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I owe you some money!

cave jug

Hi there authors,
there are quite a few of you I send the agreed sum of money for a complete story I can read instead waiting for postings of chapters at your schedule. Well, you know who you are. What I have done this time, I promised to buy a coffee to a new author whose work has been rather new to me and very much enjoyable read and to who I did not pay before. This promised was made at the time of insufficient funds and very resent . Now , I can make good on it, but I have managed to loose the name. Very silly but true.
So, Sir, whoever you are, please respond.
Cheers.

Wheezer
Updated:

@cave jug

It must have been me......

If not.....

:^P

Ernest Bywater

@cave jug


So, Sir, whoever you are, please respond.


If it was me don't worry about it - I've not got access to any emails prior to 1 Aug 2015 at the moment, so I can't check.

Crumbly Writer

It weren't me, 'cause I'd have remembered!

richardshagrin

@cave jug

If you can't pay it back, pay it forward. Find some other author(s) you like and reward them, instead.

Replies:   cave jug
cave jug

Thank you all,
but the person I'm talking about has my email, since we have exchanged a couple. Just like EB, I have no emails available to me since they get scrubbed off, the server does not keep them after certain period.
The stories I have read I archive myself. Once I recognize it I'll find him prety quickly. I was just hoping he'll remember and drop me a line.
I'll wait few more days.
Thank you all.
Cheers

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
cave jug

@richardshagrin

Yes, good idea. When I like something, I make a comment to the author and once he responds to it, we take it from there. I'm annoyed with this, because I made myself a lier and all I've got is my word.

Ernest Bywater

@cave jug

I just thought of an easy way to check if it was me. Check you're hard drive and if you have any story by me in any format other than the SOL page downloads then you either had to buy the e-pub from Lulu or I sent it to you. If you have it as a .odt file I had to have sent it to you, if you have it as a single html file with a creation date less than 2 years ago I had to have sent it to you.

Crumbly Writer

@cave jug

The stories I have read I archive myself. Once I recognize it I'll find him prety quickly. I was just hoping he'll remember and drop me a line.

Do you even know if he reads the Forum? We're not the most popular reader segment of SOL. You may want to add an item to your Blog instead. But even then, if you're not posting a story he's reading at the moment, he'll be unlikely to notice it.

Without an email address, it's hard connecting with readers. :(

Replies:   richardshagrin
richardshagrin

@Crumbly Writer

Communication methods exist other than email, and I don't mean twits, twittering. Telephone operators might give you his/her phone number, particularly if you have a physical address. Of course if you have his street address, City and State you can send a snail mail letter. The post office is still delivering bills, although I haven't gotten a letter in a long time. Christmas cards still arrive in my mail box in December. Do you have any friends in common who might know where/how to find him. The traditional methods were telephone, telegraph and tell a woman. You might hire a private detective or bill collector.

Somewhere I heard the theory everyone is connected by at most six degrees of separation. If you ask all your friends, and ask them to ask all their friends, likely you can get in touch that way.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@richardshagrin

Telephone operators might give you his/her phone number, particularly if you have a physical address. Of course if you have his street address, City and State you can send a snail mail letter.

I believe the problem was that he didn't remember who the person was, not that he lost their email address. My point wasn't how hard finding an email was, but how hard it is to get a reader/author to respond if they're not actively engaged.

Replies:   cave jug
cave jug

@Crumbly Writer

Thank you all,
I found him, or rather, he sent me another email to address I've used to contact him in the first instance.
Cheers

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@cave jug

Yeah! We all love a happy ending. Now, to fit in with most SOL stories, you can provide him with a 'happy ending' rather than a cup of coffee. 'D

Replies:   cave jug
cave jug

@Crumbly Writer

Sorry SW.
you've lost me there with "happy ending". I sent the money and he'll buy a cup a tea. for all I know. That was a deal.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@cave jug

you've lost me there with "happy ending".

I was making a pitiful dirty joke, which fell flat[-footed]. Forget it. I'm glad you made good on your pledge. It says a lot about you that this minor detail would bug you so much.

cave jug

Thanks CW,
what else do we have but our word?

Crumbly Writer
Updated:

@cave jug


what else do we have but our word?


Tee-hee, some of us have our words. In that case, the quality of our work is what determines our worth.

Replies:   cave jug
cave jug

@Crumbly Writer

CW,
you need to start new genre, comedy, you've got a streak for it. We've got be able to laugh.
Cheers.

Arquillius

@cave jug

Probably not me as everyone hates my stuff. So yeah, if you don't then fine. My joy comes from those who actually enjoy my work... instead of trying to edit it like a bunch of Fools.

Replies:   richardshagrin
richardshagrin

@Arquillius

Bananas come in bunches. Fools come in gaggles. Emphasis on the Gag. Or maybe packs, like playing cards, but with more Jokers.

sejintenej

@cave jug

what else do we have but our word?

Old saying in finance: "Your word is your bond"; seems he cashed your bond in ;-)

cave jug

Oh, you made me laugh man,
so much bond and honesty from finance people in resent years! I wonder who have coined that phrase, it could not have been a banker!
Cheers.

Ernest Bywater

@cave jug

so much bond and honesty from finance people in resent years!


That's because for the last 30 years those entering the industry were MBA college graduates with a focus on marketing than accounting. The saying is very old and is from the days when bankers were bookkeepers not marketing rip-off people.

sejintenej

@cave jug

so much bond and honesty from finance people in resent years! I wonder who have coined that phrase, it could not have been a banker!

It was a banker! When I started if you for example got divorced you were effectively banned from the City of London because you had breached your wedding vows. Any run in with the law - the same. I actually benefitted from that; a rich City businessman misused company funds, was discovered and fled to Paris and from there to Havana where he died a pauper. Someone asked round for funds to bring his body back to England and every member of his family refused to donate anything because of his disgrace. He was not a relative or known to me but some of the funds were used to give me an education.
It was only when the American banks opened up that they claimed that such conventions were not law so they could be ignored. It got to the stage where the Bank of England knew certain bank directors were crooks but did not have sufficient evidence to definitely win a case in the courts so such people started running banks.

Crumbly Writer

Having been in the industry, one of the big recent financial trend was in the influx of other ethnicities/nationalities, who all came in with the attitude "Now we can steal grab our share."

In the old days, financing relied on the non-aggression of WASPS to ensure they wouldn't overreach. But with this new generation, who had mostly been ignored by the banking industry and thus saw it as corrupt to begin with, all bets were off. The entire [American] banking industry shifted at that point from 'watching over people's money' to 'grabbing whatever we can'.

Replies:   Ernest Bywater
Ernest Bywater

@Crumbly Writer

shifted at that point from 'watching over people's money' to 'grabbing whatever we can'.


That and multi-million dollar bonuses for improved bottom line for share holders. That entices the top managers to do all they can to screw clients to improve the bottom line.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@Ernest Bywater

That and multi-million dollar bonuses for improved bottom line for share holders. That entices the top managers to do all they can to screw clients to improve the bottom line.

I was working on Wall Street when they were inventing new securities. Since I could follow the math, and wrote the code to track the securities, I understood the securities being traded more than most of the traders buying and selling them. I was continually stunned by the fact the entire industry was being led by mathematicians playing games that no one in the industry understood. It was a system designed for monumental failure.

Ernest Bywater

@Crumbly Writer

It was a system designed for monumental failure.


Sounds like the deal with sub-prime mortgages - - that was a disaster waiting to happen from day one.

Crumbly Writer

@Ernest Bywater

Sounds like the deal with sub-prime mortgages - - that was a disaster waiting to happen from day one.

I also knew people involved with those. Oddly enough, he was the only mortgage banker I've ever known to be convicted and sent to jail, in no small part because he owned and ran a black-run mortgage company. I'm sure if he was white, he'd never have been charged in the first place. As it is, they threw the book at him on some extremely weak evidence. (No, he never sold mortgages to anyone who couldn't afford to pay it back. He also tried to retain control of which bank controlled which properties, but had little luck in that regard.)

sejintenej

@Crumbly Writer

I was working on Wall Street when they were inventing new securities. Since I could follow the math, and wrote the code to track the securities, I understood the securities being traded more than most of the traders buying and selling them.

I worked in the City of London and understand you perfectly. It was suggested that there might be as many as five people in the City who actually understood some of those products. I remember one deal - the documents were about 7 or 8 inches high; I spent an entire weekend at home working out the various permutations of how just one A4 page of legalese should be interpreted. Generally those things were a nightmare to try to interpret and there were normally multiple possible interpretations for me to reject and send back.

sejintenej
Updated:

@Ernest Bywater


Sounds like the deal with sub-prime mortgages - - that was a disaster waiting to happen from day one.

Caveat Emptor (buyer beware). Of course it was stupid but I suspect it was a case of "you scratch my back and I'll scratch yours". It was one of my jobs to assess all risks before they were taken and we were (unsuccessfully) pressured to take that sort of deal. The market hated anyone not being caught when someone sneezed; I got hell for taking cash security weeks before the biggest bank in an EU country went belly up and it got very political in the US.

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