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The Old Is New Again

red61544

I had no idea where I could post this in the Forum so I chose "Story Discussion" by default. I'm old. When I think back to my childhood, one of my fondest memories was of Saturday lunch. That was when my dad would give my brother and I each a quarter so we could go to our town's one movie theater for the Saturday matinee. That quarter would get us in the door, allow us to buy a box of popcorn, and leave us a penny to buy penny-candy on the way home. The matinee, which always included a couple of Looney-Tunes, would always end with a serial, a movie which would continue at next Saturday's matinee. The current episode would always end dramatically; in fact, those serials caused the term "cliff-hanger" to be coined. Often, the likes of Tom Mix or Lash LaRue would literally be hanging by his fingernails at the edge of a cliff and the guys with the black hats would be waiting to shoot him if he hoisted himself back to solid ground.

The other day, it occurred to me that I am now reliving those Saturday matinees by spending time reading stories on SOL. When I'm really getting excited about what's happening in a favorite story and I'm sitting on the edge of my seat glued to the computer screen, the chapter ends and I'm left starving for more, anxiously awaiting next Saturday when I can have one more episode. All that's missing is the quarter and the box of popcorn.

I just want to thank the authors who allow me to go back and relive that memory. Know that I appreciate the work you do even if I hate when the last chapter ends and I have to wait for the next to begin!

Replies:   red61544  PotomacBob  Joe Long
Crumbly Writer

You're welcome, though I'm not sure how I feel about my stories being compared to Looney-Tunes! 'D

Ernest Bywater

@Crumbly Writer

You're welcome, though I'm not sure how I feel about my stories being compared to Looney-Tunes! 'D


for some of the serial stories here calling it a Looney Tune would be a huge compliment.

Crumbly Writer
Updated:

Thanks for the memories. To show you aren't the only one to remember those days (even though I came by much later), here's an tribute I did to the old Tom Mix movies, back when I used to waste my time sketching instead of writing: Tom Mix #4.

Now you can see why I've never become rich from either art nor literature! 'D

samuelmichaels

@Crumbly Writer

'm not sure how I feel about my stories being compared to Looney-Tunes!


Considering how many millions of kids (and a few adults!) spend hundreds of hours being entertained by the Loony Tunes, I'd be honored to be compared to them!

richardshagrin
Updated:

There is a Canadian coin, one dollar in value, called a Loonie. I am not sure about the spelling, my spell checker thinks I have it wrong. Maybe it is a Loony? Music about Canadian money could be loony tunes.

There is a picture of a loon on the back of the coin.

There is a $2 coin, perhaps it is called the Tooney? Then for $3 you could have both, a loony tooney.

Replies:   StarFleet Carl
StarFleet Carl

@richardshagrin

Then for $3 you could have both, a loony tooney.


Maybe I'm showing my age, but I remember growing up the expression "Queer as a $3 bill."

Replies:   LonelyDad  sejintenej
LonelyDad

@StarFleet Carl


Maybe I'm showing my age, but I remember growing up the expression "Queer as a $3 bill."

I remember it too, but it is not politically correct to say such nasty things these days!

BTW, I learned the other day that the US used to have a $3 coin. Postage stamps at the time were 3¢, and the $3 coin was to facilitate purchasing larger quantities like 100 at a time.

Replies:   Ernest Bywater
Ernest Bywater

@LonelyDad

BTW, I learned the other day that the US used to have a $3 coin. Postage stamps at the time were 3¢, and the $3 coin was to facilitate purchasing larger quantities like 100 at a time.


Actually, from the research I did for some of my US western stories, I found out the $3 coin was around a hell of a long time before people were buying stamps in 100 stamp lots. I know some accounts credit the purpose was to buy 100 stamps but the coins were first authorised in 1853 and first minted in 1854. While the 3 cent silver coin had been authorised in 1851 to assist with buying stamps, when the price of a local delivery letter was dropped from 5 cents to 3 cents in 1851 because just about everyone except the government bought stamps one at a time, as needed.. There's no logical reason to authorise a coin for 100 stamps 2 years later, especially when the only places using stamps in those sorts of numbers are government organisations and the $1, $2.50 (Quarter Eagle), $5 (Half Eagle), and $0.50 (Half Dollar) coins were in common usage. The $3 was struck in an attempt to reduce the number of the larger value gold coins in circulation.

sejintenej

@StarFleet Carl

Maybe I'm showing my age, but I remember growing up the expression "Queer as a $3 bill."

We used (I haven't heard it said recently) to say "Queer as a four pound note".

Only relatively recently it was discovered that a four pound note actually was issued (I think in Cork when Ireland was part of the UK).

Illogically, if you are buying horses you have to pay in guineas. There has not been a guinea coin in my (extended) lifetime and I am not sure if there ever has been. A guinea used to be £1 1/- or in modern parlance 105 pence.

red61544

@red61544

I'm sitting on the edge of my seat glued to the computer screen, the chapter ends and I'm left starving for more, anxiously awaiting next Saturday when I can have one more episode.

What I said in the original post was never more true than with the newest chapter of "Bec4" (chapter 28). Of course, at least twenty out of those twenty-eight chapters have left me that way! I love it!

PotomacBob

@red61544

This young whippersnapper talks of inflated prices. My weekly quarter bought a ticket to the morning theater (9 cents) and the afternoon theater (9 cents), two Tootsie Rolls (1 cent each) and a Brock candy bar (one nickle, save the wrapper.) After three straight Saturdays, I could afford a Heath bar (ten cents) because with three saved Brock candy bar wrappers, the morning theater was free.

sejintenej

PotomacBob writes of his weekly quarter (I assume 25 cents).

When I started work I was on a specially increased salary because I could be sent anywhere at any time and without warning - the obvious places were the White Man's Grave (West Africa) and East Africa (from the Sudan to Rhodesia).
My annual salary was £425 (£8.17 per week)(equivalent to US$1020 (19.60 per week)). That had to cover accommodation (a long way from home), food, fares, posh work clothes and everything else. I couldn't afford even a Brock candy bar let alone the flicks.
Various things could get you the sack - marrying before the age of 25 without the employer's permission, not being properly dressed, using improper language .... One afternoon, standing behind the bank counter for eight hours (I was a cashier / teller) the manager noticed that I was not wearing regulation black shoes - because they wouldn't fit over the cast on my foot (I had broken a few bones the night before at martial arts classes). Definitely two sacking offences but I just got away with it; those were working conditions in those days.

Joe Long

@red61544

If only I could do a chapter a week!

richardshagrin

@Joe Long

If only I could do a chapter a week!

Just make them very short chapters.

Crumbly Writer

@Joe Long

If only I could do a chapter a week!


You could, if you'd kept your Brock candy wrappers like red61544 did! 'D

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