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WTF???

REP
Updated:

I'm glad to hear that this author has sought out an editor and proofreader. His stories certainly needed their help.

But, the following blog post leaves me scratching my head:


My turn around time is very tight so I had to discontinue naming the individual editor and proof reader but thank you all for your help; The story is better for it; Hell I even learn from it


How long does it take to type one sentence, into the end note section, when posting. 2-3 minutes if you are a hunt-and-peck typist, and we authors don't have deadlines imposed on us. If he put it in the chapter, about the same amount of time.

It probably took him longer to type his blog entry than it would have to type in an acknowledgement.

ETA: This guy is one of the few authors I have almost no respect for, but he is a very good storyteller.

Replies:   awnlee jawking
awnlee jawking

@REP

Read the title of the blog post. It implies multiple readers are supplying corrections and suggestions. I assumed his blog text should have used the plural, and it would take too long to acknowledge all those who contribute feedback.

AJ

Replies:   REP
seanski1969
Updated:

How about DM me the authors name so I can add it to the list of individuals I won't read. I only read people who have some common decency and this author seems to lack it.

Thanks for all the DMs I know who to avoid and was glad it wasn't someone I actually liked. :)

Replies:   awnlee jawking
REP

@awnlee jawking

Read the title of the blog post.


Okay, I can see him not acknowledging everyone who sent him feedback in a post.

But in the text he specifically stated he isn't going to acknowledge his editor and proofreader.

Replies:   awnlee jawking
awnlee jawking

@REP

IIRC he tried using his wife as a proofreader for a while but that didn't work out too well so he went back to his 'quick and dirty' style.

Personally I think his stories are worth the trouble of reading, although I accept others will disagree.

AJ

Replies:   REP
awnlee jawking

@seanski1969

seanski1969 isn't a hyperlink. How do people know how to DM him?

AJ

Replies:   REP
REP

@awnlee jawking

At one point, I agreed with you. But, I was finally worn down by the sentences with key words missing, extra words left in, words out of sequence, etc.

I just got tired of stopping to figure out what a sentence meant.

doctor_wing_nut

I've never read that person's work, but I do have to thank him for this story description, which confirmed my choice:

a slow boring story about nothing. Filled with grammar and word usage mistakes. I wouldn't waste my time were I you.


Deal.

I believe that covers it.

REP

@awnlee jawking

How do people know how to DM him?


They click the DM button in the bottom right corner of his post. If they don't know that, they can check Lazeez's help pages

Replies:   awnlee jawking
awnlee jawking

@REP

Thank you.

At my age, it's nice to learn something new. Even though it's the same something I learned a week ago ;)

AJ

Replies:   karactr  Ernest Bywater
karactr

@awnlee jawking

At my age, it's nice to learn something new. Even though it's the same something I learned a week ago ;)


Welcome to the marvelous world of CRS. Enjoy it while you can remember it :p

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son

@karactr

the marvelous world of CRS


CRS: Can't Remember... Shit, I forgot how it ends. :)

Ernest Bywater

@awnlee jawking

Even though it's the same something I learned a week ago ;)


You can remember a whole week, you lucky devil to have such a good memory.

Replies:   richardshagrin
richardshagrin

@Ernest Bywater

remember

In the land of RE, a re member can be a penis.

"member noun, often attributive
mem·​ber | ˈmem-bər
Definition of member
1 : a body part or organ: such as
a : LIMB
b : PENIS
c : a unit of structure in a plant body
2 : one of the individuals composing a group
3 : a person baptized or enrolled in a church
4 : a part of a whole: such as
a : a syntactic or rhythmic unit of a sentence : CLAUSE
b : one of the propositions of a syllogism
c : one of the elements of a set or class
d : either of the equated elements in a mathematical equation"

Replies:   Wheezer  Ernest Bywater
Wheezer

@richardshagrin


In the land of RE, a re member can be a penis...


^
|_____ another shining example of why Great Britain is no longer an empire. :/

Replies:   StarFleet Carl
Ernest Bywater

@richardshagrin

member can be a penis


which explains the behaviour of members of parliament and members of the house in the US congress.

Remus2

@Ernest Bywater

which explains the behaviour of members of parliament and members of the house in the US congress.


Along with the upper political echelons of every major world government.

Dominions Son

@Ernest Bywater

which explains the behaviour of members of parliament and members of the house in the US congress.


Here's a better explanation.

1. The intelligence of a committee is roughly proportional to the average intelligence of the committee members divided by the number of committee members. avg(IQ)/#members.

2. The US Congress is a committee with 535 members.

Think about that for a while. The average IQ of the general population is 100 by definition, so the IQ of the US Congress is roughly 100/535 or around 0.2

richardshagrin

I am reasonably certain the average IQ of members of Congress exceeds the average score of 100. More than one standard deviation above the mean may be higher than actual fact, but to run for office and collect the money needed to win takes a certain native intelligence. Lets assume the average is nearly 115. Also the US Congress mostly works in committees mostly of a dozen or so members. That gives committee chairmen and subcommittee chairmen more power. So the average IQ of Congress is nearly ten (115 divided by 12).

Dominions Son

@richardshagrin

Also the US Congress mostly works in committees mostly of a dozen or so members. That gives committee chairmen and subcommittee chairmen more power. So the average IQ of Congress is nearly ten (115 divided by 12).


That's only the IQ of an individual special purpose committee, not congress as a whole. Congress as a whole is still one very large committee.

StarFleet Carl

@Wheezer

another shining example of why Great Britain is no longer an empire


I thought the end of the British Empire was when Benny Hill died. He's the only comedian from there that I could halfway get his jokes.

Replies:   awnlee jawking
awnlee jawking

@richardshagrin

Lets assume the average is nearly 115.


Let's not - http://weeklyworldnews.com/headlines/36094/study-congress-filled-with-morons/

AJ

Replies:   Tw0Cr0ws
awnlee jawking

@StarFleet Carl

We still have an Empire! We have dominion over Gibraltar, the Falklands, Tristan da Cunha, the Channel Isles, the Isle of Man ... ;)

AJ

Replies:   StarFleetCarl
PotomacBob

@Ernest Bywater

and members of the house in the US congress.


Members of the Senate are immune?

Replies:   Ernest Bywater
Ernest Bywater

@PotomacBob

Members of the Senate are immune?


Not really, but they're called senators and not members of the house.

PotomacBob

@Ernest Bywater

Just wondering why you didn't mention the Senators, who are, along with representatives, called "members of Congress." Does "not really" mean something different from "no"?

Dominions Son

@Ernest Bywater

Not really, but they're called senators and not members of the house.


Technically, Members of the House aren't called members of the House either. It's the House of Representatives and it's members are properly called Representatives.

Replies:   PotomacBob
StarFleetCarl

@awnlee jawking

dominion over ... the Isle of Man


I think that belongs to Mark Higgins and the Subaru STI race team.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DRg5Sp1iQMc

Replies:   awnlee jawking
awnlee jawking

@StarFleetCarl

Subaru STI race team


Subaru has a team that races to spread sexually transmitted infections? Ewwwwww!

AJ

Tw0Cr0ws

@awnlee jawking

A publication that makes the National Enquirer seem sane and reasonable.

Darian Wolfe

@Tw0Cr0ws

You mean it's not? That would explain a lot. My mom and aunts had stacks of it and the Star and I plowed through them when I was about seven and we would talk about the stories while they were playing rummy or reading tea leaves.

I bet you're going to tell me Jean Dixon was fake too.

Replies:   Tw0Cr0ws
awnlee jawking

@Tw0Cr0ws

A google search found several articles based on what I assumed was a single study. I copied the first link.

From experience of UK politicians, I'm inclined to believe the study erred on the side of generosity. Take Diane Abbott's mathematics for example ;)

AJ

PotomacBob

@Dominions Son

In Washington DC, both Senators and Representatives are usually called "members" by their congressional staffers. It may not be "technical" and it may not be formal and it may not be what the books tell you to call them - but it IS in wide usage.

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son

@PotomacBob

In Washington DC, both Senators and Representatives are usually called "members" by their congressional staffers.


Generally in the context of calling them members of Congress, referring to Congress as a whole rather than to the Senate or House separately. This is largely part of an effort to avoid the gender specific congressman/congresswoman.

Replies:   Not_a_ID
Tw0Cr0ws

@Darian Wolfe

No, you are right, it is 100% real.

Now just look directly into the neuralyzer, this won't hurt a bit.

Replies:   Darian Wolfe
Darian Wolfe

@Tw0Cr0ws

You touch my tinfoil hat I'll smack you. lol

Dominions Son

@Darian Wolfe

You touch my tinfoil hat I'll smack you. lol


Neuralyzer's work through the optic nerve, your tinfoil hat is useless against it.

Replies:   karactr
karactr

@Dominions Son

You touch my tinfoil hat I'll smack you. lol

Neuralyzer's work through the optic nerve, your tinfoil hat is useless against it.


Tin makes a sucky Faraway cage. Have you considered Flerovium?

Replies:   Dominions Son
Not_a_ID

@Dominions Son

In Washington DC, both Senators and Representatives are usually called "members" by their congressional staffers.



Generally in the context of calling them members of Congress, referring to Congress as a whole rather than to the Senate or House separately. This is largely part of an effort to avoid the gender specific congressman/congresswoman.


Are you sure it isn't a way to call them a bunch of penis heads?

Replies:   rustyken
Dominions Son

@karactr

Tin makes a sucky Faraway cage


A Faraday cage has to be fully enclosed anyway. As I understand it, the point of the tinfoil hat is to act not as a Faraday cage, but as a reflector against RF/microwave radiation.

Replies:   Ernest Bywater  madnige
Ernest Bywater

@Dominions Son

As I understand it, the point of the tinfoil hat is to act not as a Faraday cage, but as a reflector against RF/microwave radiation.


I always thought the tinfoil hat was to help them cook their few brains more!

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son

@Ernest Bywater

I always thought the tinfoil hat was to help them cook their few brains more!


I suppose that depends on whether they wear it shiny side out or shiny side in. :)

awnlee jawking

@Darian Wolfe

You touch my tinfoil hat I'll smack you. lol


Why should you be protected against having government messages beamed into your head! You should have to suffer like the rest never had it so good. ;)

AJ

madnige

@Dominions Son

A Faraday cage has to be fully enclosed


Not really, full enclosure is better (but the enclosure and all joints must be conductive), but provided the longest dimension of any openings is less than about 10% of the shortest wavelength (highest frequency) of interest, nothing significant gets through. This is why you can look into a running microwave oven without cooking your eyes; that metal mesh in the door closes the opening of the door, completing the enclosure.

However, what's commonly called tinfoil is not made of tin, it's aluminium (aluminum for the colonial rebels), which although is a better conductor than tin, also has a tough surface oxide layer which prevents conduction across joints, reducing its efficacy in a tinfoil hat. The only place I know of we can find tin domestically (apart from the plating over steel for 'tin cans', and solder in electronics) is the foil caps for many premium high proof beverages sealed by cork (preferably single malt). I recommend making you tinfoil hat with real tin foil scavenged from plenty of these bottles, after consuming the contents of course.

Replies:   Remus2  awnlee jawking
rustyken

@Not_a_ID

I think the phrase you are looking for is "Pecker heads" not "Penis heads"

Replies:   StarFleet Carl
Remus2
Updated:

@madnige

http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/Waves/mwoven.html

http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/Waves/emwv.html#c1

Might want to check your 'facts'.

Replies:   madnige
StarFleet Carl

@rustyken

"Pecker heads"


Rinse them, slice them in half, dip them in egg batter, fry them up. Damned good eating.

https://www.reddit.com/r/mycology/comments/1e3thg/they_call_them_peckerheads_for_a_reason/

madnige

@Remus2

Might want to check your 'facts'.


From the link you gave:

Even though you can see into the microwave oven when your food is cooking, the microwaves are effectively blocked from getting out into the room because the holes in the metal screen on the microwave oven door are about 1 mm in diameter compared to a 120 mm wavelength for the microwaves. The wavelength of the microwaves is about 120 times the size of the holes, and can't "see" the holes to get out.


Last time I checked, 1/120 was less than 10%

Replies:   Remus2
awnlee jawking

@madnige

Not really, full enclosure is better (but the enclosure and all joints must be conductive), but provided the longest dimension of any openings is less than about 10% of the shortest wavelength (highest frequency) of interest, nothing significant gets through. This is why you can look into a running microwave oven without cooking your eyes; that metal mesh in the door closes the opening of the door, completing the enclosure.


Early microwaves didn't have a turntable. I remember an experiment where scientists placed an ant at a carefully calculated location and turned on the microwave. The ant was unharmed.

AJ

Replies:   REP
REP

@awnlee jawking

The ant was unharmed.


Less than 10% of the microwave wavelength so the electromagnetic waves missed him. :)

Replies:   awnlee jawking  madnige
awnlee jawking

@REP

the electromagnetic waves missed him.


Wouldn't the ant have been a 'her'? I thought male ants were large and winged.

AJ

Replies:   Dominions Son  REP
Dominions Son

@awnlee jawking

I thought male ants were large and winged.


I thought male ants were uncles. :)

madnige

@REP

Less than 10% of the microwave wavelength so the electromagnetic waves missed him. :)

With no turntable or (microwave) stirrer, there will be a standing wave pattern with peaks of power and areas of no significant power, with the peaks roughly 6cm apart so there's plenty of room to fit an ant into a hole in the power distribution. You might have meant it as a joke, but it's exactly right.

Replies:   helmut_meukel
helmut_meukel

@madnige

For me the most annoying "feature" of microwave ovens is its limited penetration depth. If you deepfroze stew or any other
dish in 3 person portions, you will find the microwaves wont penetrate deep enough. So while the outer parts get already warm there remains a frozen core.

In the textile industry they use HF-driers based on the same physical principle but deeper penetration.

HM.

Replies:   Remus2
REP

@awnlee jawking

Those are ant fairies.

Replies:   awnlee jawking
awnlee jawking

@REP

Those are ant fairies.


I know you're not serious because I've never seen one carrying a magic wand ;)

AJ

Replies:   REP  AmigaClone
REP

@awnlee jawking

You mean you have never read Kris Me's stories and how magical entities store their wands. :)

Remus2

@madnige

λ = v/f

Next comes an understanding of wave mechanics.

Then follow that with an understanding that the hole in question has to be less than 1/2 the λ. The safety factor involved in a microwave oven door does not equal the actual requirements to block the microwaves. Microwave oven doors are overkill engineering.

Regarding the links, they were a starting point. I learned a long time ago not to debate the finer points of a technical discussion with someone unwilling to follow through with support of their argument. If they are unwilling to do their own homework, nothing I say or do can change their opinion or mind.

At least you read the link though. That's more than most do before they toss out wiki links as if they wrote them.

Replies:   madnige
Remus2
Updated:

@helmut_meukel

In the textile industry they use HF-driers based on the same physical principle but deeper penetration.


That is a function of wavelength. The higher the frequency, the less penetration. The lower the frequency, the higher the penetration.

That is until you get into ionizing radiation frequencies. There are other effects that come into play there.

The industrial microwaves you speak of are not safe for the general public to use. Nor would they be cost effective if available to them.

Edit; remember that's in general terms. There are exceptions like about everything else, especially when dealing with em waves and the specifics of the materials in question.

AmigaClone

@awnlee jawking


I know you're not serious because I've never seen one carrying a magic wand ;)


Read the latest Kris Me story...

madnige
Updated:

@Remus2


understanding that the hole in question has to be less than 1/2 the λ.


Interesting things happen at λ/2: the holes act as slot antennae, and this size provides the optimum coupling from one side to the other. Many mobile phone antennae use a waveguide with λ/2 slots to deliberately couple the signal to the outside world. However, it doesn't form a 'brick wall' filter so that slightly higher frequencies are blocked, rather they are attenuated at a rate I assume from experience in the wired world to be about 6dB/octave, so the transmittance with λ/10 holes would be about 0.1%. Even then that's not the whole story - X-ray machines have a filter to filter out the 'soft' X-rays, and this is a continuous sheet (no holes) of aluminium - the harder (>~70kEv) X-rays pass through it, albeit with some attenuation (exposure times are increased to compensate).

A real-world example I had was for an Oxygen sensor on some equipment I was designing. I sent the circuit diagram of the company standard for this (plus mods to suit the new equipment) along with various notes to the PCB design house (I was too busy with other aspects of the design to do the PCB layout as well), and the design as returned suffered from extreme sensitivity to interference (would alarm if a mobile phone was in use within a few metres). I redid the layout of the sensor PCB to better match my notes (minimum loop areas, balanced input paths, maximum ground plane coverage with minimal holes) without changing the circuitry, and the new layout survived having a mobile phone resting on the sensor with a reading change of only about +-2 in the last digit (better than 100 times less change). With the mobile phone frequency of 1.8GHz, this gives λ/2 at about 8cm and the whole PCB was only 3cm across so should have been immune by your reasoning, and the old design longest ground-plane void was about 15mm, λ/2 for about 8GHz which is well above mobile phone frequencies. My re-layout had a longest ground-plane void of under 5mm which should have given an improvement of about 12-18dB, so some of the overall improvement will have been due to the other measures, but this illustrates the point.

ETA:


At least you read the link though.


No, actually I opened it, glanced through the content, and said to myself, 'OK, that's what he's using'. The math-heavy link I opened, said to myself 'Looks familiar, I'd have to go back to the textbooks to check it, but I trust this website, and anyway the theory is not too relevant to the discussion'.

ETA2:

Quiz type question: does anyone know which physicist-authored SF book had aliens communicating with humans (initially) by thermal X-rays? It's such a strong concept, it stuck in my mind.

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