Home « Forum « Lost Stories

Forum: Lost Stories

Lost story about academy of magic/mind-control

z_1

Young outsider boy in college (?academy) of magic/mind-control. Part of curriculum is one-on-one mind battles with loser being a slave to winner? Post-apocalyptic world of "techists" and "mages"? Mirrors that talk?

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son
Updated:

@z_1

I know what story you are talking about, but for the life of me I can't remember the title.

Magic wielding families were matriarchal because women tended to have stronger magic. The MC was born to a technist clan but could wield magic, and he understood both. The mirror was a form of AI created using both magic and tech. The MC found the mirror in storage, in a non-functional state and was able to repair it because he understood both tech and magic.

I am sure that I read the story on http://www.mcstories.com, but I can't find it now.

awnlee jawking

I'm very unsure whether it's the one being sought but UC:Fates by amaranth immediately sprang to mind.

AJ

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son

@awnlee jawking

I'm very unsure whether it's the one being sought but UC:Fates by amaranth immediately sprang to mind.


http://mcstories.com/UCFatesOne/index.html

Yes, that's the one.

Replies:   richardshagrin
richardshagrin

@Dominions Son

My, that's a long one, 7 acts, each of 3 or 4 chapters, 35,000 to over 40,000 words per act. I'd estimate over 250,000 words. If anyone reads it, let us know what you think about it. I won't hold my breath, likely it will take a long time to read all of it.

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son

@richardshagrin

I've already read it. I like it.

z_1

Thanks a lot, exactly what I was looking for!

BlinkReader

Thank you guys o pointing me to really good story.

It was so good that I couldn't stop reading it till the end, and can really recommend it as good read :)

Replies:   richardshagrin
richardshagrin

@BlinkReader

Have any of you read other stories by the same author?

Amaranth is a purple-red color. When Murat was King of Naples at the end of the Napoleonic Wars, his troops uniforms had Amaranth-red facings. I believe one reason was so that when the troops were bleeding it was harder to see they were injured, the facing color and blood were similar. I also understand British uniforms were red so the blood was harder to see.

I wonder if the author chose the pen name for similar reasons to Murat? The story under discussion had lots of violence.

Dicrostonyx

@richardshagrin

I also understand British uniforms were red so the blood was harder to see.


This is a modern myth of unknown origin. British uniforms have been red since 1645, and there were occasional uses of the colour for at least two centuries prior to that, such as the Yeoman of the Guard (1485).

It's possible that the colour was taken from the coat of arms of one of the royal families, but it might just have been economics. There's a 1594 ordinance stating that coats "be of such colours as you can best provide".

Dominions Son

@richardshagrin

Have any of you read other stories by the same author?


I've read a couple, most a straight male dominant. The are also mostly much shorter than UC:Fates.

This link will give you all the stories by that author at mcstories.com

http://mcstories.com/Authors/amaranth.html

Franco

The standardized red coat uniform dates from the foundation of the New Model Army in 1645. Wikipedia says, "Red was chosen because uniforms were purchased competitively from the lowest bidder, and Venetian red was the least expensive dye." I recall reading many years ago that red uniform coats were common among Cromwell's forces during the Civil War and were adopted as the standard when the New Model Army was formed. Maybe both are true.

Not_a_ID
Updated:

I kind of figured that might be the case(cost of the color, but that could have gone either way), as that was back in the era of more natural dyes being used rather than the wonders of chemistry most have been using since the 19th century.

That also is why in more ancient times, certain colors tended to end up with certain associations. They were either really easy to produce, and quite common, or difficult to produce in which case use of them denoted wealth and power.

Such as the color choice for the Parthenon in Ancient Athens, which included a lot of reds, with indicators for greens, and blues as well as smaller amounts of other colors turning up.

Although of course, the most popular and best known form of such displays are in need of no explanation. As that was the use of gold and other (rare/precious) metals and materials in elaborate displays as well.

But there are reasons why you end up with wealthy and powerful figures dressing like peacocks when they're able too once you go back more than a couple centuries. It wasn't just about committing crimes against eyeballs. It was all about 1 upping the Joneses, with better quality fabrics, better tailoring, and more elaborate as well as expensive color schemes to go with them.

The advent of common artificial dyes thankfully turned that practice largely into a fashion crime, but it was what it was.

BlinkReader

@richardshagrin

Unfortunately did not have time. My job is eating more and more of my time :(

Have already bookmarked this author and hope to get some more time to read another of his stories...

Back to Top