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desert/dessert waste/waist

Lars14952

a dessert is something you want more of so it has more esses, you don't want to eat a desert: the sand gets in your teeth.
waist is the part of the body below your ribs, waste usually stinks and comes out of the body.
I love all the stories I read here and I don't like to nit pick. It's just these two make me stop when I'm reading and laugh. I put my sword around my waste then finished eating my desert.

Replies:   REP  Ezzy
REP

@Lars14952

Yeah, we authors seem to have a habit of typing the wrong word even when we know better. Then we and our editors read over the mistake without catching it. Readers seem to enjoy letting us know about our mistake, and most of us appreciate it as we kick ourselves for doing it again.

sejintenej

The one which annoys me is stationery (which you write on) for stationary (when you stop writing).

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Ross at Play

There is a website that provides a useful and very extensive of similar sounding words with different spellings.
http://www.opundo.com/homophones.htm

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
awnlee jawking

It could be fun to write a scene incorporating basic mistakes which SOL authors/editors often overlook.

"Are you really going on a date with that looser?" Asked Carol.

"He's quite interesting when you get to know him," Jessica replied, intending it to be a complement.

Carol chocked back a snort of derision. "You've just waved you're rite to membership of the sisterhood."

AJ

Ross at Play

@awnlee jawking

A semen cums too sure.
He meats a hoe. "Wot due ewe due?"
"Four yew, aisle dew strait sects."
"Eye wont moor."
"To hundred dollars."
"Two deer fore me. Buy."

Replies:   awnlee jawking
awnlee jawking

@Ross at Play

I think you made most of those up. Although I recently noticed a 'shore' used in a SOL story where 'sure' would have been correct.

AJ

Replies:   Ross at Play  REP
Ezzy

@Lars14952

By far the worst for me when reading is loose instead of lose.

If your trowsers are loose, that is a manageable situation.

If you lose your trowsers it's much more embarrassing. :)

Ross at Play

@awnlee jawking

I think you made most of those up.

Apart from 'cums', they all exist in the Oxford Dictionary.

Replies:   awnlee jawking
REP

@awnlee jawking

It took me a while to pickup on the errors. It is very easy to miss them.

REP

@awnlee jawking

Although I recently noticed a 'shore' used in a SOL story where 'sure' would have been correct.


In some parts of the US, "sure" is pronounced as "shore"

awnlee jawking

@Ross at Play

But they're not mistakes frequently overlooked by authors and editors.

AJ

awnlee jawking

@REP

That's how it's pronounced in my part of the UK. How else is it pronounced? Shooer?

AJ

Replies:   REP
Ernest Bywater

@Ezzy

By far the worst for me when reading is loose instead of lose.


The frightening thing about this one is how frequently the spell check software in one of my editor's MS Word software wants to change it to the wrong choice. That makes me wonder how often it's due to an author going with a spell check option.

Replies:   awnlee jawking  REP
awnlee jawking

@Ernest Bywater

"Are you really going on a date with that looser?" Asked Carol.


The capital 'A' in 'Asked' is a common fault in SOL stories, but I wonder how many times it's the fault of WP software. When I started using OpenOffice, it tried to insist on converting the 'a' to a capital in that situation. (The version I'm currently using doesn't seem to have that problem.)

AJ

Replies:   Crumbly Writer  graybyrd
REP

@awnlee jawking

Shooer


Webster's shows it as:

ˈshu̇r, especially Southern ˈshȯr

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
REP

@Ernest Bywater

an author going with a spell check option


I always checkout what it suggests. I rarely accept the suggestion.

Ernest Bywater

@REP


I always checkout what it suggests. I rarely accept the suggestion.


I agree. But it wasn't until I spoke with the editor that he learned his system was still at the default setting of 'Auto change' for the spell check in Word, and I told him how to turn the damn thing off because it was making changes on its own. Which explained why he couldn't explain some of the changes he made prior to that.

Replies:   REP
Ernest Bywater

@REP


In some parts of the US, "sure" is pronounced as "shore"


The verbal sound most Aussies make when saying sure and shore is the same. Thus the two words in the sentences "Sure I'll meet you at the sea shore." is the same, just as meet and meat sound the same.

Crumbly Writer

@sejintenej

The one which annoys me is stationery (which you write on) for stationary (when you stop writing).

Or "stationery stationary", for when you stop using stationary.

Crumbly Writer

@Ross at Play

There is a website that provides a useful and very extensive of similar sounding words with different spellings.
http://www.opundo.com/homophones.htm

For when you want to confuse readers, or to recall all the words you never notice you misspell anyway? ')

Autocrit offers an extensive list of ALL the homophones is any given story/chapter. So far, I've never been able to get through more than a couple paragraphs, as it's SO extensive, repetitive and pointless, as there are few actual mistakes.

awnlee jawking

@Ernest Bywater

"What are your Christian names?"

"George Bernard."

"Are you Shaw?"

;)

AJ

Crumbly Writer

@awnlee jawking

"Are you really going on a date with that looser?" Asked Carol.

"He's quite interesting when you get to know him," Jessica replied, intending it to be a complement.

Carol chocked back a snort of derision. "You've just waved you're rite to membership of the sisterhood."

Or, better yet ...

"Are you really going on a date with that looser?" Asked Carol.

"He's even worse once you get to know him, and he 'loosens' up even more!"

Carol stared at her friend in confusion. "Sometimes, I don't get you at all. Why would you stick with him at all?"

"Good point," Jessica says, walking away.

Crumbly Writer

@Ezzy

If you lose your trowsers it's much more embarrassing. :)

Lost trousers (U.S. Spelling) sink relationships!

Replies:   REP
Crumbly Writer

@awnlee jawking

The capital 'A' in 'Asked' is a common fault in SOL stories, but I wonder how many times it's the fault of WP software. When I started using OpenOffice, it tried to insist on converting the 'a' to a capital in that situation. (The version I'm currently using doesn't seem to have that problem.)

I've noticed that. It's because the software sees the final punctuation ("?") and assumes the previous sentence ended.

Autocrit, as useful as it is, is forever listing hundreds of "attributions" that are actually action attributions (i.e. not part of the sentence, but of the following sentence). It severely limits the usefulness of the entire tool.

Crumbly Writer

@REP

shu̇r, especially Southern ˈshȯr

Or more likely: "S'ho nuff!"

But at least, that makes the difference (as a regionalism) easier to recognize, and not just another typo.

Crumbly Writer

@REP

I always checkout what it suggests. I rarely accept the suggestion.

I frequently don't, but I'm always conflicted when it recommends semicolons when I don't think they fit. Guaranteed, if I stick to my guns, a couple editors will mark it as being incorrect again.

It's not always just the software!

Crumbly Writer

@Ernest Bywater

Thus the two words in the sentences "Sure I'll meet you at the sea shore." is the same, just as meet and meat sound the same.

"Sure, I'd like to meet your meat at the seashore!" replied the sailor, winking at me. "I be getting tired of the fishy taste of oysters all the time!"

awnlee jawking

@Crumbly Writer

Obviously hoping you'll mete out some meat when you meet.

AJ

Ernest Bywater

@awnlee jawking

"You've just waved you're rite to membership of the sisterhood."


One must take care to write the right rite when writing about religious ceremonies.

Ernest Bywater

@Crumbly Writer

"Sure, I'd like to meet your meat at the seashore!" replied the sailor, winking at me. "I be getting tired of the fishy taste of oysters all the time!"


So they arrange to have dinner at the Sunny Shores Steakhouse at six that night.

REP

@Ernest Bywater

Yeah, that automatic feature should be deleted from all text processing applications.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
REP

@Ernest Bywater

Many of us in the US pronounce the two words differently.

Replies:   Ernest Bywater
REP

@Crumbly Writer

Lost trousers (U.S. Spelling) sink relationships

Especially when the husband finds them.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@REP

Yeah, that automatic feature should be deleted from all text processing applications.

Better yet, everything written by M$hit should be deleted from the computer, as they haven't added anything of value (aside from the "Review" function, which everyone else also added), since 2003.

Frankly, it's a company lost past it's prime, no longer adding anything of value or products that anyone cares about, continuing to insist everyone continue spoon feeding huge profits into its craw. It's time we called their bluff, and moved on to other platforms (which is why you never see non-paid endorsements in TV shows where anyone uses anything other than a MAC).

PCs have lost all their credibility a long time ago.

Replies:   Grant
Crumbly Writer

@REP

Especially when the husband finds them.

Or the wife finds them in that 'chippie's' apartment!

Ernest Bywater

@REP

Many of us in the US pronounce the two words differently.


I'm not surprised since you can pronounce potato properly or how to properly spell socks. hehehehehe

Replies:   REP  Crumbly Writer
Grant

@Crumbly Writer

(which is why you never see non-paid endorsements in TV shows where anyone uses anything other than a MAC).

Apple doesn't pay for the endorsement as such, they just give them the hardware to use via a 3rd party they use to get their products screen time.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
REP

@Ernest Bywater

how to properly spell socks


S U C K S

How did I do? :)

Replies:   Ernest Bywater
Ernest Bywater

@REP

S U C K S

How did I do? :)


that sucks

StarFleet Carl

Yeah, I just had this happen to me. Had to repost a chapter because I knew that one word was wrong. Spell check isn't worth a damn if you actually spell the word correctly in the first place, it's just the wrong word. (Which is probably why I should never write about any rite after imbibing adult beverages, because I don't get things right. But my waist is not wasting away.)

Replies:   Crumbly Writer  graybyrd
Crumbly Writer

@Ernest Bywater

I'm not surprised since you can pronounce potato properly or how to properly spell socks. hehehehehe

You mean how we "sell spocks"? hehehehe

Crumbly Writer

@Grant

Apple doesn't pay for the endorsement as such, they just give them the hardware to use via a 3rd party they use to get their products screen time.

No, but the only time you see any MS product on a TV show or movie nowadays is because they pay the companies to promote their crappy products.

Replies:   Grant  doctor_wing_nut
Crumbly Writer

@StarFleet Carl

Which is probably why I should never write about any rite after imbibing adult beverages, because I don't get things right. But my waist is not wasting away.

Follow Hemmingway's famous advice: Write drunk, but always edit sober.

graybyrd

@awnlee jawking

but I wonder how many times it's the fault of WP software. When I started using OpenOffice, it tried to insist on converting the 'a' to a capital in that situation.


There's a preferences setting in some WP software that offers to auto-capitalize the first letter beginning a sentence. Perhaps in this case, the program interprets the fragment as beginning a new sentence. Stupid, blind algorithm; the programmer assumes it will be overruled as needed.

Ezzy

@REP

Coming from and living in Georgia I can attest to this. Really though it's only valid in dialog to show the speakers pronunciation.

I treat dialog as a free-fire zone. Write it like they say it.

Replies:   REP
graybyrd

@StarFleet Carl

Spell check isn't worth a damn if you actually spell the word correctly in the first place, it's just the wrong word.


That's been known & recognized since the earliest days; they are called 'spellos.' Again, it's an unfortunate side effect of a blind algorithm. It would require a bit of true artificial intelligence to overcome. Short of that, a sharp-eyed editor, or an author with a dictionary.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@graybyrd

It would require a bit of true artificial intelligence to overcome. Short of that, a sharp-eyed editor, or an author with a dictionary.

If authors and editors, trained in this kind of thing, don't catch homophones, what chance do you think some programmer will have (especially since they're tasked with making writing business letters easier)?

Also, don't forget, M$ has never (well, maybe once, early on) attempted to upgrade their loser spell-check, which is recognized world wide as the source of most errors in electronic communications.

Replies:   Grant  awnlee jawking  REP
Grant

@Crumbly Writer

No, but the only time you see any MS product on a TV show or movie nowadays is because they pay the companies to promote their crappy products.

And giving away their products to the show to get air time would be different, how?

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Grant

@Crumbly Writer

M$ has never (well, maybe once, early on) attempted to upgrade their loser spell-check, which is recognized world wide as the source of most errors in electronic communications.

You really do have issues with M$ don't you?
Strange that the company with the greatest market share of products would have the greatest share of errors in documents, since they are used by the greatest number of people (assuming your assertion is even correct, and even then they could still have the lowest percentage of misspelt words).
And any product is only as good as it's user, certainly it can't be any better. So if the programme makes a suggestion that is wrong & the user picks it, it doesn't say much for the user.
And if it makes a suggestion that is correct, and the user doesn't pick it, it says even less about the user.

Replies:   REP  Not_a_ID
graybyrd

Too much thyme bin waist in hear ranting. Moar abel two bee a wear that awl spell exchequers our knot so good.

Homophones are simply lame; more funny are the rampant 'Malapropisms' running loose in SOL stories. I know of no software protection for those.

awnlee jawking

@Crumbly Writer

trained in this kind of thing


I'm not sure how many SOL editors have had training. The quality seems very variable. On the one hand there are people like Denny Wheeler, to whom I'd be happy to entrust any of my stories. Then there are the authors who credit multiple editors/proofreaders, whose finished products are questionable, to say the least.

AJ

REP

@Ezzy

I treat dialog as a free-fire zone. Write it like they say it.


That is pretty much what I do. It also seems to be the consensus of most of the people here in the Forum.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
REP

@Crumbly Writer

which is recognized world wide as the source of most errors in electronic communications.


Personally, I would blame the users who don't turnoff the auto replace features. Sort of a User' beware situation.

REP

@Grant

And any product is only as good as it's user


That's very true Grant. One of the problems is Word, which I use, overwhelms me with suggestions based on possible alternatives. My usage is valid, but the idiot software keeps prompting me to tell me that I may not have selected the proper word. The same thing with punctuation and sentence structure.

Replies:   StarFleet Carl
StarFleet Carl

@REP

Word


Up!

Seriously, though, I use Open Office Writer. Easy to add those odd names to the dictionary, and it doesn't bitch at me with a lot of suggestions. It'll auto correct some of the simple words that I mess up, and just underline those it doesn't recognize.

Does it have all the fun features that some of the programs out there have? Nope, but it does have one key thing - I was able to download it at work as well, so when I'm at lunch I can still work on my writing.

Replies:   REP
REP

@StarFleet Carl

I was able to download it at work as well, so when I'm at lunch I can still work on my writing.


Some employers do not have a problem with their employees using company property for personal uses such as you described. Some companies object to it.

Those who allow it, may not approve of uses that they deem immoral; I am not saying writing erotic fiction is immoral, but some people think it is.

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son

@REP

Those who allow it, may not approve of uses that they deem immoral;


It has nothing to do with being immoral. If you are writing erotic fiction at work, and get caught at it, that will almost certainly get you fired. Not because it is immoral, but because if other employees are exposed to it, it could be deemed sexual harassment.

Replies:   REP
Crumbly Writer

@Grant

And giving away their products to the show to get air time would be different, how?

It at least shows that consumers are willing to accept your products. The only way most production companies will even accept PC products anymore is if they're paid.

One is good marketing to gain exposure for your product, and one is bad marketing of a terrible product (because it's so obvious).

@Grant

You really do have issues with M$ don't you?
Strange that the company with the greatest market share of products would have the greatest share of errors in documents, since they are used by the greatest number of people (assuming your assertion is even correct, and even then they could still have the lowest percentage of misspelt words).
And any product is only as good as it's user, certainly it can't be any better.

My 'issues' with M$ is that, while I defended them for a long time, I eventually got to the point that I no longer could when they stopped innovating.

The problem isn't that they have a faulty spell-checker, or even that it's dated, it's that, after introducing the concept to the world, they essentially abandoned it as 'good enough' and decided to ignore it's many flaws, rather than continuing to innovate.

When they offered decent products cheaper than everyone else (their PCs, at least), I could support them, but when they churn out products that no one wants, and then force everyone to use them whether they want to or not (thru forced upgrades), I can no longer defend them.

I'm still using a PC, because I had a custom Win 7 machine built a few years ago which still runs like a champ, but as soon as it dies, I'm abandoning the PC world forever.

Replies:   Grant
Crumbly Writer

@REP

That is pretty much what I do. It also seems to be the consensus of most of the people here in the Forum.

Within reason. The rules aren't as rigid, but what the characters say still has to make sense, and there's got to be an internal consistency to it. One character can't talk with a German accent in one scene, and then a Scottish one the next.

Replies:   REP
REP

@Dominions Son

it could be deemed sexual harassment


Only if his monitor was positioned so someone passing/entering his office/cubicle could read what was on the monitor.

Companies, especially the larger ones, have their IT departments do periodic "keyword" searches on their file servers' hard drives looking for words that indicate potential inappropriate/immoral content. There is a morality clause in many employment contracts, that is what would most likely get him fired.

Of course, using a thumb drive would help protect him from such a charge.

I recall helping a coworker with her company-owned computer one day. We were talking about inappropriate content on work computers. I forget why, but I did a search for .jpg files, and found a number of files. I opened one at random and it turned out to be an almost nude photo of a prior employee's wife; the lady I was helping knew them socially. He had quit several months prior and the lady had inherited his computer.

REP

@Crumbly Writer

abandoning


True, and I accepted that as a given.

My post was a response to Ezrick's comment:

Really though it's only valid in dialog to show the speakers pronunciation.

I treat dialog as a free-fire zone. Write it like they say it

Dominions Son

@REP

There is a morality clause in many employment contracts, that is what would most likely get him fired.


The majority of corporate employees below the executive level in the US are "at will" employees. They don't have a contract.

Replies:   richardshagrin  REP
richardshagrin

@Dominions Son

The majority of corporate employees below the executive level in the US are "at will" employees. They don't have a contract.

Some corporation employees are members of a union and do have a contract. Most places the person's boss can't just decide on the spur of the moment to fire a worker. There is a great deal of "process" required, involving the Human Relations (Personnel) Department. T crossing and i dotting are required. It can take days or weeks to accomplish. It can be even harder in government jobs. Getting rid of a cop is almost impossible.

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son
Updated:

@richardshagrin


Some corporation employees are members of a union and do have a contract.


These days less than 10% of US private sector workers are represented by a union.

Most places the person's boss can't just decide on the spur of the moment to fire a worker.


This is more a result of the fact that in large organizations the immediate supervisor doesn't have hiring/firing authority than anything else.

At will employment is not about how much internal paperwork/time is required, it's the fact that an employee can be fired without cause.

Replies:   REP
Not_a_ID

@Grant

You really do have issues with M$ don't you?


I was in the M$ hater crowd, back in the early 90's. I still retain much of the sentiment now. But I think the people with a hard on for MS at this point are aimed at the wrong thing. The Stuff M$ was up to in the 90's and earlier pales in comparison to what Apple and Google can do today.

awnlee jawking

@Not_a_ID

Apple are the world's biggest tax avoiders. They have also somehow managed to avoid prosecution for their price-fixing. They are not an ethical company.

AJ

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@awnlee jawking

Apple are the world's biggest tax avoiders. They have also somehow managed to avoid prosecution for their price-fixing. They are not an ethical company.

I'm sorry, but I can't think of a single company that is. Corporations are not moral entities, and the only ones which pretend to be, try to impose their own ideas of 'morality' on the rest of us, like PayPal.

That's also why we need government regulators, because we can't trust the 'free market' to protect us from scratch (though the g'ovt regulators are usually in the pockets of the corporations anyway, but at least they're pretending to look out for us, rather than aiding and abetting their abdication of responsibility.

Replies:   graybyrd  Dominions Son
graybyrd
Updated:

@Crumbly Writer


That's also why we need government regulators, because we can't trust the 'free market' to protect us


The saying, those who ignore history are condemned to repeat it, applies here. Check this link:

http://www.ushistory.org/us/43b.asp

Hint: the Sherman Antitrust Act was passed in 1890, more than ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-FIVE years ago!

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Dominions Son

@Crumbly Writer

Corporations are not moral entities, and the only ones which pretend to be, try to impose their own ideas of 'morality' on the rest of us, like PayPal.


I hate to burst your bubble, but PayPal's bar on processing payments for adult entertainment sites was not instituted by PayPal's choosing.

The US federal government leaned on them, threatening to shut them down and prosecute their executives for operating a bank in violation of US law.

Pretty much their entire acceptable use policy was dictated to them by the US government.

Replies:   graybyrd  Crumbly Writer
graybyrd

@Dominions Son

Do we take that on faith, or do you have some citations or credible links? I find that statement, "their entire acceptable use policy was dictated to them by the US government" a little hard to accept without some skepticism.

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son
Updated:

@graybyrd

Hard evidence is hard to come by, but there has been evidence out that the federal government was running a secret whisper campaign to cut certain illegal and legal but politically disfavored industries off from any kind of financial services.

https://www.cryptocoinsnews.com/dojs-operation-choke-point-driven-30-industries-bitcoin/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Choke_Point

http://dailycaller.com/2014/05/04/operation-choke-point-raises-alarms/

https://www.engadget.com/2015/12/02/paypal-square-and-big-bankings-war-on-the-sex-industry/

https://www.etsy.com/teams/7718/questions/discuss/14759016/

https://www.paypal-community.com/t5/About-Business/Payment-on-hold-for-quot-government-regulations-quot/td-p/957951

Note it was in 2012 that PayPal instituted it's Acceptable use policy and started purging the accounts of adult sites and operation choke point became public in 2013.

ETA: SOL used Paypal in the past until Lazeeze was cut off in 2012 as part of the big purge.

Replies:   REP  Crumbly Writer
REP
Updated:

@Dominions Son


US are "at will" employees. They don't have a contract.


In many companies, a new employee signs an offer letter and in doing so they agree to a specified salary/hourly rate, a benefit package, and compliance with company policies. I consider that to be a contract even if they aren't senior executives.


At-will employment is a term used in U.S. labor law for contractual relationships in which an employee can be dismissed by an employer for any reason (that is, without having to establish "just cause" for termination), and without warning.[1] When an employee is acknowledged as being hired "at will", courts deny the employee any claim for loss resulting from the dismissal


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/At-will_employment

When an employee is hired as an "At-will employee" the company and employee sign an employment agreement/contract that defines the employee's employment status as "at-will".

Edited to fix quote of DS's original comment

Replies:   Dominions Son
REP

@Dominions Son

, it's the fact that an employee can be fired without cause

True and the employee can just walk away without notice or reason.

REP

@Dominions Son

Hard evidence is hard to come by,


No personal insult intended DS,

But, every time I read that statement, or one similar to it, I equate it to Trump telling the DOJ that the evidence of Obama wiretapping him during the campaign is out there, all they have to do is go find it.

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son

@REP

But, every time I read that statement


There is a lot of general evidence on Operation Choke Point. The the problem comes in when you start talking about specific companies/cases, because the feds were doing everything in secret. They were telling the banks and payment processors to not say anything to the customers they were being pushed to drop.

Dominions Son

@REP

When an employee is hired as an "At-will employee" the company and employee sign an employment agreement/contract that defines the employee's employment status as "at-will".


If worked for a number of corporations, I've never signed anything of the sort. The closest I've gotten to it is having to sign and return and offer letter.

Replies:   REP  Not_a_ID
REP

@Dominions Son

I've never signed anything of the sort.


My daughter was an "at will" employee, and her status was specified in her offer letter. Things may be different in other states; but here in CA, if that employment status is not specified in an employment document, the new employee is not an "at will" employee, and the employee can sue the company for improper dismal.

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son

@REP

Things may be different in other states;


Yep. I live in Wisconsin. Here, "at will" employment is the default unless there is a contract specifying otherwise.

By the way, "at will" employees can still sue for improper dismissal under limited circumstances, if they can show that they were fired for reasons explicitly prohibited by law (racial/gender discrimination), but the burden of proof is a bit higher.

Replies:   REP
REP

@Dominions Son

but the burden of proof is a bit higher.


Here in CA, the employer does not have to give a reason or justification for letting an employee go. If he doesn't say why, it is impossible to prove why the employee was let go, so the courts won't even hear such a case.

Replies:   graybyrd  Dominions Son
graybyrd

@REP

Here in CA, the employer does not have to give a reason or justification for letting an employee go. If he doesn't say why, it is impossible to prove why the employee was let go, so the courts won't even hear such a case.


The same is true for Idaho, which is infinitely more "conservative" than CA. Idaho is also a "Right to Work" state, meaning unions are not welcome.

Ernest Bywater

@Not_a_ID

The Stuff M$ was up to in the 90's and earlier pales in comparison to what Apple and Google can do today.


Take a guess as to who taught them to behave that way! It was Bill Gates.

Replies:   Grant
Dominions Son

@REP

Here in CA, the employer does not have to give a reason or justification for letting an employee go. If he doesn't say why, it is impossible to prove why the employee was let go, so the courts won't even hear such a case.


No, they don't have to give a reason, but occasionally they get caught (overheard) giving illegal reasons internally and such cases do exist, even in California.

https://www.apparelnews.net/news/2017/mar/23/disabled-worker-wins-discrimination-case-against-c/

http://employmentattorneyla.com/california-at-will-employment/

Replies:   REP
StarFleet Carl

@REP

Of course, using a thumb drive would help protect him from such a charge.


Exactly. I don't have a browser open with lots of nude pictures on it - our IT department takes care of not allowing that. I have a document open that a simple mouse click conceals, and that's it. And as long as we do our job and can pass the random drug screen, we're pretty well left alone anyway. You have to REALLY fuck up to get fired - or not do your job.

Mind you, in our industry, the general mentality is that of a junior high school locker room. And that includes the women.

Grant

@Crumbly Writer

The only way most production companies will even accept PC products anymore is if they're paid.

And the only reason they take those Apple systems is because they are given them. They're props on a set, not actual systems in use in most cases (other than the odd one used to provide a screen shot)

Even now Apple computing products are a niche market, the desktop market is around 90% Windows. Mac OS & Linux make up a bit over 5%, a mixed bag makes up the rest. Apple's share of the desktop is actually going backwards, they're all about mobile now.
Even M$ is pushing more & more in to that market.

Even in the server market which was the domain of Unix, then Linux, Windows is actually growing it's market share.

If the production companies weren't given those systems, then you'd be seeing ones the props department was able to get it's hands on. And the majority of them wouldn't be Apple (ref market share above).

My 'issues' with M$ is that, while I defended them for a long time, I eventually got to the point that I no longer could when they stopped innovating.

What do you consider innovation?
Adding more & more features even though only 1 or 2 users might make use of them?

Replies:   graybyrd  Crumbly Writer
Grant

@Ernest Bywater

Take a guess as to who taught them to behave that way! It was Bill Gates.

Steve Jobs was just as good at it without any instruction from big bad Bill.

Apple's business practice have always been on par with M$, however M$ was massive, Apple insignificant. So M$ was the bad guy & Apple the good guy, even though they were no different- just smaller.

Now that Apple is massive, people take more notice of their business practices.

Replies:   REP
REP

@Dominions Son

When I said "If he doesn't say why" I meant never states it to anyone, not just to the dismissed employee.

Of course many people can't keep something like that to themselves.

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son

@REP

Of course many people can't keep something like that to themselves.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a3LEJCXLU28

Donkey:
You're supposed to say "You have the right to remain silent!". No one said I have the right to remain silent!

Shrek:
Donkey, you HAVE the right to remain silent. What you lack, is the capacity.

REP
Updated:

@Grant


notice of their business practices


About 10 years back, I worked out heavily and listened to music while I did so. One Christmas, my wife gave me an Apple MP3 player. I carried it in an armband in a fashion similar to that shown on their ads and the band was often saturated by sweat.

One day, it quit working and I took it into an Apple shop for warrantee repair/replacement. They removed the back and checked the humidity indicator. They told me the warrantee was void because it had been exposed to moisture. I haven't bought an Apple product since.

graybyrd
Updated:

@Grant


What do you consider innovation?

Adding more & more features even though only 1 or 2 users might make use of them?


My notion of "innovation" would be for them* to pause, go back one step, and fix the known bugs & faults in their existing version. Of course, the common business practice is to address the more egregious bugs & faults, and issue a "new version" as a paid upgrade.

*Microsoft, Apple, et. al.

Speaking of which, has anyone paid particular attention to MS effective crippling of the security patch updates for Windows 7? Sixteen hours, where it used to take only minutes; and the 'security updates' are little more than additional forced updates to data reporting telemetry and Windows 10 downloads. Unless "automatic updates" is turned off, MS is destroying Windows 7 installations by degrees.

Replies:   Ernest Bywater  REP
Ernest Bywater

@graybyrd

Unless "automatic updates" is turned off, MS is destroying Windows 7 installations by degrees.


Part of their long term plan to shift everyone over to monthly rental software working over the Internet.

awnlee jawking

@Not_a_ID

The Stuff M$ was up to in the 90's and earlier pales in comparison to what Apple and Google can do today.


I recall Dell selling Linux PCs for more than their M$ equivalents despite not having to pay for the software because of M$ threats not to supply them with Windows etc.

And M$ bribed Bush into stopping the attempt to split them up.

AJ

Replies:   Capt. Zapp
Not_a_ID

@Dominions Son

If worked for a number of corporations, I've never signed anything of the sort. The closest I've gotten to it is having to sign and return and offer letter.


I've signed paperwork acknowledging I was an "at will" employee for every job I've worked since the Navy.

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son

@Not_a_ID

I've signed paperwork acknowledging I was an "at will" employee for every job I've worked since the Navy.


Where I live, at will employment is the default as a matter of law.

Capt. Zapp

@awnlee jawking

I recall Dell selling Linux PCs for more than their M$ equivalents despite not having to pay for the software because of M$ threats not to supply them with Windows etc.


I have a Dell laptop that came with Win Vista. When the hard drive failed recently, I attempted to install Linux (Ubuntu) on the new drive. When I couldn't get that to work I tried to install Win XP, which also failed. I finally contacted Dell support who informed me that the ONLY operating system the laptop would run on was VISTA as it was keyed in the BIOS! Furthermore, since I had done a BIOS update at the recommendation of the Dell support site, they could no longer retrieve the Win Vista key from the BIOS for me to reinstall using the old key (The label has long since worn down) and recommended I contact M$. M$ of course said they no longer support Vista and recommended I purchase a new laptop. I finally contacted my local PC guru who provided me with a key for Vista. Even that didn't work until I found the correct version of Vista. It took almost a month for me to get the dang thing up and running again.

For those wondering why I went through the trouble, I have various games and other software that do not run on anything newer than Vista, even if I use compatibility mode or emulation software.

Replies:   awnlee jawking  graybyrd
REP

@graybyrd

has anyone paid particular attention to MS effective crippling


I still run Windows and have MSN as my homepage. Has anyone else noticed MS having problems linking to their homepages. I keep getting "MSN cannot respond" error messages. Once they do respond, I get "website X does not respond" error messages. Not to mention that when I a link opens and I try to page down, I get "MSN not responding due to a long running script" messages.

Personally, I think Windows has become buggier than hell. Most likely caused by so many patches. It needs a complete overhaul. The long running script is usually me sitting for 1-2 minute while the ads are downloaded to my computer. If ads take so long to download, they should fix the script so I can scroll down while the ads download; some process similar to streaming.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
doctor_wing_nut

@Crumbly Writer

the only time you see any MS product on a TV show or movie nowadays is because they pay the companies to promote their crappy products.


They also got a nice promo boost when Belichick slammed his Surface tablet to the surface of the sideline in disgust.

You just can't buy endorsements like that. ;-)

Crumbly Writer

@graybyrd

Hint: the Sherman Antitrust Act was passed in 1890, more than ONE HUNDRED TWENTY-FIVE years ago!

Ah, the Sherman Antitrust Act, which officially revoked our trust in tanks. 'D Maybe that's why you never see them in stories or movies anymore.

Crumbly Writer

@Dominions Son

I hate to burst your bubble, but PayPal's bar on processing payments for adult entertainment sites was not instituted by PayPal's choosing.

Excuse me, but PayPal led the charge against adult sites of their own volition, rather than playing catch-up after the fact. They were routinely critiqued for their approach, but declared that they didn't care, since it was based on their [leader's] religious views.

Replies:   Dominions Son
Crumbly Writer

@Dominions Son

Hard evidence is hard to come by, but there has been evidence out that the federal government was running a secret whisper campaign to cut certain illegal and legal but politically disfavored industries off from any kind of financial services.

The whole 'bit coin' conflict arose much later than the initial PayPal/Adult Entertainment fight. They're essentially two different arguments. (Though not that I review your message--which I was sure included a 'bit coin' reference--I see didn't.)

Crumbly Writer

@Grant

And the only reason they take those Apple systems is because they are given them. They're props on a set, not actual systems in use in most cases (other than the odd one used to provide a screen shot)

Please, let's NOT restart the entire PC vs. Apple arguments from the '90s. I was sick of it at the time, and I'm not eager to repeat all the same old arguments now.

If you prefer PCs, then I have no objection to your using them. However, although my sticking with, and continually defending them, I've lost faith in M$ to offer anything of value, so I've joined those railing against them because they no longer offer anything I can defend them with.

'Nuff said. It's assumed we'll disagree with each other no matter which arguments we offer. I dislike M$, you still like them.

Replies:   Capt. Zapp
Dominions Son

@Crumbly Writer

Excuse me, but PayPal led the charge against adult sites of their own volition, rather than playing catch-up after the fact. They were routinely critiqued for their approach, but declared that they didn't care, since it was based on their [leader's] religious views.


And yet if you look at the acceptable use policy and compare it to the few government documents regarding operation Choke Point that have become public, every forbidden category is something that was on the operation Choke Point target list.

As to them being out front, the Feds leaned on them first, before going after the credit card companies.

Crumbly Writer

@REP

Personally, I think Windows has become buggier than hell. Most likely caused by so many patches. It needs a complete overhaul.

M$ has always been "buggier than hell". Whereas Apple has always focused on "better design", M$ has focused on 'making it good enough for the masses'. However, once upon a time, they focused on innovation as a driver of sales, but they've given up on any 'new sales', and instead focus on continued business sales, since everyone is giving up on new PCs in favor of tablet and phones instead.

Replies:   REP  Grant
REP

@Crumbly Writer

M$ has always been "buggier than hell".


I meant even buggier than usual.

Remember, people screaming about DOS being so bad. MS brought out a new product called Windows. People stopped screaming so much. What most of them did not realize was Windows was just and interface for running DOS. It is still an interface and it still runs DOS.

awnlee jawking

@Capt. Zapp

as it was keyed in the BIOS!


To prove my ignorance to the experts, can't the BIOS be edited? After replacing the battery in a Dell, it used to try to boot initially from the non-existent floppy drive. It's a known bug with Dells and the fix is to edit the BIOS to remove the A: drive from the top of the list. Or just press the right function key to skip over the error message every time.

AJ

Replies:   Capt. Zapp
Capt. Zapp

@Crumbly Writer

If you prefer PCs, then I have no objection to your using them.


For me it is not a question of which I prefer, but which I can afford.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Capt. Zapp

@awnlee jawking

To prove my ignorance to the experts, can't the BIOS be edited?


There are areas of the BIOS that can be edited such as boot sequence, however the Windows Vista key that shipped with the laptop was not even view-able in the BIOS setup. Had I not updated the BIOS, Dell could have retrieved the key for me and I could have used it to reactivate Vista. Once I did the recommended update, the key was no longer accessible resulting in M$'s recommendation I 'buy a new computer'.

It's all good now though. I have a valid key AND a valid validation code which will allow me to reinstall Vista as long as I have a need to do so.

graybyrd

@Capt. Zapp

I finally contacted Dell support who informed me that the ONLY operating system the laptop would run on was VISTA as it was keyed in the BIOS!


Somehow that doesn't sound right... I mean, I've heard of the EFI collusion betwixt MS and Intel which "protected" the CPU from running anything other than Windows OS, and that can be worked around... but to "key lock" the BIOS to a particular version of Windows, and an individual authorization key? This is the first I've heard of it.

I'd call Dell again, and tell them to provide a means for unlocking that BIOS so you can install the OS of your choice! Failing that, do a net search for Dell + BIOS + keylock ?

Another approach: now that you have Vista reinstalled & working, download your choice of Linux and do a "dual boot" install. (Directions will be on the Linux website) Then, at boot time, you have a choice: Linux, or Windows.

One of the best bargains these days is a good used Windows laptop; wipe the drive, and install Linux. I prefer IBM or Lenovo "Thinkpads" ... they're excellent machines.

Crumbly Writer

@Capt. Zapp

For me it is not a question of which I prefer, but which I can afford.

That's understandable. Macs are incredibly expensive, though given their much longer lifetime, and the reduced crashes and failures, the costs supposedly even out over time. However, there's also the cost of familiarizing yourself with an entirely new tool, something I'm still working through. I still use my Win 7 PC 95% of the time, simply because I'm more productive on it.

When it finally dies, it'll be a difficult final adjustment.

Replies:   graybyrd  John Demille
graybyrd

@Crumbly Writer

When it finally dies, it'll be a difficult final adjustment.


Truth told, it [should] boil down to the applications. The operating system doesn't produce the work. So, if you've got a suite of apps that you prefer, find a way to keep the OS of choice running. Even on a replacement PC.

But, if you're willing to switch over & learn different apps, then seriously consider what's available on a new OS, such as Linux or Mac.

Linux can be loaded on [most] any PC, used or new. There's lots of great apps on Linux, free for installing, but do they match your needs? Also, seriously consider installing Linux in 'dual boot' mode alongside your current Windows, to get familiar & ease an eventual switch-over.

Mac OS has slip-slided away from its user base, rushing head-long into iOS Slab-Land. And [IMHO] Apple has taken a notoriously fast-paced path of forced obsolescence that demands great ca$h outlays to keep pace.

Best bet with Mac [but only if you're already familiar with Macs, or are willing to learn new & acquire new apps] is to buy a good used Mac. This guarantees maximum bang for the buck, and used Macs do keep on running.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
John Demille

@Crumbly Writer

I still use my Win 7 PC 95% of the time, simply because I'm more productive on it.

When it finally dies, it'll be a difficult final adjustment.


That's the wrong way to transition onto a new platform. You're wasting that Mac that you have. While I do understand the reluctance to give up something familiar, no matter how awful it is compared to the unfamiliar, but such a transition sometime requires some tough love, or a cold turkey jump. Moving away from Windows is much like quitting smoking:a gradual move takes a very long time and most times leads to failure.

I've had friends move to the Mac and the ones that failed or took the longest to make the move were the ones that kept using their windows boxes out of familiarity or perceived productivity advantage. If you don't force yourself to rely solely on the Mac, then you won't take advantage of what the Mac has over windows. Usually, a cold turkey transition phase is about 20 days. If you can force yourself to not jump back to your PC for 20 days, then you won't go back to the PC because you won't need to and you'll be much more comfortable on the Mac.

Usually, if you make the transition before you're actually forced (by the death of the PC), then it's mentally easier to accomplish.

I made the transition cold turkey style way back when in 2005.

Crumbly Writer

@graybyrd

Truth told, it [should] boil down to the applications. The operating system doesn't produce the work. So, if you've got a suite of apps that you prefer, find a way to keep the OS of choice running. Even on a replacement PC.

Macs (and Linux) support most common programs, including OpenOffice, Calibre and most writing tools. Macs also allow dual booting, which helps ex-PC users.

@John Demille
That's the wrong way to transition onto a new platform. You're wasting that Mac that you have. While I do understand the reluctance to give up something familiar, no matter how awful it is compared to the unfamiliar, but such a transition sometime requires some tough love, or a cold turkey jump. Moving away from Windows is much like quitting smoking:a gradual move takes a very long time and most times leads to failure.

My main issue is that I bought a Mac laptop when my old laptop died and I got sick of constantly replacing/reinstalling them. However, my main desktop was custom build, and works like a sturdy stallion, thus I prefer the full screen, fully powered system over the smaller laptop. I know I can attach the laptop to a larger display, but I still prefer the larger systems on a sit down desk.

Grant
Updated:

@Crumbly Writer

Please, let's NOT restart the entire PC vs. Apple arguments from the '90s. I was sick of it at the time, and I'm not eager to repeat all the same old arguments now.


I would love to leave it alone, but when people spout nonsense such as this,

M$ has always been "buggier than hell". Whereas Apple has always focused on "better design", M$ has focused on 'making it good enough for the masses'.

and this steaming pile of nonsense

Macs are incredibly expensive, though given their much longer lifetime, and the reduced crashes and failures,


Not responding is often taken as agreement, and i can't agree when people spout nonsense.

If you can avoid making such statements, then I will be able to restrain myself from commenting on them.

Perv Otaku

http://www.homophone.com/

Replies:   Ernest Bywater
Ernest Bywater

@Perv Otaku

Perv Otaku
04/04/2017, 7:41:22 pm

http://www.homophone.com/


Isn't that the special help phone line?

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