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Odd spelling??

sejintenej
Updated:

From time to time I see "different" spellings which could be US English or typos. Usually I have seen them enough to know the USA spelling or it has been referred to in the Forum but here goes;

Carl has just demonstrated that he can handle a gun and the conversation has turned towards hand-to-hand:

"Carl also sais he knows how to fight"

Sais = says or USA spelling?

American or typo?

edited to give more context

Ernest Bywater

@sejintenej

I'd bet on a typo, but you never know with them folks from the USA. After all, they give a place the name of a dance club, then go there to eat pancakes.

Dominions Son

@sejintenej

Definitely a typo.

could be either says or said.

Switch Blayde

@sejintenej

typo

Ernest Bywater

@Dominions Son

could be either says or said.


's' is right beside 'd' on the most common English keyboards, so it's likely a miss-hit key.

Replies:   awnlee jawking
Ross at Play
Updated:

@sejintenej

Sais = says or USA spelling?

That is flat out wrong in every version of English.
EDIT TO ADD
Given the location of D next to S, I would assume a typo, not ignorance.

Replies:   Capt. Zapp
Capt. Zapp

@Ross at Play

That is flat out wrong in every version of English.


So yous sais. :)

sejintenej

Thanks all. That author is generally pretty good but he must have been having a bad day , especially later in that chapter.

Ernest Bywater

@sejintenej

If it was one of mine, please let me know where, so I can fix it.

awnlee jawking

@Ernest Bywater

So perhaps it should be Dominions Don ;)

AJ

Crumbly Writer

@Dominions Son

Definitely a typo.

could be either says or said.

Or slaid, given how clear the original was.

Crumbly Writer

@sejintenej

That author is generally pretty good but he must have been having a bad day , especially later in that chapter.

Very often, many typos go by unnoticed for long periods. We've all seen traditionally published books with multiple typos, so it's not for lack of editors or trying. We've discussed this tendency (of authors and editors to see what they expect, rather than the actual words on the page) before. That's why I insist on using multiple editors, because each catches entirely different errors.

Replies:   sejintenej
docholladay

@sejintenej

Sais = says


Has to be a typo. I have seen similar errors in many stories, but usually they are not important.

Then there are the times when words are spelled right, but their meanings are completely different.
For example: Plains/Planes or Pane/Pain

Both words are spelled correctly regardless of which version of English is being used but their meanings are definitely different. Those errors I put down to the probable usage of the converter programs like JAWS which was a major one for blind users (I am not sure but it might still be one of the top programs). Those programs go by sound and a spell checker will not catch the error. There are other similar programs with the same error problems. If its a major one I send a private note to the writer quoting a sentence or paragraph to help locate the error. Sending a suggested substitute word. But like always its their story and their decision.

StarFleet Carl

@sejintenej

I did not sais I know how to fight.

Typo.

Keyboard gamers know WASD is your friend.

sejintenej

@Crumbly Writer

Firstly the author does not contribute to the Forum under his/her author pen name.

So far as he admits there is only one editor (to whom he expresses his thanks)

That chapter appeared in June or July last year - the story continues and has exceeded 300 pages! There has been plenty of room for typos but as I indicated he is generally pretty good.

As for pointing out queries to authors I am in two minds. Many stories I read are actually several years old and, with the passage of time and their continuing writing, I do wonder whether most authors can be bothered.
On one occasion I sent a list of perhaps 30 "errors" in part of one chapter and received a nice note of thanks. So, I sent the list of the errors in the second half of the chapter and indicated that if he wished, I would be happy to look for similar errors prior to publishing. No answer so I suspect that he did nothing - I haven't checked. (By errors, they were 90+% spelling mistakes but there might have been the odd query about tense - I avoid comma queries and I am far less "direct" compared to my comments here.

Only very occasionally do I comment to authors - a few have come back very pleasantly, some very "directly" and some not at all.
Ernest; I've just finished one of your stories (2nd or 3rd time) but didn't notice anything astray.

Ernest Bywater

@sejintenej

Ernest; I've just finished one of your stories (2nd or 3rd time) but didn't notice anything astray.


Good, that means they're well hidden, even if it's by accident.

Some authors don't want to hear about errors, while some do - I'm one who wants to be informed so I can fix the problems.

Crumbly Writer

@sejintenej

As for pointing out queries to authors I am in two minds. Many stories I read are actually several years old and, with the passage of time and their continuing writing, I do wonder whether most authors can be bothered.

You get all types of authors. While many are eager to correct any and all errors, regardless of how old the story is, others simply don't want to be bothered, considering stories finished and done once they post them. The lesson here is: you can't draw conclusions based on how one or two respond, as each author is different.

Generally, it's bad news to start with a list of 30 errors, as it's intimidating, and it comes across as bitching about the quality of the story. Typically, I'll start by telling the author why I appreciate their work, then conclude by one or two typos I noticed. If they respond positively, I'll send a few more, noting whether they actually change anything or not. (They're not obligated to, but how they respond tells you how they deal with suggestions. I'll normally tell helpful readers how I resolve issues raised.)

Generally, authors won't ask for help until they've gotten several messages from you, and your advice is routinely helpful. If so, then they'll very often ask for more. But again, not everyone does that. One clue, I specifically request corrections in my 'End of Story' notes.

Replies:   Ross at Play
Ross at Play

@Crumbly Writer

it's bad news to start with a (long) list of errors, as it's intimidating, and it comes across as bitching about the quality of the story.

When an author reacts negatively I conclude I will not be bothered with anything by an author who lacks pride in the quality of their work.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Wheezer

@Ernest Bywater

After all, they give a place the name of a dance club, then go there to eat pancakes.


Hint: It's an acronym...

Replies:   Ernest Bywater
Ernest Bywater

@Wheezer

Hint: It's an acronym...


I know that, however, I've seen the name just given out in dozens of stories, and only once did a US author list to full name - thus people not familiar with the business (the majority of the World's population) have to guess at what it is.

Replies:   Wheezer
Dominions Son

@Ernest Bywater

After all, they give a place the name of a dance club, then go there to eat pancakes.


It's not a dance club, it's Apple fitness gear. :)

Replies:   REP
awnlee jawking

@Ernest Bywater

They named it after an American Indian tribe, but rotated the letters one place to avoid claims of cultural appropriation ;)

AJ

Wheezer

@Ernest Bywater

(the majority of the World's population) have to guess at what it is.

If anyone asks, tell them it is where all the one-legged waitresses work...

REP

@Dominions Son

it's Apple fitness gear.


:)

Crumbly Writer

@Ross at Play

When an author reacts negatively I conclude I will not be bothered with anything by an author who lacks pride in the quality of their work.

My point wasn't passing judgement on the author, but pointing out that it's more polite focusing on the positive, rather than the negative. No one likes to hear why you HATE a story. They're more inclined to respond positively if you appreciate the work, however they respond (you can still be polite while seething).

Bondi Beach

@Ernest Bywater

After all, they give a place the name of a dance club, then go there to eat pancakes.


For the record, their non-pancake breakfasts are pretty good. As for the pancakes themselves, my wife---a pancake expert---gives them a pretty good grade.

bb

richardshagrin

Perhaps fiction authors should send characters to a fictional restaurant rather then IHOP (International House of Pancakes). I recommend Pancakes Plus as the fictional location. A possible acronym could be PP, also useable for Piss Poor.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@richardshagrin

erhaps fiction authors should send characters to a fictional restaurant rather then IHOP (International House of Pancakes).

Pancakes-R-Us? Pancakemart? Pankmart?

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son

@Crumbly Writer

Pancakes-R-Us? Pancakemart? Pankmart?


International Flapjack House :)

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
richardshagrin

This is a quote from Lazlo Zelazac's "Service Society":

"Will said, "I want to talk to you."

"I'll meet you at the International Cabana of Pancakes in an hour. I've got to get cleaned up," Dexter said, pointing to a building at the edge of the parking lot."

Crumbly Writer

@Dominions Son

International Flapjack House :)

International Flop House, or iFLOP, as an abbreviation?

Replies:   Capt. Zapp
Wheezer

Casa de panqueques?

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Capt. Zapp

@Crumbly Writer

International Flop House, or iFLOP


Sounds like the name of a two-bit (extremely cheap) hotel.

Crumbly Writer

@Wheezer

Casa de panqueques?

I love that one. I'll have to remember it (if I ever set a story in a Spanish speaking environment).

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