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Is it better to post longer story at once or delayed?

BlinkReader

I have seen lot of stories here.

And I see that some authors are posting their longer finished stories at once, and other authors are posting them delayed (like once a week or twice a week).

What do you think is better for readers, and what for authors?

Replies:   Switch Blayde
Switch Blayde

@BlinkReader

What do you think is better for readers, and what for authors?


Reader -- post all at once (you don't have to wait if you like it)

Authors -- post a chapter at a time (you get more readers)

Replies:   cave jug
docholladay

As a reader, I don't think there can be a fixed rule for posting a story. The results will vary too widely for me to judge. You can use the method Ernest uses for posting his stories. He posts them in such a manner that one chapter is actually available at a time even though the complete story has been written and all chapters have been uploaded. The reader only sees the individual chapters as being new additions or updates. Or you can post a story as you write it which has its own problems.

Crumbly Writer
Updated:

Ernest automates his posts, so he can post once and forget it, while I prefer timing my releases, so I can maintain a steady stream, rather than dumping a story followed by a long wait for the next (my Professional editor and my changing my writing style screwed up that scheme, though).

In short, it's easier for authors to post once, but the longer a story posts, the more readers will discover it. I imagine, shorter stories are more likely to post quickly (using Ernest as an example, if he compresses multiple shorter chapters into 10,000 word chunks, there wouldn't be as much to post), while longer stories (more chapters, rather than word count), would be more likely to post slowly. But that's just a guess, rather than a fact-based observation.

We need to get more author feedback to reach any more detailed summaries.

docholladay

@Crumbly Writer

You are right CW. That is why I said there can not be a hard and fast rule for posting stories. There are so many factors involved. For a new author it might be best to do it in individual chapters. While for a better known writer the best method could be totally different. A new storyteller has to also build up a foundation of readers who enjoy their work. Something that keeps their name showing for days or weeks at a time, would have to improve the name recognition factor. But who knows there has to be so many variables that its impossible for a reader to know them.

Ernest Bywater
Updated:

@Crumbly Writer


I imagine, shorter stories are more likely to post quickly


I tend to write short stories of under 10,000 words, novels of 35,000 to 70,000 words, or sagas of 70,000 words and up. The short stories go up in one post, the novels and sagas I tend to post in 5,000 to 10,000 word chunks. That's because I hate it when I see an author has posted a new chapter and then it only takes me a couple of minutes to read and it's taken him a week to do that. That's one of the reasons why I rarely read on-going stories now, a couple of authors did that too often. I figure 5,000 words is the minimal nice read, and 10,000 words is a good read without keeping them up all night. I use the options in SoL to ensure it gets posted with a new part every other day, regardless of what I'm doing. Some of my stories take over a month to post, they're that long, and some are up in a week.

Another advantage my system has is when I start to post the story at SoL I make an e-book version available of the full story. That way anyone who can't be bothered to wait for it to appear at SoL can spend a few bucks at Lulu and get it all at once.

It all comes down to personal choices. I prefer not to post until after completion because it means I can makes changes to early parts if I want to alter the direction. It's a more convenient way to manage the overall story. I have the story appear a part every other day to keep it on the SoL home page longer and get it before more readers, I use the every other day cycle because it keeps the readers' interest and eventually has something being up on every day of the week during the posting cycle. I think this is important because some people check SoL on a specific day each week, and can miss things posted on other days.

typo edit

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@Ernest Bywater

I figure 5,000 words is the minimal nice read, and 10,000 words is a good read without keeping them up all night.

That's handy for the 'retired set' on SOL, but it doesn't work with working people (who are more interested in quick-reading published books). I've found my lengthy books seems to work against me, but I'm trying to find a happy medium between my shorter chapters and the longer ones my regular SOL readers prefer.

Replies:   Ernest Bywater
Ernest Bywater

@Crumbly Writer

That's handy for the 'retired set' on SOL,


The feedback I get from readers, both SoL and Lulu, is they like the longer stories to read while travelling or relaxing at night. I fellow says he loves a new story to download the day before he has to take a long flight for work.

zebra69347

I think posting a story over a period, is better than a one-time posting of a complete story.
A single posting can be missed by a reader. While spread across several days a reader can pick out a story in the Updated list on a subsequent posting and then find the start.

sejintenej
Updated:

Depends very much on the length; 5 screens all at once is fine but when you get 25 chapters of book 1 plus 100 chapters of book 2 plus 368 of book 3 (and the books are sequential) then a) I am sure Lazeez would have words if all 293 chapters were dumped on, him in one block and b) a reader would be overwhelmed and possibly give up.

Where you put the dividing line I simply don't know. In my case I have 10 stories that I look for each day in the new posts; that gives me +/- 15 chapters per week to read with the likelihood of up to 3 new chapters (sometimes 4) per day to read. That said I do want regular postings - not a year between chapters (as happened with one story I gave up on)

Crumbly Writer

@sejintenej

That said I do want regular postings - not a year between chapters (as happened with one story I gave up on)

Another reason for completing a story before posting. In that case, even if you're struck dumb with writers block, you can always continue editing, keeping the story unfolding at a regular basis as you wrestle with your creative writing dilemmas. Writing and editing take two separate mindsets. It's hard jumping from one to the other, but sometimes, by balancing them, you can avoid many of the typical writers roadblocks.

Even if real life intervenes, if you have some warning, you can prepare your chapters in advance and schedule them for automatic release over time, allowing you to undergo surgery (or divorce) as your story unfolds at a regular pace. Which is another reason why I emphasize posting in accordance to how long your next book takes to write. It's hard to schedule, but slowing delivery so there's not long delays makes it easier on the readers and prevents them from wandering away in the interim.

Ernest Bywater

@sejintenej

a) I am sure Lazeez would have words if all 293 chapters were dumped on, him in one block and b) a reader would be overwhelmed and possibly give up.


In regards to (a) it wouldn't worry Lazeez all that much because much of the system is automated.

As to (b) it's no different to finding a story after it's finished being posted (most of those on SoL are this way) or buying a book.

odave44

First let me say I greatly prefer long stories. I would probably never read any short ones if there were enough long ones to keep me busy. In answer to your question, as a reader, I don't mind getting it one or two chapters at a time, as long as the posting is long enough to have some completion to it. (One of my pet peeves is authors who use really short chapters that don't resolve anything.)
I think from what I've read most authors feel if you post a long one all at once it gets less notice than a serial posting. But perhaps the most important thing for me is to post it on schedule. There are a couple of my favorites writers here that will always post on the same day(s) of the week regularly. I really look forward to that.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@odave44

In answer to your question, as a reader, I don't mind getting it one or two chapters at a time, as long as the posting is long enough to have some completion to it.

I've always thought that SOL readers prefer longer stories specifically because they're posted a chapter at a time. Readers want to sit down and read. A single 6,000 to 10,000 word chapter is a decent read, but it's an awkward size in a book (i.e. it's longer than most readers want to sit before putting the book down and going to sleep).

In books, readers (seem to) prefer shorter chapters, so they have greater freedom to read multiple chapters, but have the option to quit on a more frequent basis, whereas SOL readers prefer committing to a single longer read.

The problem is that it promotes bloated fiction. That's what I discovered in my writing. No matter what I tried, I couldn't cut much from my books. Where others claim to cut 30+% from their text, even my professional editor (given free reign to cut as much as she wanted), couldn't cut that much--even though she eliminated my 'author's voice' in the process.

It was then I realized that I need to write more concise chapters. Each chapter stands on its own, and resolves the issues raised in each chapter, but they're only as long as they need to be, rather than artificially inflated to meet (SOL) reader expectations.

However, as good as that sounds, I'm still wrestling with how to present those chapters to the SOL readers. Despite the chapters being smaller, I'm still concerned with giving myself time to write subsequent books so I don't leave readers hanging between books.

odave44

@Crumbly Writer

I think the difference in chapter length for a hard copy book and here is that if I'm sleepy at home, I just mark the page and go to bed. That's a decision I can make. Can't do that if you sent a short chapter with no resolution here. So some level of completion in each chapter is nice. Kind of like the idiotic TV series Lost and a few others. Nothing was ever resolved. Very unrewarding to the reader (viewer).

docholladay

@sejintenej

Depends very much on the length; 5 screens all at once is fine but when you get 25 chapters of book 1 plus 100 chapters of book 2 plus 368 of book 3 (and the books are sequential) then a) I am sure Lazeez would have words if all 293 chapters were dumped on, him in one block and b) a reader would be overwhelmed and possibly give up.


I wonder how many readers and/or reviewers have noticed the fact that the timeline in his story is only about 6-9 months between the first chapter of book 1 and the current chapter of book 3. Its funny how many things have been included in that period of time.

Replies:   BlinkReader
docholladay

@Crumbly Writer

I've always thought that SOL readers prefer longer stories specifically because they're posted a chapter at a time. Readers want to sit down and read. A single 6,000 to 10,000 word chapter is a decent read, but it's an awkward size in a book


For me the length of the chapter is secondary. As long as the chapter actually adds something to the overall story and not just to try and keep the story on the updated list. Quality is always first.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
sejintenej

@Crumbly Writer

I've always thought that SOL readers prefer longer stories specifically because they're posted a chapter at a time. Readers want to sit down and read

That suits me. Noticed a story in the "new postings" list which intrigued me so exceptionally I opened it. 13 KB and its partner story was 19KB, each one chapter. There was in introductory part (competent), the bulk of the story and a sensible ending (those apply to both stories). Nothing to make me shy away - good spelling, good grammer (OK some of you might think otherwise), as logical as is reasonable in fiction, nothing impossible in today's world. However they were too short to satisfy me.
OTOH what about the looooooong ones. The Florida Friends stories have some action or threat of in almost every chapter but Arlene and Jeff? too many chapters with no "hooks" to pull me back next week

Thus I prefer longer stories but I accept that it is hard for authors to put hooks in each chapter to make me impatient for the next one.

Crumbly Writer

@docholladay

For me the length of the chapter is secondary. As long as the chapter actually adds something to the overall story and not just to try and keep the story on the updated list. Quality is always first.

Thanks, Doc. That's what I've been planning on. I'm keeping each chapter as concise (short) as possible, but ensuring each chapter deals with the issues at hand (while leaving the bigger issues unresolved until the end). However, it'll be interesting to see how it plays out. Unfortunately, I won't actually know for another several books, as I'm slowly whittling my chapter sizes over time.

BlinkReader

@docholladay

Many of us have seen this (onls 6 months for "ironing" us more than 10 years...).
Simply - what is too much, is too much.

Do you know why american soap operas (pardon me -TV Series) like Peyton Place, Dynasty, Dallas, Tween Peaks, etc... have lost appeal and people who are watching this crap have turned to latino soaps or in my my neighborhood - turkish soaps?

Reason is simple - american soap operas have no ending...
Everybody else has learned that everything must end ....

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@BlinkReader

Reason is simple - american soap operas have no ending...
Everybody else has learned that everything must end ....

On American TV, everything continues indefinitely, until they're cancelled, so often, there's absolutely NO resolution of any kind!

Replies:   BlinkReader
BlinkReader

@Crumbly Writer

Must agree with you.

Even voting for your president looks like never ending soap opera :(

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son

@BlinkReader

Even voting for your president looks like never ending soap opera :(


It's worse than that, US presidential politics makes the US soap operas look like a font of originality.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@Dominions Son

It's worse than that, US presidential politics makes the US soap operas look like a font of originality.

You're right. I'd never cast any of the current slate of candidates. They all lack believability!

Replies:   BlinkReader
BlinkReader

@Crumbly Writer

And I was foolishly thinking that only in my from god forgotten country politicians are so "loved" and "cherished" :D

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son

@BlinkReader

And I was foolishly thinking that only in my from god forgotten country politicians are so "loved" and "cherished"


Used car salesman would be the most reviled of all professions, if it wasn't for politicians.

Replies:   Wheezer  docholladay
Wheezer

@Dominions Son

Used car salesman would be the most reviled of all professions, if it wasn't for politicians.


I'd add in priests/preachers to that...

docholladay

@Dominions Son

Used car salesman would be the most reviled of all professions, if it wasn't for politicians.


You need to add these to your list:
Used Car Salesmen
Horse Traders
Lawyers
Police (regardless of actual titles)

And there are probably more than that need to be added.

Replies:   Wheezer
Wheezer

@docholladay

Lawyers? Naaaaah. Visiting a law office is a lot like visiting a whorehouse - You know you are going to get fucked and you are going to pay for it. No problem!

Replies:   richardshagrin
richardshagrin

@Wheezer

If you hire a lawyer, the theory is the other guy (you sue) is going to get fucked. Typically you don't know how much you are going to pay for the fucking. He pays his lawyer to fuck you. The longer it takes the more you both pay your lawyers. Why would they want to settle quickly?

Replies:   Ernest Bywater
Ernest Bywater

@richardshagrin

The longer it takes the more you both pay your lawyers. Why would they want to settle quickly?


Find one who'll agree to a Pro Bono payment for the case. You'll probably end up with a little less than if it was straight fees case finished that quickly but less cost than if it dragged on. Since they get a percentage of the payout, the quicker they can settle the case the less expenses they incur and the more profit they make.

Replies:   tppm
cave jug

@Switch Blayde

Sorry Switch. but,

Authors -- post a chapter at a time (you get more readers)


is incorrect. As a reader, I am sure I am not alone who waits for the last chapter BEFORE I read a single sentence. I'd like to know how you've made that conclusion.
Cheers.

Dominions Son

@cave jug

Sorry Switch. but,

Authors -- post a chapter at a time (you get more readers)



is incorrect. As a reader, I am sure I am not alone who waits for the last chapter BEFORE I read a single sentence. I'd like to know how you've made that conclusion.
Cheers.


It's quite simple, by posting over time, the story is on the front page longer, so more readers will have a chance to see it there.

Crumbly Writer

@cave jug

As a reader, I am sure I am not alone who waits for the last chapter BEFORE I read a single sentence. I'd like to know how you've made that conclusion.

A small group of readers do like you, waiting for stories to complete, but the majority prefer reading stories a chapter at a time. That way, they've got a constant source of reading material, and they don't have to worry about wasting too much time (I'm assuming).

The majority of my readers read while the story's unfolding. When it completes, an entirely new group starts. The strange thing, though not entirely, is that the scores after a story completes are typically worse than those who read the story before it completes, probably because those readers weren't attracted enough by the story to be interested, and simply aren't crazy about the plot.

Also, those readers (who wait for stories to finish) are more influenced by the final score, so it's important to draw readers during posting in order to influence and draw readers once the story finishes posting. In short, authors can affect the readership of stories while they're posting, but once the entire story is posted, they have little control over the story anymore.

Replies:   cave jug
Ernest Bywater
Updated:

@cave jug


I'd like to know how you've made that conclusion.


Posting over time, in most cases, puts it before more readers. Also, if it goes on long enough many readers will re-read early parts and up the download count, thus giving the impression of more readers.

One down-side is if you post on the same day each week on a weekly basis, you may not get that many extra readers because there are a number who check in only once or twice a week and if your story isn't on the home page and before them at that time they'll miss it. That's why I do the every other day because over the length of posting a novel (usual 7 to 10 posts) it appears on every day of the week at least once.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@Ernest Bywater

That's why I do the every other day because over the length of posting a novel (usual 7 to 10 posts) it appears on every day of the week at least once.

That makes sense, Ernest. In my case, I avoid posting on the weekend--too many stories post on Saturdays, so the story gets lost in the shuffle, and there's too little traffic on Sundays--and typically post the same days each week. Many readers prefer knowing when to turn in to read your story. If it skips days, they never know when to turn in. Posting on the same day is like a nice comfy chair, you know you can come, sit back and enjoy yourself, rather than arriving just to search for a seat.

Posting on either Thursday or Friday makes sense since most non-premier readers get a 3-day view of stories, so weekend readers can see a story posted on those days, while also garnering more attention during the week.

As you can tell, there are a lot of competing theories about when to post.

Replies:   Ernest Bywater
Ernest Bywater

@Crumbly Writer

Many readers prefer knowing when to turn in to read your story.


When I start posting a story I make a blog entry with the story size, how many posts, and the cycle it's posting on. Most of my regular readers know I do every other day, so they check every other day, and those who read the blog learn to check every other day. So, in a way, it's still a regular day it's posted on, just not a specific regular week day. I know what you mean about the weekend, especially Saturday in the USA.

Replies:   Ernest Bywater
Ernest Bywater

@Ernest Bywater

I forgot to add, sometimes I will disrupt my every other day cycle when a public holiday is coming up. If the cycle has a post the day before Christmas and the day after, I'll often alter the cycle to have the day before Christmas, Christmas, and two days later - thus giving the readers an extra read on Christmas day. I'll often do the same on other major holidays - whenever I remember the dang things on on.

tppm

@Ernest Bywater

Are you perhaps confusing Pro Bono (= free to the client) with Contingency (= lawyer gets a percentage of the settlement, if they win)?

Replies:   Ernest Bywater
Ernest Bywater

@tppm

Are you perhaps confusing Pro Bono (= free to the client) with Contingency (= lawyer gets a percentage of the settlement, if they win)?


My understanding from past interactions with lawyers here is Pro Bono means they get a percentage of the settlement, and contingency means they get their set fees as payment only if they win. In either case, whichever is the one they go by, it doesn't cost you anything up front and they work harder to get a win and done quicker.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@Ernest Bywater

Pro Bono means the legal services are donated. This is generally limited to court appointed lawyers, but not always (often, if lawyers want to take a case to the Supreme Court and the plaintiff has no money, they'll take on the case because of the potential benefit to their careers).

Pro Bono Publico
literally "for the public good"
Definition: Denoting work undertaken for the public good without charge, especially legal work for a client with a low income.

cave jug

@Crumbly Writer

Thank you guys for telling me your side of this issue. I, however, am annoyed at myself, for not conveying my point more clearly.

There are hundreds of you and I am one of the readers. So, how can I, with any clarity, read 100 stories while they are being posted?
It can not be done, don't you agree. I care not for scores, I've got to know many of you who write well and as such are on my list. I select stories on the bases of the codes I prefer and off I go.

Did any of you go to a bookshop and asked for a chapter or two from a Book your favorite writer is working on?

It is clear that I have a permanent disconnect with your way of thinking.

Crumbly Writer

@cave jug

There are hundreds of you and I am one of the readers. So, how can I, with any clarity, read 100 stories while they are being posted?
It can not be done, don't you agree. I care not for scores, I've got to know many of you who write well and as such are on my list. I select stories on the bases of the codes I prefer and off I go.

I don't disagree with you (that finished stories are easier to read), but what many of us were explaining is why there are exceptions to that rule (those searching for new authors, those with time to weed through the chaff, and those who prefer reading a chapter at a time (because it's not such an all-consuming obligation).

I've got no problem with your wanting to read finished stories, however, since most of our feedback is from readers who respond to ongoing stories, most authors respond to those who respond more frequently.

Dominions Son

@cave jug

There are hundreds of you and I am one of the readers. So, how can I, with any clarity, read 100 stories while they are being posted?


Do you follow more than one television series? How is that any less difficult than following more than one in-progress story. Do you try to record a TV series to only watch the entire series after the final episode has aired?

Replies:   cave jug
Crumbly Writer

Most SOL readers I communicate with typically read about 5 stories per day (that's an average, depending on length). If one story posts an especially long chapter (> 10K words) then maybe just the one.

But by jumping from one to another, only spaced by a few days, you can maintain multiple stories at once. If the postings grow longer than a single week, then you typically have to reread either the previous chapter, or in extreme circumstances, the entire damn series. That's when it becomes overwhelming.

Reading a chapter at a time is seen (by many) as a way of controlling how much time they invest reading each day. The flip side is, when a story finishes, you'll typically read the entire 50 chapter series in one streak, which requires a much more serious time investment (putting your life on hold until it's done).

Either way, whether you read multiple ongoing stories a chapter at a time, or a single finished story all at once, is up to the individual.

Replies:   richardshagrin
richardshagrin

@Crumbly Writer

There is at least one other option. There are stories where I read the first couple of postings when they are posted and decide this story would be better if I wait until it is done (if it is going to be finished). Some of those stories when they are done I read the whole story, maybe over a couple of days when its really long, and some of those I quit in the middle when what I read confirms the story isn't one I want to read. At least I didn't read it a chapter or two when they were posted. Sometimes I skip to the end and see if the ending is worth wading through all the intermediate chapters. Most of the time the quit and wait until the story is completed are suspension of disbelief issues. If all the plot and story are available, sometimes I can bury the hero is an heir to British Royalty but didn't know it issue in what else is going on. Sometimes I can't.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@richardshagrin

There are stories where I read the first couple of postings when they are posted and decide this story would be better if I wait until it is done (if it is going to be finished). Some of those stories when they are done I read the whole story, maybe over a couple of days when its really long, and some of those I quit in the middle when what I read confirms the story isn't one I want to read. At least I didn't read it a chapter or two when they were posted.

That's my point about the people who wait until a story is finished: generally, they'll rank your story much lower than those who read a chapter at a time, simply because they weren't that interested in the plot in the first place. But, you can decide whether the story is worth pursuing reading it a chapter at a time. If a story is bad, or suffers from substantial plot holes, it generally doesn't improve by the end. Also, many feel that 'reading the ending' to see if it's worth reading spoils the story, and then aren't interested in the details (this applies to mysteries in particular).

cave jug

@Dominions Son

I haven't watched TV last 2.5 years. It is a revelation if you try it.

Replies:   BlinkReader
BlinkReader

@cave jug

TV?
I'm already spending too much time watching lot of computer monitors almost 24 hours a day, so one more would be too much.
Also, TV is just one more tool of propaganda - and where I live, we have learned to HATE propaganda...

Replies:   cave jug
cave jug
Updated:

@BlinkReader

I am with you on that one, brother. I grew up in a Communist regime and migrated to A Capitalist country half way through my life. I can tell you that no regime on the planet can survive without a propaganda of one kind or another. Just the way it is. If we were too independent, we would be ungovernable, hence propaganda to keeps as tame and compliant.

Sooner one shrugs it off, sooner one becomes freer.

Replies:   BlinkReader
BlinkReader

@cave jug

cavejug_1


A toast to you from us left in one or other hell hole :)

(and don't be so sure that your place is much better :D )

Replies:   cave jug
richardshagrin

You should distinguish between proper goose and proper gander. Although sauce for one is sauce for the other.

cave jug

@BlinkReader

Oh. I never said my place (now) is better in respect of propaganda, quite the opposite, Propaganda is just one of the tools a State must employ as a part of governing exercise. Same or similar ideas repackaged to suit the times and political reality.

Since we are individualistic by nature, there has to be a mechanism to streamline the population for the benefits of the masses.

It is a philosophical question too, however, this is not a place to debate that aspect of human activity.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@cave jug

It is a philosophical question too, however, this is not a place to debate that aspect of human activity.

Sounds like the makings of a good story.

Replies:   BlinkReader
BlinkReader

@Crumbly Writer

Oooo, yesss!

Please,
I would very much like to read another good story!
Pretty please :)

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
zebra69347

On another web site there is a story with over 2800 chapters or should that be episodes. A chapter written most days.
The chapters are fairly short and some people have read from the beginning over a period of weeks.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@BlinkReader

Oooo, yesss!

Please,
I would very much like to read another good story!
Pretty please :)

I'm always eager to produce good stories, but you missed my point. I was suggesting that YOU write the story. No one else will ever feel for a story idea as strongly as you do. What's more, they won't have a feel for the story that you do. Because it strikes at your core, it's usually better to try writing it yourself, even if you've never written something yourself.

All of us started from scratch, and most of us posting on SOL didn't start with an education in creative writing or English composition. Instead, we just ended up stumbling into it.

Replies:   BlinkReader
Crumbly Writer

@zebra69347

On another web site there is a story with over 2800 chapters or should that be episodes. A chapter written most days.
The chapters are fairly short and some people have read from the beginning over a period of weeks.

You didn't mention how long each 'chapter' is, but I'd have to qualify those as episodes, and if they ever published, I'm sure they'd consolidate most of those into larger, better organized chapters.

Still, 2800 chapters would intimidate the hell out of me. I'd be wary of even cracking the cover on that one. If each episode is only 1,000 words, then the entire book is only 2,800,000 words, a phenomenal size! Essentially, that would translate into 46 full-sized novels!

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son

@Crumbly Writer

If each episode is only 1,000 words, then the entire book is only 2,800,000 words, a phenomenal size! Essentially, that would translate into 46 full-sized novels!


Personally, I would consider 60K words kind of small for a novel, a very light read. There are plenty of dead tree novels out there well over 100K words.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@Dominions Son

Personally, I would consider 60K words kind of small for a novel, a very light read. There are plenty of dead tree novels out there well over 100K words.

It varies widely based on genre. Mysteries are notoriously short, as were old-time romances. Sci-fi and historical dramas are typically much larger (80,000 to 100,000 for traditionally published books). All bets are off for Indie eBooks, where page counts don't affect cost, so the page counts have climbed--until Amazon Select, which (used to) benefit exceptionally short stories (2,000 to 10,000 words only).

Still, if we assume 100,000 words for each book, that one story would form 28 long sci-fi novels. Sounds like it could use a little editing. 'D

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son

@Crumbly Writer

Still, if we assume 100,000 words for each book, that one story would form 28 long sci-fi novels. Sounds like it could use a little editing. 'D


Ah, but it's only 6.5 Battlefield Earth's (428750 words http://www.answers.com/Q/How_many_words_in_battlefield_earth ).

I read Battlefield Earth in one sitting because at the time I was home sick due to a triple ear infection* and had nothing else to do but lay around moaning in pain.

*Yes, I meant triple. Right inner ear, left inner ear and left ear canal.

BlinkReader

@Crumbly Writer

I have written some stories - in my language.
(they were pretty bad, so I'm not going to write anymore, at least not now when I'm working 16-20 hours daily to help to feed and raise my kids)

And there is something else -language barrier.
English is my fifth (or even sixth) language. I do speak some, can work what I'm doing, I'm even translating some technical stuff from english to my native language and two others, but my mindset is strongly in my culture and my language...

Perv Otaku

"All of the above" is practiced by various authors.

Personally I prefer to have the entire story written, and then publish the chapters on some sort of set schedule (e.g. biweekly). I think this grants me more flexibility and is friendlier to readers.

Stories where each new chapter is more or less a stand-alone follow up to what's gone before are often conceived, written, and published on an individual basis. The updates are therefore often sporadic, but this approach also produces some very long series as long as the writer keeps coming up with ideas.

samanthak

The first thing I posted here is the longest thing I've written. I was warned when I submitted it as one part that readers preferred stories in smaller chunks. I'd say I have good evidence to the contrary, since a decade later, it's still my most-read piece.

Replies:   Ernest Bywater
Ernest Bywater

@samanthak

I'd say I have good evidence to the contrary, since a decade later, it's still my most-read piece.


I'd say that's more about it being what people like to read.

Once the story is fully posted people are going to read it at their own pace, anyway. The only thing that posting a story over time does is keep it's name and summary on the SoL Homepage longer because each new part posted will appear as a new posting - thus it gets the story before more readers during the time of posting. This is good to help establish a new author by getting more readers early up.

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