequel Survivor Moving On.

With sequels and a series you need to be careful about what defines the series as it may be a single central character, a group of character, a place, or an event that's the focus of the series.

Dominions Son

@Switch Blayde

think a universe is a setting. Like Naked in school. (Maybe Star Trek)

A series is the same main character. Like Jack Reacher or James Bond. (But each story is separate.) (Actually, Star Trek is probably a series and not a universe.


Universe and series are not mutually exclusive. Start Trek is several series within a common universe.

PotomacBob

@Switch Blayde

So, what moniker applies to A Well-Lived Life? or Bec? or Summer Camp? or Cammie Sue? Are they all the same or are there differences?

Remus2
Updated:

@PotomacBob

It is possible to have multiple series, sequels, prequels, stories in a singular universe and time line. The inverse requires time, dimension, continuum, multiverse, parallel-verses, etc travel/setting.

Prequel, story, sequel, etc implies a fixed timeline, not a specific place, person, or thing. At this time, India and Pakistan are shooting at each other in a low level (currently) conflict. Somewhere in Japan a student is waking up wondering what the day will bring. Somewhere in L.A. someone is pissed at the traffic, and at various points on the earth, a few million people are f***ing. All of which are happening simultaneously in a singular universe and time frame.

The events leading up to the above are past tense/prequel, and as this is typed, the sequel to those events (future) are playing out/set to happen. All of which at its root, has common world, and history, aka a universe.

Getting outside of that universe, all bets are off, it can be anything the author wants.

In another universe, prequels, stories, sequels can exist in the same manner as they could in our current universe. Key there being consistency. The common physical laws, history, timelines etc should be applied across that universe.

It takes a really gifted author (Heinlein for instance) to carry off translation from multiple universes simultaneously. In doing so, it's creating a universe of universes, which is particularly hard to keep consistent and readable at the same time.

That is how I see it.

REP
Updated:

@Switch Blayde

I would define the terms as:

Universe - a group of stories that have a common theme – the DID and Swarm universes are good examples.

Series - multiple standalone stories that have the same main character.

Sequel - the continuation of a prior story. What you said about a sequel tying back into the previous story is also true of a serial.

Serial – another term for a sequel.

Prequel – a story that is written after another story, but the second story that was written is set on the timeline of the two stories at a time prior to that of the other story.

richardshagrin

sequel

"What comes after a sequel?

Allen Taylor
Allen Taylor, Poet, fiction writer, and ghostwriter
Answered Nov 15, 2010 · Author has 311 answers and 549.7k answer views
It depends on where the story falls in relation to the timeline of the rest of the story. If the storyline comes before what the other two parts revealed then it would be a prequel.

If the third work falls between the events of the previous two works within the timeline of the overall story then it is called an interquel.

If the events of the third work falls within the timeline of one of the previous two works then it is often referred to as a midquel.

Sometimes the events of a sequel run parallel to the events of a previous story within the timeline. This is called a parallel (obviously).

If the events are in the distant future to the timeline of previous works within a series then that story is referred to as a distant sequel.

A stand-alone sequel is one that exists within the same fictional world as previous works but that have no relation to those works.

A sequel involving three stories in the series is referred to as a trilogy. A tetralogy is a four-part series; a five-part series is called a pentalogy. A Hexalogy is six in a series. A heptalogy is seven in a series. An octalogy is a story with eight independent stories within the series. An ennealogy and a decalogy are nine and ten in a series, respectively. We could go on and on with traditional naming conventions, but I'm sure you get the drift by now."

I use the internet to answer questions like this.

Uther_Pendragon

@PotomacBob

"Sequel" doesn't belong in this list. A sequel is a story following another story, probably with one or more of the same characters, probably with much the same background.

A story AND it's sequel(s) is a series.

One story, told in several stages, is a serial.

I've been thinking of turning some of my series into a serial each. The story arc really flows more between stories than is completed in a story.

A universe is more complex. We -- or Lazeez -- brought it over from SF, where it describes the way you think the galaxy is organized or the way you think society will go in the future. I use it for situations where the characters inter-react but not all stories have the same main characters. OTOH, my historical-first series has the daughter of the woman in the previous story losing her virginity. It's definitely a series, though no character in one story appears in the one after next.

Replies:   PotomacBob
Uther_Pendragon

@REP

Serial – another term for a sequel.


Not quit. A sequel is ONE story which comes after another in time and has a definite continuation.

A serial is a story which consists of chapters posted (or published) over a period of time. Many of what we consider "novels" were originally published as serials. David Copperfield, for one.

Replies:   REP
REP
Updated:

@Uther_Pendragon


A serial is a story which consists of chapters posted (or published) over a period of time.


That is the way many SOL authors post their stories. One chapter at a time over time; sometimes 1-2 chapters/year.

I wouldn't call their stories serials.

ETA: Although the formal definition of a serial story matches the way most multi-chapter stories are posted on SOL.

Replies:   Switch Blayde
Switch Blayde

@REP

Although the formal definition of a serial story matches the way most multi-chapter stories are posted on SOL.


You had the magazine serials, like Dickens. And you had the movie serials, where the cliffhanger got its notoriety.

Crumbly Writer

@REP

I would define the terms as:

Universe - a group of stories that have a common theme – the DID and Swarm universes are good examples.

Series - multiple standalone stories that have the same main character.

Sequel - the continuation of a prior story. What you said about a sequel tying back into the previous story is also true of a serial.

Serial – another term for a sequel.

That's a good summary, but one further distinction is that there are different kinds of Series:
1) Numbered Series - where each book follows the previous ones in a distinct chronological basis (such as Bec, Summer Camp or Beckie Sue).
2) Non-sequential Series - A series featuring the same characters, but which happen in a more-or-less random sequence (like Sherlock Holmes, or Murder She Wrote). In other words, you can read them in any order, and it won't matter.

Following this logic, most Universes are Non-Sequential, while the Series posted within the Universes typically are Numbered.

It's an important distinction to remember when setting up a series.

Replies:   joyR  helmut_meukel
richardshagrin
Updated:


Sequel


And then there are stories set at sea, the seaquel, like the Hornblower books. The guy who blew a trumpet longer and louder when the port about to be reached had more available women. The Whoreratio Hornblower.

Replies:   REP
REP

@richardshagrin

You must stay up all night thinking about things like that.

richardshagrin

I remember that Hornblower joke from an "article" intended as humor in Fantasy and Science Fiction Magazine. Long ago and far away.

Replies:   Uther_Pendragon
joyR

@Crumbly Writer

Following this logic, most Universes are Non-Sequential,


So would a Universe containing unrelated stories be a Non Sequitur..??

helmut_meukel

@Crumbly Writer

there are different kinds of Series:
1) Numbered Series - where each book follows the previous ones in a distinct chronological basis [...].
2) Non-sequential Series - A series featuring the same characters, but which happen in a more-or-less random sequence [...]. In other words, you can read them in any order, and it won't matter.


There is a series by Ka Hmnd which starts with one story (an ex-covert ops operator has to deal with assassins and alerts the other ex-members of his unit). Next are six parallel sequels (telling the story of each team member), they can be read in any order. Finally the last story (where they unite and deal with the thread).
Ka Hmnd "Retired but alive - Keys" (first story)
Ka Hmnd "Retired but alive - Brazilia"
Ka Hmnd "Retired but alive - Cattleman"
Ka Hmnd "Retired but alive - Sahara"
Ka Hmnd "Retired but alive - Sidney"
Ka Hmnd "Retired but alive - Timberland"
Ka Hmnd "Retired but alive - Winterland"
Ka Hmnd "Retired but alive - Kingdom" (concluding story)

HM.

Uther_Pendragon

@richardshagrin

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I remember that Hornblower joke from an "article" intended as humor in Fantasy and Science Fiction Magazine. Long ago and far away.

"Through time and space with Ferdinand Feghoot."

A series of stories -- to get back to the thread -- running once a month by "Grendel Briarton." Each short-short story ended in a pun or a Spoonerism.

PotomacBob

@Uther_Pendragon

"Sequel" doesn't belong in this list


The original question, which contained "Sequel," specified "more than one story that uses the same or many of the same characters."
You are insisting that a "sequel" cannot be a story that uses the same or many of the same characters?

Replies:   Uther_Pendragon
Uther_Pendragon

@PotomacBob


The original question, which contained "Sequel," specified "more than one story that uses the same or many of the same characters."

You are insisting that a "sequel" cannot be a story that uses the same or many of the same characters?


No. I'm claiming that a sequel is not "More than o ne story."

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son

@Uther_Pendragon

No. I'm claiming that a sequel is not "More than o ne story."


But original + sequel is more than one story. You can't have a sequel without having an original, so sequel means at least two stories.

Replies:   helmut_meukel
helmut_meukel

@Dominions Son

But original + sequel is more than one story. You can't have a sequel without having an original, so sequel means at least two stories.


Ahhh, no.
A sequel is always just one story, but it's a follow-up of another story.
If I buy and read a sequel I read only one story and it still is a sequel even if I never read the preceding story. The term sequel implies there is somewhere another story but not necessarily already published.
BTW, this happens quite often with translations, when the foreign language publisher starts with the bestselling third book in a series and then maybe they begin translating and publishing the previous books.
The third book is still the sequel to the second book even if the translation of the second book is not available to the foreign language reader.

HM.

PotomacBob

@helmut_meukel

A sequel is always just one story, but it's a follow-up of another story


If that's true, what distinguishes a sequel from a chapter?

Dominions Son

@helmut_meukel

I never read the preceding story.


That matters not one whit, you could could do the same thing with a series of 10 books starting from book 5.

Replies:   helmut_meukel
awnlee jawking

@helmut_meukel

The term sequel implies there is somewhere another story but not necessarily already published.


The first Star Wars film to be made was a sequel, being part 4.

AJ

helmut_meukel

@Dominions Son

you could could do the same thing with a series of 10 books starting from book 5


And book 5 is the sequel to book 4. The sequel is not 2 books and the use of the term sequel is not restricted to book 2 of a two book series.

HM.

helmut_meukel

@PotomacBob

what distinguishes a sequel from a chapter?


There is no good answer.
With dead tree books it's quite simple:
one book - Chapters;
more than one book - all not in the first book - sequel.
I once read a thick novel, some years later the author wrote a sequel – a three chapter novelette.

Especially with serialized stories as here on SOL the author decides. He decides after how many chapters to end the book. The next chapter then starts the sequel. Other authors don't devide their story into multible books, they simple continue the story. No publisher would print a 600+ chapter novel as one book.

The size? Not really. Chapters are short but so are short stories. Look at Randall Garrett's Lord Darcy stories. All were originally published separately.
The editors of Baen's collection Lord Darcy write:

"The Napoli Express" is a direct sequel to "The Sixteen Keys"

the publishing dates are May 1976 and April 1979. The stories in this collection are arranged like chapters in a novel.

To answer your question: a sequel is a separate entity.

HM.

Switch Blayde

@PotomacBob

what distinguishes a sequel from a chapter?


A sequel is a complete story.

Replies:   PotomacBob
PotomacBob

@Switch Blayde


A sequel is a complete story.


If a sequel is a "complete" story, then, logically, there cannot be a sequel to a sequel, because the story is already "complete."

Goldfisherman

@PotomacBob

I think You have it PotomacBob.

Switch Blayde

@PotomacBob

If a sequel is a "complete" story, then, logically, there cannot be a sequel to a sequel, because the story is already "complete."


Nope. A sequel is another complete story that takes place after the one before it.

When the first one is written, there's usually no thought of a sequel. It's a finished (complete) story. Then it's a success so the author writes a sequel.

Think of the first Jason Bourne. It ends with he and his girlfriend getting away and living a good life. The sequel begins there and she's killed which begins the second story. It also ends. But then they write the third one and decide to give him his memory back. So what do they do for the next one? They write a prequel.

Now Back to the Future was different. The first movie ended. It was a success so they did a sequel. But the sequel wasn't complete. It ended with a cliffhanger because they knew they were going to do Part III. I guess Part II was a sequel, but it left you hanging.

oldegrump

OK. I see that people say a series needs the same MC. I disagree but I may be wrong. Then again you all may be wrong (LOL). My series is posted as a series rather than as a universe because all the stories are on the same premise. Cheating Cliches - home early; - sudden lack of sex etc.

If I am wrong, I need to find a way to change it to a universe. All responses will be ignored. (LOL2)

CAT the Oldgrump

oldegrump

OK. I see that people say a series needs the same MC. I disagree but I may be wrong. Then again you all may be wrong (LOL). My series is posted as a series rather than as a universe because all the stories are on the same premise. Cheating Cliches - home early; - sudden lack of sex etc.

If I am wrong, I need to find a way to change it to a universe. All responses will be ignored. (LOL2)

CAT the Oldgrump

Switch Blayde

@oldegrump

because all the stories are on the same premise.


That could be more theme. Definitely not series.

awnlee jawking
Updated:

@oldegrump

I see that people say a series needs the same MC. I disagree but I may be wrong.


You're not wrong. The only requisite for a 'series' is that the stories are somehow related.

George RR Martin's 'A Song of Ice and Fire' is a series, but the main character in one book is sometimes entirely absent from the next, only to reappear in later books.

AJ

robberhands

@awnlee jawking

George RR Martin's 'A Song of Ice and Fire' is a series, but the main character in one book is sometimes entirely absent from the next, only to reappear in later books.

Or they get killed and don't return at all.

'A Song of Ice and Fire' is one ongoing story broken into five books (so far, and I doubt there will ever be a sixth). So it's a serial rather than a series but who cares about such semantic subtleties?

Replies:   PotomacBob
PotomacBob

@robberhands

So it's a serial rather than a series but who cares about such semantic subtleties?


What IS the difference between a series and a serial?

Switch Blayde
Updated:

@PotomacBob


What IS the difference between a series and a serial?


A series contains the same character(s) in each book. You can read them out of sequence.

In a serial, each book is a continuation of the previous one so you need to read them in sequence.

ETA: btw, I believe those are TV terms.

robberhands

@Switch Blayde

btw, I believe those are TV terms.

No. In this context serial is simply short for serialized novel.

I agree with your definition for serial but think the categorization for a series is much wider. It doesn't need the appearance of any particular character; a general theme or simply just the scenery will do as well.

Replies:   Switch Blayde
Switch Blayde

@robberhands

a general theme or simply just the scenery will do as well.


Isn't that a universe?

robberhands

@Switch Blayde

Isn't that a universe?

In a universe, it doesn't even need a particular author. Universe refers to the large number of possible stories, too vast to be contained in a series. I think it's more advertisement than specification.

Dominions Son

@Switch Blayde

A series contains the same character(s) in each book. You can read them out of sequence.


Yes, technically you can and each book has it's own distinct story, but with a numbered series, within the series universe, there is a distinct chronological order to the stories.

John Demille

@Switch Blayde

https://storiesonline.net/h/31/what-is-a-universe

https://storiesonline.net/h/29/what-is-a-series

https://storiesonline.net/h/18/whats-the-difference-between-series-and-serial-how-do-i-choose

Dominions Son

@PotomacBob

What IS the difference between a series and a serial?


As I understand it, serials come out in periodic episodes which are not necessarily complete stories in their own right.

This used to be done by newspapers publishing text fiction in serial form.

However, outside of never ending on-line "books" published on sites like SOL, I am not aware of this form being used in modern times in straight text fiction. Although comic books are generally serials.

awnlee jawking

@Switch Blayde

Isn't that a universe?


In creative writing terms, a universe implies world-building elements and rules (although Dr Who, for instance, is an 'inconsistent universe'.)

Damsels in Distress and Swarm Cycle are obvious examples of universes because there are rules to be followed to maintain canon.

There are several TV Crime Dramas set in New York, but they each have their own rules to maintain canon. In some, forensic scientists are armed, and investigate and interrogate suspects. In others the forensic scientists are unarmed and restricted to the examination of crime scenes and evidence. Therefore the scenery (New York) is the same but they're different universes.

AJ

Crumbly Writer

@awnlee jawking

George RR Martin's 'A Song of Ice and Fire' is a series, but the main character in one book is sometimes entirely absent from the next, only to reappear in later books.

Not all books have a single, easily-recognizable main character (besides, in Martin's books, they're likely to die horribly at any given moment). Instead, a series needs to follow the same characters, or cast, through a series of events, though I have seen variations on the theme.

I'm working on a new story premise, where a group of experts are scattered, thus each book focuses on each one, as they struggle to reconnect with the others. It's the 'same cast', even though they don't appear in the same individual books together.

Then again, I'm sitting on another (apocalyptic) book, where each section follows a different group, letting them develop slowly until they begin interacting later on in the book. Once again, there IS no central protagonist, just separate incidents following disparate groups of individuals.

Replies:   PotomacBob
PotomacBob

@Crumbly Writer

"If a part of the tale requires a previous part, then it shouldn't be a series; it should be a serial and posted as multiple chapters."
That quote is lifted from the SOL "what's the difference between a series and a serial" cited above by John Demille.
It seems to me, based on this thread, that the authors on this site do not agree about the distinctions among the various terms. I thought I understood the SOL until it suggested a serial "should be posted as multiple chapters," which sounds like a serial is no different from a simple no-serial, no-sequel, no-universe book that contains chapters.
Would somebody like to take another stab at definitions and distinctions on which there is a consensus?

joyR

@PotomacBob

It seems to me, based on this thread, that the authors on this site do not agree about the distinctions among the various terms.


Exactly when have the authors (those who post in this forum) ever agreed upon anything..??

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Dominions Son

@PotomacBob

Would somebody like to take another stab at definitions and distinctions on which there is a consensus?


I'll put it this way.

A series is a set of "books" with the following characteristics:

Follows a common set of characters, or an organization.

Each being a complete story in it's own right.

The series has a chronology that spans the entire set of stories, but the individual books do not have to be published in the order of the internal chronology.

A Serial is a story broken into segments which are published on a periodical basis or set of loosely related, relatively short stories published on a periodical basis like a newspaper or magazine.

Something can be both a series and a Serial. Some TV series for example have a story line that runs the entire season, so that one season would be a "book" in as series comprised of the set of seasons and the individual episodes would be subsets of one story published periodically.

Replies:   PotomacBob
PotomacBob

@Dominions Son

In the Summer Camp group of stories, there are four "books" published on SOL, written by Nick Scipio. All four of them follow the same main character through different times in the MC's life, starting, IIRC, about 12 or 13 years old. In book 4, the MC is in college.
Ignoring all the other stories written by other people and that are labeled as being in the Summer Camp "Universe," are those stories a series or a serial or both or something else? They were released one chapter at a time starting in 2003, and sometimes the time between one chapter and the next was more than a year.
This was not on television, so there was no "season." Relative to the group of stories taken as a whole, the stories were published on a periodic basis - but not in a newspaper or magazine. That seems to me to fit Dominion Son's description of a serial.
The group of stories does have a chronology that spans the entire set of stories. they were published on SOL in the order of the internal chronology. That seems to me to fit Dominion Son's definition of a series.
Since there are other authors who write related stories - usually NOT following the main character - that seems to me to fit earlier descriptions of a universe.
If that application of terms is correct, how would they apply to, say, Revenge of the Nerd, or Stupid Boy, or A Well-Lived Life or A Fresh Start? (I have not checked to see what terminology the author used in any of those.)
And one last query - does it matter? And if it does not, then why do people here keep "correcting" other people they say are misusing the terms?

Replies:   Dominions Son
helmut_meukel

@PotomacBob

I thought I understood the SOL until it suggested a serial "should be posted as multiple chapters," which sounds like a serial is no different from a simple no-serial, no-sequel, no-universe book that contains chapters.

A serial is a novel published in consecutive parts – chapter by chapter or in larger parts of more than one chapter at a time, e.g. published in a newspaper or magazine. So most stories here on SOL start as serials.
There is one difference between printed serials and online serials here on SOL. Once concluded, a printed serial stays a serial scattered over different issues of the magazine until republished as a book. Here on SOL the parts of the serial are automatically consolidated into the book.

HM.

Ernest Bywater

OK, People, the easiest way to describe the difference between a series and a serial will be to give some TV examples.

A series is something like the shows Murder She Wrote or Inspector Morse where each story is a full story of its own and can be watched or read by itself. They can include on-going themes and items, but they shouldn't need all of the prior stories to be understood and enjoyed. My Chaos Call stories is such a series of stories here at SoL.

A serial is something like General Hospital or Days of Our Lives where a number of the previous stories are needed to make full sense of the current story as none of them stand alone.

My set of short stories in the Clan Amir universe are like this in that many of them have components that need to be read in order to fully appreciate the later stories. It's because of this I'll be reposting them in collections once the editors finish telling me about my mistakes in them.

To confuse matters when something is presented in parts over time it's called a serial as well, thus stories posted at SoL over multiple days are listed as a serial until completed.

Dominions Son
Updated:

@PotomacBob

are those stories a series or a serial or both or something else?


I'd say nearly but not quite both (I'll explain that in a bit), at least for those who read them while they were being published.

but not in a newspaper or magazine.


I didn't say in a newspaper or magazine. I said like a newspaper or magazine, and by that, I meant at regular defined intervals.

Since there are other authors who write related stories - usually NOT following the main character - that seems to me to fit earlier descriptions of a universe.


I would describe a universe as a number of stories related by setting (world building) and possibly nothing more than setting. The number of authors is irrelevant

Replies:   PotomacBob
richardshagrin

If a story is corny and flakey its a cereal.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
PotomacBob
Updated:

@Dominions Son


at regular defined intervals.


So, if they are published from time to time, not on a regular schedule, they are NOT a serial?

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son

@PotomacBob

I would consider it an edge case, it depends on how irregular the posting schedule is.

Switch Blayde
Updated:

For SOL, the only two that have meaning are universe and series. And series can be sequenced or not.

The rest is not relevant to SOL.

ETA: If you like, the "in progress" on SOL could indicate it's a serial. If it completes, it's no longer a serial but a completed story. If it never completes, it remains one of those never ending serials.

Replies:   PotomacBob
awnlee jawking

@PotomacBob

Serial refers to the initial method of publication - in excerpts. Each excerpt can be from as little as a chapter to as much as a complete book.

Series refers to the overall make-up of a completed work and refers to a discrete set of stories or books.

Series and Serial are not mutually exclusive because they cover different concepts.

AJ

Crumbly Writer

@PotomacBob

That quote is lifted from the SOL "what's the difference between a series and a serial" cited above by John Demille.
It seems to me, based on this thread, that the authors on this site do not agree about the distinctions among the various terms. I thought I understood the SOL until it suggested a serial "should be posted as multiple chapters," which sounds like a serial is no different from a simple no-serial, no-sequel, no-universe book that contains chapters.

The SOL distinction is more clearly identified as a 'sequential' vs. a 'non-sequential' series, whereas a Universe is a story set in a particular setting/environment where the books are not limited to either a single author or a specific order (i.e. each story stands apart from the others, and none violate the 'rules' by answering the underlying questions/conflicts driving the story.

However, there are many non-sequential series, so that distinction doesn't directly apply to Universes.

Crumbly Writer

@joyR

Exactly when have the authors (those who post in this forum) ever agreed upon anything..??

Hey! We All agree that everyone else's points are obnoxious tripe, and that only we hold the ultimate key to 'correct' writing. What's hypocritical about that? 'D

Crumbly Writer

@richardshagrin

If a story is corny and flakey its a cereal.

Or mushy, then it's a HOT cereal. 'D

PotomacBob

@Switch Blayde

ETA


What does ETA mean?

Replies:   Switch Blayde
Switch Blayde

@PotomacBob

What does ETA mean?


Edited To Add

Replies:   rustyken  psnz
rustyken

@Switch Blayde

Estimated time of arrival
and...

;-)

psnz
Updated:

@Switch Blayde


What does ETA mean?

Edited To Add


What does ETA stand for?

Gotta love Elvis Tribute Artist and Extra Terrestrial Alien.

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