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Lost teenage SciFi

Fia1

A couple of years ago I read this.

A bunch of teenagers get kidnapped by aliens, they get experimented on and turned into killing machines, they are away for years on missions, but a lot pass away, eventually they end up back on earth where there's a zombie apocalypse taking place and they help survivors...

That's what I remember, any help would be appreciated.

Cheers

Replies:   samuelmichaels
samuelmichaels
Updated:

@Fia1

Sounds like The Dogs of War by The Lurker. He took it off the Internet and posted on Amazon as Adrian Sparkman.

Replies:   BloodRedRoses  Fia1
BloodRedRoses

@samuelmichaels

dam would of been a good read

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@BloodRedRoses

dam would of been a good read

Just because it's on Amazon doesn't mean it's not still a great story. It just takes a little more incentive to find it, an investment often paid back in appreciation.

A free book is only a free book, but a $24 dollar book is one you thought worth the price, and you value it based on what else you could have done with the money. Was it better than other best-sellers or classics? If it costs nothing, it's often not valued as highly, despite how well written it is.

Fia1

@samuelmichaels

Damn that's probably it. Thanks anyway.

Cheers

sharkjcw

-If you are on kindle unlimited you can borrow it, or epub is $2.99 paperback is $8.00 new.

Replies:   Fia1
Fia1

@sharkjcw

Yeah, I bought it yesterday, just finished reading it. He should of turned it into a series. The ending left me wanting more.

Cheers
BigFia

Crumbly Writer

@Fia1

Yeah, I bought it yesterday, just finished reading it. He should of turned it into a series. The ending left me wanting more.

You never know. He might. Aside from my original "Catalyst", each of my current series have started as single stories. It was only months after I finished/posted them, that I saw a novel way of continuing the story. Often it's not enough to simply continue it, the new books need to convey something on their own, so the book will stand on it's own, otherwise it's merely 'more of the same'.

Case in point: My first Great Death book was about how people would react to an apocalyptic event (instead of treating the death of billions cavalierly). When I finished with it, I couldn't see writing 'yet another' post-apocalyptic book, as I had nothing to add. It was only months later it occurred to me: 'After having watched all their family and friends die, EVERYONE would respond different afterwards', which led to the second book. After that book, I asked, what would the protagonists bring to the table, once he was out of the picture.

In other cases, I often END my stories, either by killing the character ("Catalyst") or by making it impossible for them to return ("Stranded In a Foreign Land" and "Singularity"). But, with "Stranded", it occurred to me the bad guy aliens never seen in the first book could return, producing an entirely new book.

docholladay

@Fia1

Yeah, I bought it yesterday, just finished reading it. He should of turned it into a series. The ending left me wanting more.


You never know for sure. Even writers sometimes wind up with a series because of the reader's demands for more. I think it goes both ways however sometimes a planned series just refuses to take off and dies after the first volume. Actual sales for dead tree books have many possibilities and even publishers can be surprised.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@docholladay

I think it goes both ways however sometimes a planned series just refuses to take off and dies after the first volume.

I can vouch for that. My 3rd book in one series didn't do as well as the others (high scores, but lower downloads and fewer comments). As a result, I've held off continuing it, even though I fully intend to continue the storyline. On the other side, my more recent books haven't scored as well as my earlier stories, but they've either sold well or been well-reviewed by readers, so it's difficult measuring a book's worth by any single metric.

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