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Forum: Bug Report and Feature Requests

Link to Forum?

Lugh

In the new page reached from "authors/editors", in a tablet-like layout, I can't find a link to Forum. Is that a bug or feature?

I had Forum bookmarked, and, since it seems active, I didn't think it had been taken down.

Replies:   REP  REP
Ernest Bywater

in the thread about the redesign

http://storiesonline.net/d/s1/t1612/authors-editors-page-redesigned

Lazeez explains why the grey links for everything line isn't being put on each page due to the extremely low usage of it from anywhere but the Home page. If it doesn't get enough use, then he can save the download and real estate by cutting it and let people go back to the home page to go to another section.

REP

@Lugh

Is that a bug or feature?


To a marketer, all bugs are features. :)

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
REP

@Lugh

Is that a bug or feature?


To a marketer, all bugs are features. :)

Crumbly Writer

@REP

To a marketer, all bugs are features. :)

But to a bug, all the features of a facility are consumables, which help degrdade the premises.

richardshagrin
Updated:

There are some bugs, like mayflies, that don't consume nourishment, they only live a day, to breed, produce eggs, and thus get the hatched eggs into larvae on the way to caterpillar which eventually (and it may be 17 years for locusts) become the final form. There are lots of different kind of bugs. Some even aren't insects.

"Bug - Wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bug

Biology. Formally, an insect of the order Hemiptera, also known as the "true bugs" Informally, a land invertebrate; A pathogen, any microorganism that causes illness."

Wikipedia lists lots of other kinds of bugs, but leaves out Bugs Bunny. "What's up doc?"

Crumbly Writer

Though technically not bugs, they've just discovered that the common swift (a 5" bird), spends an entire 8 - 10 months of every year in flight, without ever landing. They couldn't document it, because the poor bird is too small to plant electrodes in their brains, but it's thought they raise to a high altitude, set their wings to glide, and sleep as they gradually descend.

Being so small, they're vorocious feeders, and spend most of their time aloft eating, as well as using thermal drafts to conserve energy.

Fascinating buggers, even with those damn feathers!

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