Home « Forum « Story Discussion and Feedback

Forum: Story Discussion and Feedback

Feedback

richardshagrin
Updated:

Feed back. Why would you want to be fed in your back? The only way to reach your alimentary canal from the rear is the anus, and taking in food as a suppository is going to be painful and probably require assistance. I strongly prefer Feed Mouth.

Also, unless you have a time machine, or are working with an editor, before the story is posted, being told something is wrong is difficult to correct, and people who read the story/posting before the correction is made know about the error anyway. It is almost all feed forward, you get comments after the story/chapter is posted.

Now if the feed back is praise, it doesn't require time adjustment to make any changes, but isn't it strange to ask for praise? I suppose saying you want feedback is more defensible than saying you want praise, but a lot of times that is really what they want. I think it might be better to ask for comments rather than feedback.

If you have listened to a microphone too close to a speaker, you have heard feedback. Its loud and hard to listen to, and might damage the speaker if it is made to vibrate too hard by the noise going through the microphone to speaker and back again and again until something breaks or someone turns off the system, either the mike or the speaker. I can't believe anyone wants that kind of feedback, unless someone wants to shut up a crowd, or make them move away.

End of Rant.

I recently sent this to a certain Corporal, who may want to remain nameless. I looked at it and decided I wanted to spread my (mis)information widely.

Replies:   Dominions Son  aerosick
Dominions Son

@richardshagrin

End of Rant.


That's not a rant, it's verbal diarrhea.

richardshagrin

@Dominions Son

Its not verbal. Its written. I admit there usually is at least one verb per sentence. If it is diarrhea at least it is coming out of the anus instead of coming in.

I guess your feedback on it is negative. Too bad, mostly my intention was humorous. Although that's a bone, aka funnybone.

Replies:   Dominions Son  solitude
Dominions Son

@richardshagrin

I broke my funnybone AKA humourous two years ago.

aerosick

@richardshagrin

I recently sent this to a certain Corporal, who may want to remain nameless. I looked at it and decided I wanted to spread my (mis)information widely.


Cpl Blackie got it and is trying to digest it with his fish heads & rice breakfast... :-)

El_Sol

You fed them... they feed you back.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@El_Sol

You fed them... they feed you back.

El Sol has it right. Feedback is input into how the story works, or doesn't, that's provided after the fact (i.e. after publication).

With Indie Publishing, authors can and do use the info. to make changes to their stories.

Essentially, the readers are feeding the authors information (that beta-readers normally provide before publication) after the fact.

solitude

@richardshagrin

Of course it's verbal, its expressed in words. I dislike the way people are using 'verbal' where 'oral' would be better/right.

richardshagrin

@solitude

verbal communication

Cruising the internet. Not everyone agrees verbal is written.

Definition

The sharing of information between individuals by using speech. Individuals working within a business need to effectively use verbal communication that employs readily understood spoken words, as well as ensuring that the enunciation, stress and tone of voice with which the words are expressed is appropriate.



Read more: http://www.businessdictionary.com/definition/verbal-communication.html#ixzz42iNMMWvp

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@richardshagrin

Cruising the internet. Not everyone agrees verbal is written.

The use of "verbal" in business communications is vastly different than either a standard dictionary or even a fictional approach to story telling. In business, "verbal" means confronting people one-on-one in order to stress the importance of an idea, rather than merely jotting of an email which tend to get overlooked and ignored.

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son

@Crumbly Writer

Not everyone agrees verbal is written.


Business has it's own jargon. You are better off looking elsewhere for common usage.

Here is the definition of verbal from thefreedictionary.com:

ver·bal (vûr′bəl)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or associated with words: a detailed verbal description.
2.
a. Concerned with words only rather than with content or ideas: a merely verbal distinction.
b. Consisting of words alone without action: a verbal confrontation.
3. Expressed in spoken rather than written words; oral: a verbal contract.
4. Corresponding word for word; literal: a verbal translation.
5. Grammar
a. Relating to, having the nature or function of, or derived from a verb.
b. Used to form verbs: a verbal suffix.
6. Of or relating to proficiency in the use and understanding of words: a verbal aptitude test.
n. Grammar
A verbal noun or adjective.

http://www.thefreedictionary.com/verbal

http://www.merriam-webster.com and http://www.oxforddictionaries.com agree, at least on the primary definition.

Ernest Bywater

@solitude

I dislike the way people are using 'verbal' where 'oral' would be better/right.


Two things here:

1. Oral can mean a lot more than the verbal delivery of words and is also the formal English version while verbal is less formal.

2. Verbal is also used as the name for a way of aggressively interrogating someone about something or aggressively confronting someone over an issue that's important to you. You often see some cops shows where they have the person in a room and keep at them with a barrage of questions - this is known as 'a verbal' within the law enforcement industry.

I write in the vernacular and would have a character give a verbal account of the events and not an oral account.

Replies:   solitude
solitude
Updated:

@Ernest Bywater

Verbal can mean spoken, but spoken or oral both rule out written. My objection is to misuses such as "a verbal contract is not worth the paper it is written on", and "we have a verbal agreement, but we need it in writing". In both cases, oral would be better - particularly so for the former.

Edit to add: I have no objection to using verbal instead of oral in cases such as EB's verbal account... unless the character then goes on to put in a written report, in which case I think it better to use oral for the original account.

Crumbly Writer

@solitude

My objection is to misuses such as "a verbal contract is not worth the paper it is written on"

I believe the meaning of this phrase is that a verbal contract is worth the paper it's written on, is zip, since there's no paper involved. You may see it as an ignorant oversight, but the meaning was (probably) intentional.

Replies:   solitude
Ernest Bywater

@solitude

My objection is to misuses such as "a verbal contract is not worth the paper it is written on", and "we have a verbal agreement, but we need it in writing"


In both these cases you're referring to common saying about something that was said, and thus an actual vernacular usage. Sayings are never correct formal English, and these two are perfect examples of vernacular English sayings. I'd nver write them that way in a formal English report, but would see the usage of verbal as correct in telling someone about them or in any other none formal document.

Thus we see the difference in style and usage between formal and vernacular usage of the language - and they're never going to meet.

richardshagrin

And then there is the distinct difference between verbal and oral sex.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@richardshagrin

And then there is the distinct difference between verbal and oral sex.

Verbal sex is what we do, talking about it (or talking dirty during sex). Oral is when you use your mouth, rather than your pen (negating the previous arguments).

solitude

@Crumbly Writer

Yes, I know they mean oral when people talk about verbal contracts and the worth of the paper... but those with a feel for language should avoid giving these implication that all written contracts are worthless. But then, I'm one of those who find their reading bought to a juddering halt by an author confusing discrete and discreet, or principal and principle, or disinterested and uninterested. I'm sure others can think up other examples, and think of some principal culprits, but on principle I think we should be discreet and drop this for now...

Replies:   richardshagrin
richardshagrin
Updated:

@solitude

My last law class was over 50 years ago, but there is a principle called Statute of Frauds which requires certain kinds of contracts to be written. I guess I should look it up on the internet. Contracts made by conversation are valid, as long as the Statute of Frauds doesn't require they be done in writing. I vaguely remember transfers of real property and that will take over a year to complete are supposed to be in writing. But you can sell your bicycle or an automobile, or a candy bar without a written contract. Going grocery shopping if you needed an attorney to complete each sale in writing would be challenging.

Replies:   sejintenej
sejintenej
Updated:

@richardshagrin


My last law class was over 50 years ago, but there is a principle called Statute of Frauds which requires certain kinds of contracts to be written. I guess I should look it up on the internet. Contracts made by conversation are valid, as long as the Statute of Frauds doesn't require they be done in writing. I vaguely remember transfers of real property and that will take over a year to complete are supposed to be in writing.


That's English law (my last formal classes were 1963 though I did the solicitors' refreshers in areas of interest up to 1999). From memory contracts of employment and their amendments now have to be written but can relate to groups (such as "all warehouse staff) and affixed in a prominent place in the workplace.

The Slim Rhino

@Dominions Son

That's not a rant, it's verbal diarrhea.


Also known as logorrhea...

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son

@The Slim Rhino


Also known as logorrhea...


I thought logorrhea was a math thing.

Replies:   richardshagrin
richardshagrin

@Dominions Son

logorrhea with rhythm. Logarithm.

Back to Top