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Lots of butthurt author blogs recently

Reluctant_Sir

Authors posting sour blogs about reader comments, about voting scores, about story or plot complaints.

Is it me or is there a rise in the number of authors determined to egg on their detractors?

Is complaining about them in a blog, letting them know they are getting to you, a valid strategy?

I think it is encouraging those determined to be insulting. I think they would love to learn they hurt your feelings and may even escalate to see if they can get another response.

Try to pull out anything that might be constructive criticism and ignore the rest, that's my take on it...

Crumbly Writer

I agree, as you don't want to insult those who wouldn't have been insulted had you not said anything. That's just common sense. But going on the attack alerts everyone that you have a thin skin and that you can't handle comments about your story. If that's the case, then simply turn off comments altogether. If your skin is really that thin, then list in your end-of-story note that 'Please, if you can't say nice things, then please don't say anything about my story at all', as that lets readers know you don't respect their opinions so they won't send those critical messages that many of us enjoy.

On the other hand, I've written many a blog where I simply 'don't get' a response I see from readers. In those cases, I'll specifically write a blog which essentially says 'What Gives?'. Those types of blogs aren't attacks as much as they are 'could you please explain why this one story was popular, while this other one did so poorly?' requests.

While the latter may sound critical of readers, it's more like poling readers to see where your writing skills need work (i.e. if a particular writing technique of yours is falling flat, it's better for everyone if you can identify the problem so you can correct in your next book).

However, I doubt you're specifically targeting that second category.

Replies:   robberhands
robberhands

@Crumbly Writer

If your skin is really that thin, then list in your end-of-story note that 'Please, if you can't say nice things, then please don't say anything about my story at all', as that lets readers know you don't respect their opinions so they won't send those critical messages that many of us enjoy.

Yeah, I'm certain that'll work splendidly.

The worst comment I got so far was "Stop wasting our time with your rubbish". It was a statement in the public comment section, so I thought the critique was mainly directed at the other commentors and didn't feel personally offended. I'm not sure how I'd react to seriously offending feedback but I'm not too concerned about the prospect either.

Ernest Bywater

I guess I'm very different in that I use the blog to provide the readers who bother to read the blog with information about my stories. I don't see it as a place to bitch or a place to make political commentary of any sort.

Replies:   robberhands
Ross at Play

My version of a dummy-spit was to ask that a story be withdrawn because of reader reactions.

I commented here on what I thought about (I presume) Americans with no sense of humour, and how vicious some of them are, but I wouldn't give "my honest feedback" to either a single reader or in a blog or story comments.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
robberhands

@Ernest Bywater

I don't see it as a place to bitch or a place to make political commentary of any sort.

Of course you're very different. Ain't we all? Just not for this reason. Like many authors, I never did that either.

Crumbly Writer

@Ross at Play

My version of a dummy-spit was to ask that a story be withdrawn because of reader reactions.

The advantage of a venue like SOL is that authors, rather than putting a work out there and then having to wait for a stray published review to discover what techniques worked and which didn't, they can get direct feedback about it.

If authors don't like such feedback, they can simply go back to the OLD publishing model, where only your editor criticizes your techniques. Unfortunately, editors, while knowledgeable, typically can't anticipate how readers will respond.

By the way, is "dummy-spit" your equivalent of the "spit take"?

Ross at Play

@Crumbly Writer

By the way, is "dummy-spit" your equivalent of the "spit take"?

No. I thought it was a universal metaphor. Perhaps it's only British.

It means a childish tantrum, especially to the point of being self-destructive. Americans might say 'take your bat and go home'.

BlacKnight
Updated:

@Crumbly Writer

By the way, is "dummy-spit" your equivalent of the "spit take"?


In American, that would be "pacifier-spit", implying a childish tantrum.

edit to respond to Ross's almost simultaneous post:

No. I thought it was a universal metaphor. Perhaps it's only British.


American English doesn't use the term "dummy" for the thing you stick in a baby's mouth to get it to shut up, which kind of kicks the legs out from under the phrase. In American English, it's a "pacifier".

robberhands

@BlacKnight

In American, that would be "pacifier-spit", implying a childish tantrum.

Unsurprisingly, I don't know a similar German phrase. Instead we have several sayings to suggest an opposite reaction. For example:

"Was kümmert es die stolze Eiche wenn sich an ihr schabt ein Borstenvieh."

Ernest Bywater

@Crumbly Writer

By the way, is "dummy-spit" your equivalent of the "spit take"?


It's also often expressed as "spit the dummy" where dummy is the baby's teething dummy or what they call a pacifier in the USA.

Replies:   doctor_wing_nut
doctor_wing_nut

@Ernest Bywater

We don't put our dummies in a baby's mouth - we send them to Washington D.C.

Your way might work better.

Replies:   Remus2
Remus2

@doctor_wing_nut

We don't put our dummies in a baby's mouth - we send them to Washington D.C.


Watch your mouth, you're giving dummies a bad name.

Crumbly Writer

@BlacKnight

In American, that would be "pacifier-spit", implying a childish tantrum.

In 'America', we'd just say "he threw a tantrum". I can't immediately think of a similar American expression, which surprises me for as many outdated and outright silly expressions that we create for every opportunity.

Replies:   REP
REP

@Crumbly Writer

'pitch a fit', but that can be used as expressing justifiable anger rather than childish anger.

Replies:   Remus2
Remus2

@REP

Many a pitch were strewn about, but not one shit was given. ;)

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son

@Remus2

but not one shit was given. ;)


If you can't give a shit, you need more fiber in your diet. :)

Replies:   Remus2
Remus2

@Dominions Son

If you can't give a shit, you need more fiber in your diet.

The definition of full of shit, sans the fiber. :)

Replies:   Darian Wolfe
Darian Wolfe

@Remus2

As far as I can remember, I've only pitched one real bitch and that was here on the forums. It wasn't the fact that someone gave me a one that got me. It was the fact they gave a one without an explanation that pissed me off.

Should I have done it? Eh, seemed good at the time. It felt good and I got to use some insults I had been saving for a special occasion. Can't say it did any other useful thing.

Showing your ass every now and then is ok, but is really quick to start having diminishing returns.

Replies:   Ernest Bywater  Remus2
Ernest Bywater

@Darian Wolfe

I've only pitched one real bitch and that was here on the forums.


Doesn't the term 'Internet Forum' translate as 'a place to bitch about anything?'

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@Ernest Bywater

Doesn't the term 'Internet Forum' translate as 'a place to bitch about anything?'

Technically, it translates as 'a place to bitch about trivial nonsense'. As we've noted, we generally reach a consensus within only a few comments, but then we spent the next 50 comments arguing over minor, unimportant details.

Replies:   StarFleet Carl
StarFleet Carl

@Crumbly Writer

then we spent the next 50 comments arguing over minor, unimportant details.


Well, yeah, of course.

Otherwise, you'd throw a hissy fit.

Although the most recent comment I heard about a childish tantrum was rather more political in nature - quit acting like Hillary after losing ...

Remus2

@Darian Wolfe

Not pointing a finger at you in the earlier post, or in this one. Just a few general comments.

I've been known to get momentarily irritated, but generally don't stay that way long. Conversely, I've noted many people that get upset and stay that way. That's in real time.

On the internet, the majority of people are a scholar, poet, and warrior in their minds. Let us not forget the Socratic Google dissertations with the wikipedia thesis on the side.

Me, I just don't care. Some random person somewhere in the world frothing over their keyboard in manufactured rage, just doesn't trip the sphincter nerves enough to give a shit.

Once in a blue moon though, you just have to fly the finger of discontent, and pinch one off in the shallow end of the Internet pool. It's a much healthier proposition than finding some random stranger in the meat world, and cursing them out while relieving yourself on their leg.

A pitched bitch fit once a blue moon is good for you, making a habit of it, not so much.

writernumber7

For me, the proverbial last straw is the reader who emails, gives me a list of things in the story that they personally disagree with, then follow it with a demand that I do better, change they story to suit their pathetic opinion, and insist I never make that mistake again.

That degree of infantile entitlement deserves a pointed reply.

Replies:   Ernest Bywater
Ernest Bywater

@writernumber7


That degree of infantile entitlement deserves a pointed reply.


True, but it's hard to get a decent knife to travel through the communications lines to deliver the point properly.

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dark Fantasy

When someone publishes something on the internet, they will receive negative feedback. That's just the way the world works.

For reasons that I don't really understand yet, my current story gets me loads of feedback where the previous stories (with similar theme) gave me exactly zero. So I'm very new to learning how to handle feedback. Since my stories are for special tastes, I imagine that I get more negativity than the average story, not that I have any stats on that. But what I'm seeing is that there is also constructive feedback (and some that's just positive), which to me makes it worthwile. But if one can't handle it, they should just disable comments and stay happy.

I read a blog not too long ago that basically said "if you don't beg me, I wont't post any more stories". I don't understand how someone old enough to be on this site could expect anything good out of something like this - on the internet or in real life.

Replies:   writernumber7
Dominions Son

@Ernest Bywater

True, but it's hard to get a decent knife to travel through the communications lines to deliver the point properly.


Given sufficient velocity, a small bit of steel or lead will travel large distances through the air. The hard part is locating the intended recipient.

writernumber7

@Dark Fantasy

In my case, the message came to me by way of the email system and was so authoritarian that I just had to respond and give a little back, as they say.

The guy was infuriated to discover that I rejected his direct orders to rewrite the story to suit his opinions, that he went off on how stupid I was not to agree to his every demand. His was the only email I have ever gotten that I responded to and told him to stop reading my book if it gave him so much distress.

That infuriated him even more. The idea that I didn't embrace his demands and immediately give him what he demanded was truly more than he could imagine.

Ross at Play

@writernumber7

If I recall correctly, there are things the webmaster will do if asked to protect authors from harassment by a particular reader - short of the author feeling obliged to turn off options allowing feedback from readers.

Certainly, the webmaster ALWAYS responds, describing whatever options are available, when contracted by an author with a legitimate problem.

awnlee jawking

@writernumber7

Do you write as 'Number 7'? If so, I'd like to say I particularly enjoyed your recently completed book. The gritty darkness was quite a development from what I'd consider your normal style.

May I ask whether that's what your critic was objecting to?

AJ

Replies:   writernumber7
writernumber7

@awnlee jawking

Nope.
He seems to hate the pace of posting, length of chapters, long format, multiple characters and all political activities.
He thought that young men learning use guns was disgusting and that George Soros was a saint and dwas Mandes all references to him be removed.
Only then would he consider continuing to read the books.

awnlee jawking

@writernumber7

Thank you.

Real life is weirder than fiction ;)

AJ

robberhands

@writernumber7

In that case, you're now in the right place to spill your guts. You'll undoubtedly receive a lot of sympathy.

Replies:   writernumber7
writernumber7

@robberhands

ohhh.... I doubt that.

But ti was nice to spit on the fire for a change. I usually just take it with a grain of salt and go on.

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