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Word for Mac

Switch Blayde
Updated:

Something weird is happening.

When I change the view of the document, like from print layout to draft, and save it, it used to remember the view. All of a sudden it doesn't. Everytime I bring it up, it displays in the print layout view and I have to change it back to draft.

Does anyone have a solution?

I'm on 16.9. Just did an update yesterday so maybe that's what's causing it.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer  REP
Crumbly Writer
Updated:

@Switch Blayde


I'm on 16.9. Just did an update yesterday so maybe that's what's causing it.


That's why I don't believe in updates. If an update doesn't address a specific issue I'm having, I won't risk upgrading and potentially breaking something that's currently working. I've had too many apps which I've paid for, where each upgrade takes away vital features. I now pay for an app, and if they take away functionality, I download an illegal copy of an earlier version and use that instead.

No advice on your issue, though, as I'm still on Windows 10.

P.S. You should ask Lazeez, as he's more up-to-date on most Mac issues than anyone else here. My laptop is a Mac, but I do the majority of my work on a hand-built PC desktop.

oyster50

I'm running a MacBook Pro Retina, with the touchbar.

I did the update to 16.9 this morning. I've had no issues, but I do my work in 'print layout' anyway.

Ernest Bywater
Updated:

Switch,

It sounds like it's reset to the original default setting. If the software has a way for you to save a preferred setting, I suggest you set it up how you want, and then save it as such, and see what happens.

edit to add: If that doesn't work try saving a template in your preferred settings and use that for new works.

Replies:   Switch Blayde
REP
Updated:

@Switch Blayde

Switch,

EB's suggestion should work for you.

I run Word for Windows, but I suspect the MAC version works the same. The program always opens my files in the default view. I can change the view and save the file, but when I reopen it, it comes up in the default view.

Replies:   Switch Blayde
Switch Blayde

@REP

I can change the view and save the file, but when I reopen it, it comes up in the default view.


It never used to work that way.

Replies:   REP
Switch Blayde

@Ernest Bywater

It sounds like it's reset to the original default setting.


When I googled it (actually the opposite — for others it kept getting stuck in draft mode), and they said to go into Options and check "allow draft view" or something like that. The problem is, I can't find Options. The way they said to get to Options doesn't exist on my version.

Replies:   Ernest Bywater
Ernest Bywater

@Switch Blayde

I can't find Options.


'Tis been years since I worked with MS Word of any sort, however, the options is usually available from the menu under View or Tools and me be called Preferences or Options. It has varied with versions.

You could also try the old Keyboard Command of Alt and V to see if that opens the right sub-menu.

I got an old MS Word 1 manual that has all the old keyboard commands in it and most of them work in every version of word.

Replies:   Switch Blayde
Switch Blayde

@Ernest Bywater

called Preferences


I had already found "Preferences" under "Word". I went through everything there. The first one was "General" which is what the Google results said was under "Options." It didn't have anything like being able to use drafts as people said.

I checked the option of displaying file extensions so it wasn't a total loss. I wanted that.

I think it's a bug. It's not remembering the last choice for view before you save.

Ernest Bywater
Updated:

Did you come across a Preference or Option setting of - Display as Printed or similar wording. If so try toggling that switch to either on or off, whichever it isn't right now.

edit to add keyboard shortcut of Alt plus D should show you the setting to turn it on or off.

Replies:   Switch Blayde
Switch Blayde

@Ernest Bywater

Did you come across a Preference or Option setting of - Display as Printed or similar wording.


I checked everything. I even checked or unchecked anything that might have done it. It must be a bug in the new release. I'll just have to change the view each time I open it.

Thanks for your help.

Ernest Bywater

Oh well, we did try. Maybe the next upgrade will fix it. report the issue to the developers and wait and see.

Replies:   Switch Blayde
Switch Blayde

@Ernest Bywater

report the issue to the developers


I actually found out how to do that. In the upper right hand corner of an Office product, there's a smiley face you can barely see. If you click it, you get two choices. One to report that you're happy, the other to report a problem.

REP

@Switch Blayde

That may be a difference between Mac and Windows, but I run an older version of Word. Perhaps it is a one of those changes that MS engineers keep making to improve the product (?)and justify their employment.

In my Windows version, options is located under the File menu. It is located at the bottom of the File listing with an icon having smaller text, and easy to miss. This is probably different from your version but I thought I'd mention it.

NC-Retired

@REP

That may be a difference between Mac and Windows


There are significant differences!

Prior to 2007 I was a Windows guy... everything MS including Office.

My last 10 years of work was as a Technical Writer. In mid-2007 we got a new boss and she convinced management to buy our group - 9 writers - new Mac Pros & In Design & Illustrator software instead of the crap we'd been running on our PCs. $75K worth of hardware & software.

The machines were delivered over Christmas 2007 & I came back from my holiday vacation to being dumped cold turkey into a machine and software that I was totally unfamiliar with. It took me just 5 work days to create a brand new from scratch user manual (with illustrations) for a product our company sold.

Within 3 months I'd bought a MacBook for personal use and within 6 months the old PC was never turned on. Within a year the PC was totally disconnected, never to power up again. It's been 10 years and I've never looked back at the POS that Windoze has become.

I noticed that there were significant user interface differences between Office versions... For the life of me I do not remember what they were - but I do remember they were there.

Since my retirement in 2012 I have abandoned All MS products and now run Open Office (http://www.openoffice.org) for all my word processing & spreadsheet needs.

Frankly, I would not go back to the bloatware that Office is. YMMV as always.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer  REP
Switch Blayde

@REP

options is located under the File menu. It is located at the bottom of the File listing


There is no "options" in my Mac version of Word. At the bottom of the File is "properties" which is quite different than options.

The closest thing to "options" is under "Word" (left of "File"). It has something called "Preferences." It has "general" and "view" icons that I thought might have something. They don't.

Crumbly Writer

@NC-Retired

That may be a difference between Mac and Windows

There are significant differences!

Interesting Factoid: Office 2017 is finally going to consolidate the entire Office code, meaning the MAC and Windows system should be identical.

I must say, though, that's too bad. I'm running WORD 2013, and the recovery from a crash on WORD is much better on the Mac. On Windows, I can rarely recover the changes I've made unless I've saved it. On Mac, not only does it not crash nearly as often, but it offers me multiple (every saved version accumulated that day). But then, maybe the newer version aren't as buggy as the older versions (Ha! That'll be the day.)

Replies:   Capt. Zapp
Capt. Zapp

@Crumbly Writer

Interesting Factoid: Office 2017 is finally going to consolidate the entire Office code, meaning the MAC and Windows system should be identical.


Hopefully the don't base it on the windoze version.

REP

@NC-Retired

There are significant differences!


Apparently, my work background preceded yours by at least 15 years.

My first experience with text processing software was on a dumb terminal that connected me to our IBM mainframe. It ran SCRIPT/GML, if I recall correctly, which was one of IBM's text markup languages. On the monitor, all you saw was the formatting codes and document text you typed in. You had to save the file and print it to see how the text was formatted by the codes.

My first experience with Word was Word for DOS Version 2.0. That was a major improvement and it was very different from all the versions you mentioned. We didn't have a mouse or a menu structure, and had to do everything by typing in commands. We saved our work off to 5.25" floppy disks. I can't recall the commands for starting Word (Run Word sounds familiar) or for creating a new file, but I certainly recall many of the commands for creating heading levels, lists, and other division, paragraph, and character formats. Today divisions aren't used; I think they were dropped with Word for Windows.

Ernest Bywater

@REP

Run Word sounds familiar


and when they ported it to MS Windows it became Walk Word, and later to Dawdle Word because the bloat slowed the system down so much.

Remember the old default save setting used to be the incremental save that saved every damn change, so the file grew exponentially until someone told you how to save it as a single version instead of every damn keystroke ever made on the file? I once showed someone the difference and their 7 MB word document file with mega changes over 9 months became a 100 kb document file. They were astounded.

Replies:   helmut_meukel
NC-Retired

@REP

Apparently, my work background preceded yours by at least 15 years.


Nope. Near the same. My first exposure to the 'wonders' of Microsoft was with MSDOS on original IBM PC clone with 640K of hardwired RAM running (IIRC) VisiCalc and (maybe) an early version of Word Perfect? Don't remember fer sure.

Then... Windoze came along and here we are. ;-)

Thinking back on that time... my employer used all MS stuff, but even then I was fascinated with Apple - could not afford it as my employer got us discounts at their clone supplier - but 5 1/4 floppies? Can't remember how much data they held, but I do recall having to break docs into parts so they could be saved onto a floppy. Ah... memories best left in the dust bin of history.

Replies:   sejintenej
graybyrd
Updated:

@REP


My first experience with Word was Word for DOS Version 2.0. That was a major improvement


Word for Mac evolved until it reached version 5.1a, which is widely considered (based on user comments I've read over the years) to be the best version of Word, ever, for the Mac. Of course it was a stand-alone word processor, and not scrambled into the vomit bucket of MS Office.

Those of us who have earned daily bread as wordsmiths have great cause to give thanks that open-source software offered up Open- and LibreOffice, and other sane alternatives.

Replies:   REP
REP

@graybyrd

Open-source software didn't become available until shortly before my last job as a tech writer. At that time and earlier, there was a lot of shareware on the net. Shareware had a bad reputation due to all of the viruses and Trojans that people were spreading. My companies frowned on downloading any executable from the web and even today that is not a great idea even if you have a virus checker.

Microsoft is well known for problems with its software. I'm running Windows and use Internet Explorer to go to MSN.com. It takes forever to open and when it does, I get these messages telling me that there is a problem with the site's certificate asking me if I want to continue. Then there are those long-running scripts that keep me from doing anything on the site. They must run scripts back-to-back for their page doesn't respond to clicks. I open a new msn.com tab and it runs fine for a few moments. The scripts seem to have something to do with new and updated articles being added and with advertisements. Of course the problem seems to clear up about 6-7 PM here in San Diego. That is after quitting time for their dayshift up in Washington.

Replies:   Switch Blayde
Switch Blayde

@REP

Microsoft is well known for problems with its software.


Up until now, Word and Excel have been running great. I don't regret buying them.

However, I opened an Excel spreadsheet for the first time since the update that I believe is causing the problem in Word. The Excel problem is worse. The spreadsheet opens in a tiny window behind the Mac Doc. I have to stretch it to full size every time I open a spreadsheet.

If you haven't updated to 11.9, don't.

Replies:   REP
sejintenej

@NC-Retired

(IIRC) VisiCalc and (maybe) an early version of Word Perfect?

I remember them well, and also Supercalc whicch was easy to adapt and write code for. Computer Associates reckoned that you couldn't change fonts on a spreadsheet - until I demonstrate that you could Then Excel arrived with an impossible macro programming system (unless you had a first in mathematics from Oxbridge)

We actually had most of the then current programs on out PC at home - I needed some because of all the macro work I did at night and my wife had to assess all the programs offered to her huge US company employers. I know I had Visicalc, Supercalc, Excel and I think Wang as well as several other text program were there at the same time - confucious!

Replies:   AmigaClone
AmigaClone

@sejintenej

My parents had a TRS-80 model III clone modified to also use CP/M. I recall using Visicalc and Wordstar on that particular machine.

Replies:   JohnBobMead
JohnBobMead

@AmigaClone

Wordstar


Wordstar 4.0 for CP/M still holds a place of honor in my heart. Wordstar for DOS wasn't so great, and Wordstar for Windows? Ugh.

Of course, that's because, starting with Wordstar 4.0 for CP/M, Microprose ceased developing Wordstar in-house, and started buying up other companies and repackaging their software, so there was no consistent design, no logical development, no longterm vision.

It worked with Wordstar 4.0, because the firm they bought up had set out to develop an improved Wordstar, so it was the next logical evolution of that program. That wasn't the case with their future acquisitions.

I stayed with them longer than most; I actually purchased Wordstar for Windows 1.5, but it was utter trash.

Dad stayed with Wordstar 7.0 for DOS until he died in 2001; it was getting tricky finding supplies for the compatable printer, but he had no interest in learning a new program when it met his needs.

REP
Updated:

@Switch Blayde


If you haven't updated to 11.9, don't.


I'm using MS Office 2010 and it meets all of my needs. No reason to update. If I did, I would go with something other than MS. One of the main problems with MS is their engineers think they know what is good for us users and they just keep going. I for one don't like the direction their design has taken.

2010 proved that to me. Same basic structures but put together and displayed differently and given new names. It is not all bad, but they had to do it their way.

Switch Blayde

@REP

I'm using MS Office 2010


I'm running Word and Excel on a Mac. 11.9 is an update for Mac.

helmut_meukel

@Ernest Bywater

and when they ported it to MS Windows [...]


I had some documentation written with Word 4.0/5.0/6.0 and I tried to take it over to Word for Windows 2.0 but it wasn't easy. I finally gave up and the larger documents remained as Word 6.0 files. Word 6.0 was one of the few DOS programs we still used with Windows.
When M$ changed the version number of the next Word for Windows to 6.0 I hoped they had enhanced the import function for Word 6.0(DOS) files but was disappointed.

I tried Ami Pro (Lotus), because some PC vendors bundled it with their PCs, but went back to MS Word for Windows.

BTW my first PC wordprocessor was Wordstar and on the HP 1000 I used EDIT1000, but that was an editor, not intended for word processing, but the only thing available.

I hated Lotus 123 as spreadsheet, but was happy with Quattro Pro (DOS versions).

Database programming? HP's Image/1000 was excellent, it provided subroutines callable from Fortran, Pascal and Basic/1000.
On the PC I looked into dBase/Clipper but wasn't satisfied.
I finally found the database tools provided by Quickbasic4.5's big brother optimal. MS Basic PDS 7.1 had all database routines necessary and created .mdb files. While VisualBasic for DOS didn't come with these routines (IIRC) it could use them.
When we went to Windows and Access I hoped there was a transition tool to convert the DOS MDB-files into an Access MDB, at least to automatically transfer the data into a manually created Access MDB. We had quite some data in those files. But no, even a call to M$ support was of no avail.

HM.

Replies:   Ernest Bywater  REP
Ernest Bywater

@helmut_meukel

I had some documentation written with Word 4.0/5.0/6.0 and I tried to take it over to Word for Windows 2.0 but it wasn't easy. I finally gave up and the larger documents remained as Word 6.0 files.


One the reasons I started using Open Office and then Libre Office over a decade ago was because I had a lot of older MS Word documents made in the earlier versions the later versions of MS Word couldn't open without trashing them (this was prior to the docx format too). Yet Open Office and then Libre Office could open the files without any troubles or damage. Which meant I could keep the documents as they were.

Crumbly Writer

@REP

I'm using MS Office 2010 and it meets all of my needs. No reason to update. If I did, I would go with something other than MS. One of the main problems with MS is their engineers think they know what is good for us users and they just keep going. I for one don't like the direction their design has taken.

If you mean their 'Ribbon', and their making their various command options impossible to locate, I use a 3rd party plug-in which gives me the full MS 2003 menu options (listed under a separate menu option labeled, you guessed it, "Menu".) There's one MS menu plug-in which works well, and one that doesn't work so well (it's a pay option). That's the ONLY thing which has kept me with M$ for all this time.

Replies:   Switch Blayde
Switch Blayde

@Crumbly Writer

If you mean their 'Ribbon',


I got used to the ribbons. They're actually very usable. And I love the "recent" option to open a recent document or spreadsheet. Saves me a bunch of time.

As I said, I'd buy Word and Excel again in a heartbeat.

The odd thing is, I had a choice to buy it outright or lease it. They said if I didn't lease it I wouldn't get updates. But one day it had me install Auto Updater so I'm getting updates to all the Office products.

Replies:   Ross at Play
Ross at Play

@Switch Blayde

But one day it had me install Auto Updater so I'm getting updates to all the Office products.

According to numerous conspiracy theorists here, they only did that so they could install various bits of spyware in it as well.

REP

@helmut_meukel

I had some documentation written with Word 4.0/5.0/6.0 and I tried to take it over to Word for Windows 2.0 but it wasn't easy.


I can understand what you are saying about the software you used on your job. That was a common dilemma for all of us. My company and boss made the decisions as to what we workers were to use. We workers had to be software compatible with the programs our coworkers used. A lack of compatibility causes problems.

At one of my companies, the engineering community used Word. I was in the Integrated Logistic Support's writing department and we used the engineers' documentation to create our technical manuals and training programs. My boss made the decision to use WordPerfect. The following incident occurred just after WordPerfect 6.0 was released.

We had recently switched to WordPerfect 6.0, and since this wasn't the company standard, our IT group didn't support us. There was a bug in 6.0's print routine that caused me a major problem when I was trying to print the draft version of a technical manual I and the writers who worked for me had written. The printer would not print some of the graphics we inserted in the manual. I didn't know what was causing the problem or how to fix it, so I ended up spending 30+ hours of my weekend trying to get the manual printed. It had to be submitted to our reproduction department Monday morning. :(

I discovered the bug Friday and needed copies of the draft manual the next Thursday to support teaching a class on operating the equipment we installed at Intelsat Headquarters in Washington DC. I had to fly out Tuesday morning. The manual was a key element of the training program in that the training program was to teach the initial group of users to use the displays and procedures contained in the manual to operate their equipment. A condensed 2-day familiarization session rather than in-depth training.

The training ended up being a disaster. I was using the installed system in addition to the manual to show the students the way the system actually worked. The system's software had a number of bugs that had to be fixed. Our software engineers were trying to debug their software and every time they tested a fix, they crashed the system I was using. 20-30+ minutes for them to reboot the system and them crashing the system 3-5 times a day destroyed the effectiveness of my presentation. :(

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@REP

We workers had to be software compatible with the programs our coworkers used. A lack of compatibility causes problems.

As a former IT worked in corporate America, the issue is it's difficult to diagnose software problems if eveyone is using a different version of the same product, or a variety of different products. Thus it's in deference to the IT staff that they insist on a single version of the same software.

Replies:   REP
REP

@Crumbly Writer

The flip side of that is if a company allows its departments to use different programs rather than a single company-standard program, then the company's IT group should support the different programs.

awnlee jawking

@REP

One way of telling a geek from a time-server is that a geek welcomes a multiplicity of applications because of all the learning involved and the subsequent enhanced jobmarket potential.

AJ

Ernest Bywater

@REP

The flip side of that is if a company allows its departments to use different programs rather than a single company-standard program, then the company's IT group should support the different programs.


These sort of policies are in place because of the costs involved in having people trained on the software within the organisation, and the larger the organisation the harder it is to deal with mixed software. But different people approve various things within large organisations.

It depends on who is doing the approval. I once worked in a large organisation where there was a company policy of using only the listed software because the IT unit paid for all hardware and software and support of the listed software. When a couple of new senior managers wanted to use different software because it was what they were familiar with from their previous jobs and they argued it was better a major power struggle broke out at the senior level. In the end the policy was amended to say the company IT unit only supported the following software, and if any unit used software outside of the approved list they would be responsible for maintaining it out of their own budget instead of the IT budget, and if it required hardware different to the listed software the unit wanting the odd software has to fund the extra hardware as well.

The managers who wanted different software were happy with that until they found out their budgets had no money for IT, and in one case the expenditure to do what they wanted would have been a significant cut of their budget. It was amazing, when faced with dropping all of the unit's management bonus budget, travel budget, and miscellaneous budget to get the preferred software the need for that software wasn't so strong. One unit was about to go ahead when they found the change would also include them funding the cost of training in the new software as well. Another unit did switch to using a new program, and then ran into issues when it wasn't able to interact properly with other company used software as easily as the approved software.

Replies:   AmigaClone  REP
AmigaClone

@Ernest Bywater

In addition, to the issues mentioned by Ernest, I expect that the more licenses a company gets to use copies of a particular version of an app the cheaper it might be on a per copy basis.

waynegibbous

I've used a Mac for years with Apple Pages. Then 2 years ago they 'upgraded' it and took away the easy way to link Chapters with the TOC so I went back to Pages '09. But now, hurray, the new Pages 6.3.1 has it back, easy as pie to link and it's better than ever. I use it to write, format and upload to Amazon/Kindle in .epub format and to Smashwords in.doc format with no problems. And it comes free with the Mac.

REP

@Ernest Bywater

Yeah, I saw all of that out over the various companies I worked for. Every company was a little different.

My last company was a startup company, and I got to set the standard for publication word processing and graphic software; we had no graphics department.

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