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Use of ellipsis and spaces

Mike-Kaye

A brief pause in speech is indicated by ellipsis. But what about spaces on either side of the ellipsis?

"Let me think…the answer is 8 hours."
"Let me think …the answer is 8 hours."
"Let me think… the answer is 8 hours."
"Let me think … the answer is 8 hours."

Is there some official rule? Should 'think' be followed by a comma? Personally, I would use spaces on both sides and no comma.

Geek of Ages

@Mike-Kaye

No comma; the ellipses already indicate the pause.

Either no spaces, or spaces on both sides; that's a style thing (I prefer none, same with dashes)

Also, use the actual ellipsis character, not three periods.

https://practicaltypography.com/ellipses.html

Replies:   REP  Switch Blayde
shinerdrinker

From the top, your third example is the one I like... best.

See what I did there!

I like to thin of it as a sentence going along and then the speaker using a dramatic pause as if the sentence is ending but not quite yet. Then hit them with the space after the ellipsis and finish off the thought.

But what do I know, I'm just a quasi-writer who takes too damn long to write and post new chapters.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
BlacKnight

I use them just like they were a comma or other punctuation mark. No space before, usually a space after, but in some circumstances not.

"Let me think... the answer is 8 hours."
"Let me think..." he said, "the answer is 8 hours."

(Okay, that last is a bad sentence and I'd never write it, but if I were to, I'd punctuate it like that.)

Replies:   tendertouch
tendertouch

@BlacKnight

I agree, I treat it just like a comma (3 dot ellipsis) or period (4 dot version). No space before but a space after. For the same reason I'd use a three dot version with no trailing space (replacing a comma) at the end of a quoted section.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
REP

@Geek of Ages

Also, use the actual ellipsis character, not three periods.


I work in Word. According to Lazeez, Word's ellipse character should not be used. It is not recognized by SOL's text conversion program. I learned of this when a few of my stories that used the Word character created problems in the posted text.

Ernest Bywater
Updated:

@Mike-Kaye

I hate having an ellipsis in a sentence, with the exception of indicating an unfinished dialogue due to an interruption. This is because not everyone sees a mid-sentence ellipsis as break like you indicate, also it has issues with conversion to some display formats. I get around the issue you mention with some narrative like:

"Let me think," he lifts his glass and has a drink before saying, "the answer is 8 hours."

or

"Let me think," he stops for a moment before saying, "the answer is 8 hours."

Yes it takes more words, but it makes it clearer.

Also, to get it to display as intended in some formats you have to use three full stops (or periods as some call them) because the code for the ellipsis symbol isn't always recognised.

edit to add: it ruins the way the story looks when the html code of & h e l l i p ; appears in the text instead of the ... as intended. Not all readers will recognise what the code is meant to display.

wiki page about it too:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ellipsis

Switch Blayde

@Mike-Kaye

Is there some official rule?


No, it's a style.

CMOS says to put a space on both sides. But CMOS also has a non-breaking space between the dots. I think AP doesn't have spaces on the sides (and they don't between dots).

I do it my own way. If it's a trailing off voice, I don't have any spaces, as in:
"xxxxx..."

If it's a pause, I put spaces on both sides, as in your last one.

btw, a short pause is a comma. An extended pause is an ellipsis.

Switch Blayde

@Geek of Ages

Also, use the actual ellipsis character, not three periods.


For SOL, I use 3 dots. I even have to undo Word's automatic conversion to the font's character each time I enter it. Laz says the Wizard converts the ellipsis character to 3 dots. So since it ends up that way anyway, why risk an error?

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Switch Blayde

@Ernest Bywater

I hate having an ellipsis in a sentence, with the exception of indicating an unfinished dialogue due to an interruption.


Interrupted speech is an em-dash.
The ellipsis is for trailing off voice.

Replies:   Ernest Bywater
Switch Blayde

@Ernest Bywater

"Let me think," he lifts his glass and has a drink before saying, "the answer is 8 hours."


You can't write it that way. "He" starts a new sentence and needs to be capitalized with a period before it. But since the period doesn't work because it's a pause, the period is replaced with an ellipsis.

I'd write it as:

"Let me think..." He lifts his glass and has a drink. "The answer is 8 hours."

Ernest Bywater

@Switch Blayde

"He" starts a new sentenc


it doesn't have to be a new sentence, it's authors choice as to having it as one sentence or not. It's just the same as listing different actions.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Ernest Bywater

@Switch Blayde

Interrupted speech is an em-dash.
The ellipsis is for trailing off voice.


depends on the style manual you use, it's an optional choice.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
BlacKnight

Oh, yeah, and I'll sometimes use ellipses to indicate omitted speech, and in that case I put spaces on both sides.

e.g.:
"Let me ... answer is ... hours," the radio crackled.

I keyed the mic. "Please repeat. You're breaking up."

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Mike-Kaye

FWIW, the '0x' part of 0x85 indicates hexadecimal notation or base 16.

I did a bit of research. Word uses 0x85 as the ellipsis character. Chrome, Firefox and Windows Notepad all display 0x85 as a single character. I only checked in Windows 10. (In fixed pitch fonts the dots are rather crowded.)

However, SOL changes … into ... and deletes the period I placed right after the ellipsis. In my only posted story so far, the preface has the sentence:

Also there was that SOL author rule 7...

In my html the line ended with 0x85 0x2E (ellipsis period). The above line ends with 0x2E 0x2E 0x2E.

My bottom line: Use the ellipsis character and let Lazeez change it as he sees fit.

Mike-Kaye

@Mike-Kaye

SOL changes … into ... and


That did not display properly when posted. I posted an ellipsis character and then 3 periods.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@shinerdrinker

From the top, your third example is the one I like... best.

See what I did there!

Don't laugh, I end up doing the same thing often when someone leaves and hanging sentence in the middle of a word. You can't include the extra space, since the words isn't fully uttered.

Example: "I'm in the process of cranking up the thrus... Where's bunny?"

Still, since I use the actual ellipsis character (those who include spaces use all text), that covers it anyway).

By the way, hanging sentences always have a starting but no ending space, though don't ask me the logic behind that decision.

Crumbly Writer

@tendertouch

I agree, I treat it just like a comma (3 dot ellipsis) or period (4 dot version). No space before but a space after.

The ellipsis trumps the final stop (i.e. only three dots, not four). It's the same way you don't add a full stop after an exclamation or punctuation mark. If the sentence already ends in the proper punctuation, there's no point piling on MORE punctuation!

Geek of Ages

@REP

Word's ellipse character should not be used. It is not recognized by SOL's text conversion program


To the best of my knowledge, I upload content with the correct Unicode character for an ellipse, and the Wizard recognizes it quite fine. However, the Wizard appears to change the correct character into three periods and also enforce spaces on either side, which is a more annoying.

At least in my original text, it's correct.

Crumbly Writer

@REP

I work in Word. According to Lazeez, Word's ellipse character should not be used. It is not recognized by SOL's text conversion program. I learned of this when a few of my stories that used the Word character created problems in the posted text.

There was a problem, a few years back, when the SOL converter couldn't handle the html ellipsis character, but that was fixed a long time ago. Try it again, I suspect it'll work now (though with WORD, there's no telling what it's trying to pull!)

Crumbly Writer

@Ernest Bywater

I hate having an ellipsis in a sentence, with the exception of indicating an unfinished dialogue due to an interruption.

You don't use an ellipsis for interruptions, you use an em-dash (it's a usage restricted to fiction, so it's not as well known as the other ellipsis and em-dash guidelines).

After all, you don't want your readers inserting a pause, when they should actually insert a mid-sentence interruption. If readers are accustomed to it (and more and more are, even if they don't think of it's being a rule), they'll process the difference between the two without thinking about it. (Though, of course, several here will object to that assertion. ;D)

Crumbly Writer

@Switch Blayde

For SOL, I use 3 dots. I even have to undo Word's automatic conversion to the font's character each time I enter it. Laz says the Wizard converts the ellipsis character to 3 dots. So since it ends up that way anyway, why risk an error?

By the same logic, why go to all the extra of inserting the three spaces, when that's already handled for you? It's easier to keep your SOL, web postings and publication documents using the same coding so you don't get confused about what goes where.

Replies:   Switch Blayde
Crumbly Writer

@Switch Blayde

"Let me think," he lifts his glass and has a drink before saying, "the answer is 8 hours."

You can't write it that way. "He" starts a new sentence and needs to be capitalized with a period before it. But since the period doesn't work because it's a pause, the period is replaced with an ellipsis.

"He lifts his glass", in this instance, is an "action attribution", and does indeed go on a separate sentence (it also provides a handy pause in the action a normal attribution doesn't convey, as well as interrupting multi-paragraph dialogue speech by a single speaker. The idea is, the action is separate from the speech, and the one action (the comment) is followed by another action (the lifting of the glass), which takes more time.

Crumbly Writer

@Ernest Bywater

it doesn't have to be a new sentence, it's authors choice as to having it as one sentence or not. It's just the same as listing different actions.

If you take that tact, then you'd need to add a comma and an "and".

"Let me think...," he says, and lifts his glass and has a drink."

Replies:   Ernest Bywater
Crumbly Writer

@Ernest Bywater

Interrupted speech is an em-dash.
The ellipsis is for trailing off voice.

depends on the style manual you use, it's an optional choice.

Not really. Certain style manuals ONLY address non-fiction uses, so they don't specify how to address interrupted speech in fiction. That's an omission, rather than a 'different choice'.

By the way, as you can tell, I've spent a LOT of time over the years researching this crap! 'D

Crumbly Writer

@BlacKnight

Oh, yeah, and I'll sometimes use ellipses to indicate omitted speech, and in that case I put spaces on both sides.

e.g.:
"Let me ... answer is ... hours," the radio crackled.

I keyed the mic. "Please repeat. You're breaking up."

That's not viewed as 'omitted text' (such as they'd use if you drop certain words from someone's public comments in a newspaper). Instead, it's a pause (caused by interruptions in the broadcast). Thus they're handled just like any other longer pause.

It's always important to separate out the different rules for non-fiction uses of ellipses and em-dashes from the fictional uses.

Replies:   BlacKnight
Crumbly Writer

@Mike-Kaye

I did a bit of research. Word uses 0x85 as the ellipsis character. Chrome, Firefox and Windows Notepad all display 0x85 as a single character. I only checked in Windows 10. (In fixed pitch fonts the dots are rather crowded.)

Rather than entering hexidecimal values, you can simply enter the html command (which is what WORD does anyway, which is why most browsers handle it correctly). The html command is "…" (assuming it comes out correctly here).

Replies:   Dominions Son
Crumbly Writer

@Mike-Kaye

That did not display properly when posted. I posted an ellipsis character and then 3 periods.

If you check it manually (holding shift and moving the arrow keys), you'll see that it DID come out correctly. The first ellipsis is only a single character, while the second is three characters.

Ya done good, son!

Ernest Bywater

One thing to keep in mind, which some of the posts seem to be missing, is there's a big difference between what is done within HTML and the other display formats, especially the limited allowed codes of HTML used on SoL. The ellipsis HTML codes doesn't work on SoL because most HTML code isn't recognised by the SoL system or it's stripped out to make it work better with the rest of the site. There is some code where Lazeez has gone to a lot of trouble to have it converted by the submission wizard, but not much. Thus, when discussing what print marks to use in a story and what their code is you must be aware that what you can do on your own website is not what you can do on SoL.

Apart from that there are some issues with certain print marks when they get converted to the limited XHTML used in e-pubs and the like. In the past I've seen that problem with the ellipsis and emdash code on an intermittent basis, so I don't use them and minimise using the alternatives of 3 dots and a normal dash. This makes it easier for me to properly prepare a story for both SoL and the epub while it leaves the visual effect looking so much like the intended that the great majority of readers never notice the difference.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Ernest Bywater

@Crumbly Writer

If you take that tact, then you'd need to add a comma and an "and".


I think you meant to use the word 'tack' not 'tact' in that sentence.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Dominions Son

@Crumbly Writer

Rather than entering hexidecimal values, you can simply enter the html command (which is what WORD does anyway


Only if you are using a new enough version of word to support the DOCX format (which is compressed HTML and plain text).

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@Ernest Bywater

Ernest, I've been using ellipses and em-dashes for years in epubs, and I've never had a problem with their displaying incorrectly. I'm guessing that you had an unrelated problem, probably with an early edition of the epub standard—before they worked all the bugs out.

Also, although the SOL Posting Wizard converts ellipses to three dots, oddly, that's not what happens here in the forum, where the html code produces genuine single-character ellipses. I've never quite figured out why Lazeez implemented such a schizophrenic approach, but I'm not gonna complain, cause I'll use them where ever I can! 'D

Replies:   Ernest Bywater
Switch Blayde

@Crumbly Writer

By the same logic, why go to all the extra of inserting the three spaces, when that's already handled for you? It's easier to keep your SOL, web postings and publication documents using the same coding so you don't get confused about what goes where.


What three spaces? Between the dots? I don't do that. For SOL, I use three dots (no spaces between them). For ebooks, I use the ellipsis that comes with the font. I don't have the same stories in both so I don't need consistent formatting.

For SOL, I do a "save as" as txt and attach that file to the Wizard. Since txt loses special formatting, I can't use the ellipsis or em-dash. I use three dots and --, respectively.

For ebooks, I use the ellipsis and em-dash in Word. Calibre converts the docx file correctly.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@Ernest Bywater

I think you meant to use the word 'tack' not 'tact' in that sentence.

Stick a tack in my thumb for every typing such a tactless thing!

BlacKnight

@Crumbly Writer

That's not viewed as 'omitted text' (such as they'd use if you drop certain words from someone's public comments in a newspaper). Instead, it's a pause (caused by interruptions in the broadcast). Thus they're handled just like any other longer pause.


No, it's not a pause. The speaker is speaking, not pausing; the listener (and through them the reader) just isn't able to hear them, so what they're saying is omitted. There's a significant difference in the implications of these two sentences:

"Let me... answer is... hours."
"Let me ... answer is ... hours."

In the former, the speaker is talking with lengthy pauses and for whatever reason not providing the critical bit of information. In the latter, they're talking normally and, though they're giving the critical information, it isn't being conveyed because of technical issues.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@Dominions Son

Only if you are using a new enough version of word to support the DOCX format (which is compressed HTML and plain text).

If you submit to SOL using html, (and export from WORD as html) WORD does it anyway, as it converts all of it's standard formatting into official html coding standards. However, if you post as text and don't go through the conversion process, you're right.

Ernest Bywater

@Crumbly Writer

The forum uses a different database to the SoL story system, and it also uses very different code, which explains that difference.

The problems I saw were when I first started using epubs and they also appeared in some of the MOBI files too, but I switched to using three dots so it hasn't been an issue since.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@Switch Blayde

What three spaces? Between the dots? I don't do that.

Sorry, I meant "three characters", rather than "three spaces". My bad!

For SOL, I do a "save as" as txt and attach that file to the Wizard. Since txt loses special formatting, I can't use the ellipsis or em-dash. I use three dots and --, respectively.

In my case, I submit to SOL using html, so I use the exact same text as I use in my books. Thus consistency across the various versions of the story is important (and easier to maintain).

Crumbly Writer

@BlacKnight

No, it's not a pause. The speaker is speaking, not pausing; the listener (and through them the reader) just isn't able to hear them, so what they're saying is omitted. There's a significant difference in the implications of these two sentences:

I'm not going to argue, but this has been discussed endlessly in multiple writing groups. In fiction, the ellipsis is NOT used to denote omitted text. Whatever a character says in a story is what the character says. If you edited out something he said earlier, then whatever the character reads is what he says.

Likewise, non-fiction writers never use ellipses to denote pauses. If they did, no one could differentiate between a simple pause and edited comments by the speaker.

There are clear distinctions between the use of 'publication marks' for fiction and non-fiction.

By the way, that was edification (explaining the difference intended by authors), and not arguing the point.

Crumbly Writer

@Ernest Bywater

The problems I saw were when I first started using epubs and they also appeared in some of the MOBI files too, but I switched to using three dots so it hasn't been an issue since.

That explains where the problem originates, but Amazon updated the MOBI standard some years ago, and it's now html compliant (though it displays the text differently, in a few instances). As I said, you're avoiding it based on a one or two time difficulty from years ago. Time to adapt, grandpa! 'D

Switch Blayde

@Crumbly Writer

I'm not going to argue, but this has been discussed endlessly in multiple writing groups. In fiction, the ellipsis is NOT used to denote omitted text. Whatever a character says in a story is what the character says.


Except this character is speaking through a transmitter that is breaking up. So the character listening (as is the reader) doesn't hear the words spoken that were lost in the transmission. I think the ellipsis is a good way to represent that. It is a pause because the character hears crackling or something between words. It is omitted words (not like omitted words when quoting someone in an academic paper), but omitted nonetheless because they aren't heard.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
tendertouch

@Crumbly Writer

I'm not going to argue, but this has been discussed endlessly in multiple writing groups. In fiction, the ellipsis is NOT used to denote omitted text. Whatever a character says in a story is what the character says. If you edited out something he said earlier, then whatever the character reads is what he says.


I'll take a different side of this. At least for me the goal of writing is to communicate. If I succeed at that - if the reader understands my intent - then it's fine. The 'rules' of writing are there to help achieve that goal by giving us a shared context but they're only useful to the degree that they aid in the goal of communicating.

As for whether there are three or four dots for an ellipsis that ends a sentence, that's a style guide thing. When I was learning I was taught to use the fourth point to stand in for the period at the end of the sentence, which is why it's eliminated when using the ellipsis at the end of a sentence that ends a quotation. Again, a style guide thing. Either way is fine. In fact any of the ones that I've seen here are fine as long as the readers have enough shared context to understand what the author intended.

PotomacBob

@REP

How do you create the ellipse character in Word?

JohnBobMead

@PotomacBob

Most word processing programs will automatically convert three full stops in succession into an ellipsis, when you are typing the document.

If they don't do that, there is generally a pulldown option for inserting special characters; you end up scrolling through the characters until you find the one you are looking for.

What characters are available will depend upon which font you are using for your document; if there are characters you know you will want to insert, determine which fonts support those characters, and select the most pleasing font that contains all of them.

You might want to investigate which fonts are commonly supported by your target audience's equipment, unless you have a way of including the font definitions with the document. PDF/A allows you to do this.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@Switch Blayde

Except this character is speaking through a transmitter that is breaking up. So the character listening (as is the reader) doesn't hear the words spoken that were lost in the transmission. I think the ellipsis is a good way to represent that. It is a pause because the character hears crackling or something between words. It is omitted words (not like omitted words when quoting someone in an academic paper), but omitted nonetheless because they aren't heard.

Exactly. And it's also a technique (intermittent transmissions) that I've used in a story or two in my time). It works well, especially in driving up the tension before you reveal a new piece of information.

My only objection was over whether it is technically a text omission or a pause is the communications. That distinction was the one I didn't think was worth arguing over, as it won't affect his story in the slightest.

Crumbly Writer

@tendertouch

As for whether there are three or four dots for an ellipsis that ends a sentence, that's a style guide thing. When I was learning I was taught to use the fourth point to stand in for the period at the end of the sentence, which is why it's eliminated when using the ellipsis at the end of a sentence that ends a quotation. Again, a style guide thing. Either way is fine. In fact any of the ones that I've seen here are fine as long as the readers have enough shared context to understand what the author intended.

The forth dot in an end-of-sentence ellipsis is a very recent addition. Before a couple years back, everyone insisted you add the final punctuation mark. I'm not sure what happened, but between my initial research into the subject, and my subsequent research when asked about it here, the guidelines had largely changed across the board, with most sources saying "don't include the final concluding punctuation mark". Before, you'd include any punctuation after an ellipsis, even commas or semicolons.

That's why guidelines are dangerous, because they shift like quicksand under your feet before you can reach the safety of the far side. You do all the research, decide what's the best approach, and bingo-bango, everyone changes the standards between one book and it's sequel!

I don't mind change, as it shows an ability to absorb new ideas and adapt to changing times. But when the changes occur too fast to process, that's when the frustrations arise. And for the French, hundreds of years is much too fast! 'D

Crumbly Writer
Updated:

@JohnBobMead


Most word processing programs will automatically convert three full stops in succession into an ellipsis, when you are typing the document.


They don't do it automatically. Instead, you've got to change the AutoCorrect Options (under "Proofing" in "Word Options"). There's a "Replace text as you type" feature, so it'll insert a copyright character if you type "(c)" or and ellipsis when you type three dots.

As for font selection, most ereaders are much more forgiving than they were years ago, and there are very few uniform width characters in use anymore. That means that virtually all the fonts available (with the exception of the ones you embed in the document yourself) will support publishing characters. Even then, it's easy to check out if you know how.

I'm always using custom fonts in my chapter titles, but I've done it so frequently, I know how to access most of the special features (tails, accent marks, curly-ques, etc.) that are a part of the original font designs.

If you're ever curious, ask and I'll talk your ear off! 'D

You might want to investigate which fonts are commonly supported by your target audience's equipment, unless you have a way of including the font definitions with the document. PDF/A allows you to do this.

Epubs do this too, and it's getting more and more common to include custom embedded fonts. The main sticking point, though, is the liscensing, as most font designers charge you exorbinate rates for embedded fonts (as it's commonly used to add fonts into game consoles, so they charge you as if you're producing a million-game series).

Instead, what most authors do—and what I do—is to purchase a single-use Professional license (which is only valid for your first 50,000 sales), and then use the font to create graphic chapter heads. Easy-peasie, no font-embedding necessary.

Switch Blayde

@PotomacBob

How do you create the ellipse character in Word?


Under "tools/autocorrect" there's a table that converts three dots to an ellipsis, two hyphens to an em-dash, etc. You can add or delete to this table.

Or you can simply enter the ellipsis into Word and it won't have to convert anything. On a Mac, it's "hold down the 'option' and press the semicolon. I assume on a PC the "option" is the "control."

Switch Blayde

@tendertouch

As for whether there are three or four dots for an ellipsis that ends a sentence, that's a style guide thing.


Not according to Grammar Girl:

If you're omitting something that comes after a complete sentence, meaning that your ellipsis has to follow a period, put the period at the end of the sentence just like you normally would, then type a space, and then type or insert your ellipsis. Again, you're treating the ellipsis as if it were a word: the first word of the next sentence. This will result in four dots in a row with spaces between each dot, but this is not a four-dot ellipsis—there's no such thing. It is a period followed by a regular three-dot ellipsis.


The reason she says it's "four dots in a row with spaces between each dot" is because she saying most style guides have a space on both sides and a space between each dot. So it looks like

xxx. . . .

But the first dot is the period at the end of the xxx sentence.

Replies:   Zom
Zom
Updated:

@Switch Blayde


Not according to Grammar Girl:


IMHO, one of the few time Grammar Girl gets it quite wrong. It is style. An overview of all the many different versions of using ellipses should show that clearly.

I recommend:

That an ellipsis is a single character of 3 dots without spaces i.e. …

That if it is showing an incomplete word then it is appended to the end of the word i.e. 'what the fu…'

That if it is showing a missing word or words, as for an incomplete sentence, often indicating a dialogue pause, then it is spaced from the last word i.e. 'What the …'

That it can be used to show a continuation at the commencement of a broken sentence after a pause, usually in dialogue, i.e. '… is what I'm talking about!'

That it can be used to indicate a missing word or a pause within a sentence i.e. 'merry … christmas'.

That the ellipsis is punctuation so replaces periods, commas etc. but can have exclamations and question marks appended, so the notion of 4 dots in a row is redundant.

Feel free to refer to this as the 'Zom style', but it is by no means original :-)

Replies:   Switch Blayde
Switch Blayde

@Zom

IMHO, one of the few time Grammar Girl gets it quite wrong.


Actually, she's not. She talked about the "spaces or not" previous to the part I quoted and said it's a style issue. She said most style guides (not all) have spaces between the dots, but (I think) not full spaces.

The part I quoted had to do with a 4-dot ellipsis. She is correct in saying there is no such thing and gave examples of what looks like a 4-dot ellipsis is really a period and ellipsis combination.

Replies:   Zom
Zom

@Switch Blayde

is really a period and ellipsis combination.

OK, that's clearer, but the 4 dot arrangement only has validity if you are using spaces between the ellipsis dots (bad) and you are not using double spaces between sentences (neutral). It would be quite rare I would think, thank heavens.

Replies:   Switch Blayde
Switch Blayde

@Zom

and you are not using double spaces between sentences


No one does that anymore.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer  Zom  rustyken
Crumbly Writer

@Switch Blayde

No one does that anymore.

Oh yeah? We'll see what the Supreme Court has to say about that! 'D

Zom

@Switch Blayde

No one does that anymore.

You should tell them that. I am proofing same all the time.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@Zom

No one does that anymore.

You should tell them that. I am proofing same all the time.

It's a terribly habit that certain people got into (including many teachers) during the awkward transition between manual typewriters and digital media. Anyone who still insists on using it is clinging desperately to a bygone era which will never return (baring the usual post-apocalyptic world).

Replies:   awnlee jawking
rustyken

@Switch Blayde

I always try to put double spaces between sentences, cause my typing teacher insisted on it.

Cheers

awnlee jawking

@Crumbly Writer

baring the usual post-apocalyptic world


Crossover alert: Naked in the Post-Apocalypse ;)

AJ

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Switch Blayde

@rustyken

I always try to put double spaces between sentences, cause my typing teacher insisted on it.


They talk about what you learned in high school typing in the article: "Why you should never add two spaces after a period." http://www.businessinsider.com/why-you-should-never-add-two-spaces-after-a-period-2015-5

It talks about the larger space character that used to be used by typesetters (not really the same as 2 spaces on a typewriter). They also give the reasons why you should only use one space now, from not having monospaced fonts to HTML ignoring more than one. And...

The Chicago Manual of Style, the US Government Printing Office Style Manual, The Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, and the AP Stylebook are just a few of the style guides that recommend one space after a period.

Crumbly Writer

@awnlee jawking

Crossover alert: Naked in the Post-Apocalypse ;)

Isn't everyone naked during an apocalypse. When the rule of government dissolves, so do the clothes!

Zombie apocalypse movies are more entertaining when everyone (survivors and zombies alike) are all nekkid.

Geek of Ages

@rustyken

Your teacher was unambiguously wrong.

https://practicaltypography.com/one-space-between-sentences.html

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