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Stories to get you in a good mood

demunics2

Any feel good stories out there? It would be a huge plus, if they have the quality where you could re-read them. :)

Only thing I don't go for is lesbian/gay stories, but for the rest it does not matter. Of course the less violence the better even though it is a bit self explanatory with the feel good "tag".

The last thing is of course it does not need to be an erotica story.

ustourist

@demunics2

Most stories have a 'down' as well as an 'up' so my definition may be way different to yours.
However, try:

The Millionaire next door by Lazlo Zalezac
Magic Carpet by Wes Boyd
101 Bell Whistle by Jim War
and
53 Miles West of Venus by Stultus.
That covers a wide enough range that you should find one cheers you up or makes you smile a bit.

samuelmichaels

@demunics2

Any feel good stories out there? It would be a huge plus, if they have the quality where you could re-read them. :)


oyster50 -- I would put most of his stories into the feel-good category.

REP
Updated:

Any of Lazlo Zalezac's' Donaldson series should work.

Lawyers in Love is short and humorous. It also gives the basics of the interrelationship of the families that make up the Donaldson clan.

I've reread all three of the stories multiple times, and of the three stories in the series, my favorite for humor is Cookie Magic.

Edited to add: P.S. My favorite of Zalezac's stories is Service Society, which has a very humorous take on a series of serious subjects.

richardshagrin

Perhaps Morgan's Six Month Turnaround fits the feel good category.

remarcsd

While just a short story, and with cheating as a subject, Not Guilty by Hardaysknight still makes me laugh every time I read it.
http://storiesonline.net/s/60833/not-guilty

Gauthier
Updated:

@demunics2

Most stories by Don Lockwood and especially: Finding a Place

Also stories by Girl Friday

LonelyDad

Just thought of this one. It is definitely a feel good, David vs Goliath type story. By Ernest Bywater.

http://storiesonline.net/s/68667/grammar

JohnBobMead

Most of Stormy Weather's stories are pretty upbeat.

Jim S

Feel good stories to me are those that have a strong sense of justice about them and redemption by one or more of the protagonist(s). One that comes quickly to mind is Boston to Birmingham by qhml1. In fact, several of his stories could probably qualify.

Replies:   samuelmichaels
samuelmichaels

@Jim S

Several of the shorter Lazlong stories would qualify. A much longer feel-long story is Best of Both Worlds by Dilettante -- it's a well done wish fulfillment.

jimh67
Updated:

Sales Team by Cat5

https://anonsol.net/s/45906/sales-team

Grant

Magestic by gwresearch.
Takes a while to get going, but a very good (and long) read. SF, action, adventure, humour & a happy ending.
http://storiesonline.net/s/63138/magestic

BlinkReader

Maybe we can add this -> "Bec - Lost in the Maze" universe - http://storiesonline.net/universe/380/bec-lost-in-the-maze

Replies:   Anomandaris
Anomandaris

@BlinkReader

BlinkReader
10/1/2016, 4:39:10 PM

Maybe we can add this -> "Bec - Lost in the Maze" universe - http://storiesonline.net/universe/380/bec-lost-in-the-maze


2nd that. The Bec series is a go to re-read when I'm really down. Very powerful writing.

Replies:   samuelmichaels  madnige
samuelmichaels

@Anomandaris

2nd that. The Bec series is a go to re-read when I'm really down. Very powerful writing.


I find it superb writing with a rather meandering plot.

pj

Well, THAT's fortuitous. In my opinion, as a reader who likes both mainstream smut and 'exceptional kid coming of age with little sex', I think the current hands-down winner is Zalezac's "The Future of Miss Powers".
Well.. actually I don't THINK it's the best current example, I KNOW it.

madnige

@Anomandaris

Also second the Bec stuff.

Very powerful writing.

Try this author's 'First Times' (review) for powerful: not nice, not feel-good, but very powerful (makes tears).

Crumbly Writer

I'm especially interested in this latest spate of requests for 'positive' books, as it seems to reflect an actual market trend, rather than a continual demand for more stoke stories. It seems to reveal a further maturing of the SOL tastes in stories (wanting quality stories that reflect their lives, rather than quick 'one off' fantasies that won't impact them.

Replies:   demunics2
jimh67

I absolutely love the first Bec book. I've read it through three time. Bec2 seemed to me to lose focus and got to where it wasn't feel good anymore for me. I never started Beck3. I'm apparently in the minority though since the scores for all three are sky high.

Replies:   BlinkReader
BlinkReader

@jimh67

Don't be afraid to read "Bec3" - it's worth reading (very much)

demunics2
Updated:

@Crumbly Writer

You are completely correct. It is nice to have stroke stories lying around, and they are fairly easy and quick to write as well. The thing about actual "good" stories, is that they are pretty hard to find depending on ones taste.

There is always only just a handful of quality writers when it comes to each genre. Not to mention it seems like these days quality authors seem to be disappearing. Either their health is failing or they stop writing for one reason or the other, and in a lot of cases remove their stories.

Edit: (http://storiesonline.net/s/10834:i) I read a story about a boy very recently here that had cancer. The way the author depicted and described every detail in that story, was nothing short of incredible. It will break you, lift you up and then utterly destroy you.

Those are the feelings I got from reading it. I recommend it to anyone who wants to experience quality work. You will be on a ride that makes you think you are actually part of his life. I can only imagine what it must be to actually experience watching someone dear to you, go through something similar in real life. Not to mention it would probably help you understand, someone with cancer a lot more.

Respect to anyone who has had to go through that hell, either as a participant or the victim.

Replies:   REP
REP

@demunics2

it seems like these days quality authors seem to be disappearing.


Most quality authors have had years of experiences on which to base their stories. Then there is the time and effort needed to learn how to translate an idea with its associated emotions and feeling into words. Developing writing skills takes years of practice.

By the time most authors have gained all of that, they are no longer young. But don't despair, there will always be new authors in the pipeline trying to gain the status of being a quality author.

Replies:   richardshagrin
richardshagrin

@REP

there will always be new authors in the pipeline


I hope you are right. I am 71, I am not that worried about where the new authors are coming from. Is there any firm evidence that there are dozens or hundreds of young men and women that want to write stories and post them here for our applause (sometimes) and no money? Maybe Lazeez knows. It probably is one of his nightmares that the supply of stories and the new readers who turn into premier readers that support the site dry up. Based on what I see in bookstores is that there aren't that many good new stories I want to read there, and except for Amazon, most brick and mortar stores are slowing going out of business. The last time I was in Barnes and Nobel most of the first floor was games and puzzles and cards and candy and almost anything but real books.

Replies:   REP  sejintenej
REP

@richardshagrin

I hope you are right.


I've said I'm 70 in other threads, but I will actually be turning 70 in about 5 weeks; close enough in my opinion. Somehow 69 seems so much younger than 70, so if you want to seem more (whatever) 70 is a better number. I think I'd rather be 30.

I don't have proof that I can hand you on a platter. However, as an old fart, I look at all those young whippersnappers enrolled in college. A lot of them are enrolled in courses that can lead to a writing career, professional or amateur.

I believe that there is a storyteller in all of us, and an author in nothing more than a person who has found a way to release his storyteller. Some of those young whippersnappers will learn how to let their storytellers loose.

Don't worry about the publishing industry, hardcopy or electronic. If they don't replace the old writers that pass on, they will have nothing to offer the public but reprints of existing stories.

Replies:   Grant
Grant
Updated:

@REP

If they don't replace the old writers that pass on, they will have nothing to offer the public but reprints of existing stories.


Sounds like Hollywood.

Cheaper to remake something that was successful 20+ years ago than to gamble & pay someone to come up with something new.

I'm surprised that there's never been a remake of "The Million Pound Note", although I don't see how you could improve on the original. Not that that has stopped Hollywood from doing remakes in the past.

Replies:   Capt Zapp
Capt Zapp

@Grant

Cheaper to remake something that was successful 20+ years ago...


Unfortunately they tend to really screw up good movies in the process.

Replies:   richardshagrin
richardshagrin

@Capt Zapp

And screw up really good novels. Example: Starship Troopers by Robert Anson Heinlein.

Replies:   REP
REP

@richardshagrin

Definitely. I read the book, and looked forward to the movie. Saw the movie. The book was about the conflict with be bugs, and the movie was about the troopers' personal relationships. Preferred the book. If I had not read the book, I would have rated the movie higher than Fair.

BlinkReader

And screw up really good novels


Another example of good books made awful film (or movie for you from good side of the pond) is Postman.

I still can't understand how they managed to criple and destroy such a good novel :(

sejintenej
Updated:

@richardshagrin


Maybe Lazeez knows. It probably is one of his nightmares that the supply of stories and the new readers who turn into premier readers that support the site dry up. Based on what I see in bookstores is that there aren't that many good new stories I want to read there, and except for Amazon, most brick and mortar stores are slowing going out of business. The last time I was in Barnes and Nobel most of the first floor was games and puzzles and cards and candy and almost anything but real books.


This side of the pond far fewer dead tree stories are being printed; I would suggest that a) electronic versions are cheaper for the buyer/reader b) electronic readers are easier to carry than a mountain of novels and c) other uses of electronics are more attractive to the younger set and d) publishers are far more aware of the bottom line and less prepared to try new authors.

REP wrote

I don't have proof that I can hand you on a platter. However, as an old fart, I look at all those young whippersnappers enrolled in college. A lot of them are enrolled in courses that can lead to a writing career, professional or amateur.

I believe that there is a storyteller in all of us, and an author in nothing more than a person who has found a way to release his storyteller. Some of those young whippersnappers will learn how to let their storytellers loose.

Old fart indeed - just a bit beyond a baby ;-)
Many courses in writing, journalism etc. lead to unemployment and the graduate has to find something which brings in the groats. Book writing has a reputation of not being a profitable occupation so time is used elsewhere.
Tastes change - would Faith Stone or her husband Compton MacKenzie be published today? I have a number of her books (for a personal reason) but I don't think they are marketable now.

It is often in the older people, often retired, that they have the time, the financial security and most important the experience of the decades to write. Yes, there are younger writers - some Mills and Boon authors do well because they write to a proven script. Very occasionally there will be a meteor, a new writer like James Clavell who sets the world alight, gets rich, but they are few and far between.

I was going to use Arthur C Clarke as an example but for him writing was only part of his work

Replies:   Capt Zapp  REP
Capt Zapp

@sejintenej

I think future archaeologists will be digging through or remains and think we suddenly stopped creating anything but weird plastic disks. It seems that with everything going digital, there will be no lasting records of our accomplishments. The coatings of CD's and DVD's will deteriorate and make the data unrecoverable. Magnetic recording media, IMO, was the beginning of the end of long-lasting media.

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son

@Capt Zapp

Magnetic recording media, IMO, was the beginning of the end of long-lasting media.


The end began much longer ago that than. Stone/clay tablets are good for 10s of thousands of years.

Parchment/vellum (animal hides) is good for 1 or 2 thousand years if properly stored.

Wood pulp based paper is only good for a century or two unless very carefully prepared and stored.

CDs/DVDs will last nearly as long as paper if stored properly.

The upside of digital data is that it can much more easily be copied accurately to new storage media as technology improves.

Replies:   Capt Zapp
REP

@sejintenej

All true.

However, from a different POV, only a few people of our generation were successful writers. I expect that will also be true of the younger and upcoming generations.

Replies:   sejintenej
Capt Zapp

@Dominions Son

The upside of digital data is that it can much more easily be copied accurately to new storage media as technology improves.


The downside is you have to have some way to access it. The last storage medium that did not require powered technology to access was film and records (vinyl). Try playing a CD or looking at photos stored digitally without a player.

Replies:   Dominions Son
sejintenej
Updated:

@REP


However, from a different POV, only a few people of our generation were successful writers. I expect that will also be true of the younger and upcoming generations.


Although I have no doubt that within each future generation there will be those with the ability to write well I suggest that the circumstances are and will be different.

With electronic media readers will read the story and then it will be gone as the reader looks for something new. Many find reading from a screen at least tiring and will read less for pleasure. Income from 99 cent electronic books will not be enough to answer satisfactorily "What are you worth?"; writing will become a second string to more conventional employment - just look at the blogs here - too much work, poor health are seen.

As Dominions Son points out, magnetic media has a finite life (the oldest document I have personally handled was on a skin written in the early 1500's) but already stories from SOL are disappearing and it will become easier for the authorities to delete stuff they don't approve of - you can't email banned stuff and it is harder to hide electronic media and then read it than dead trees!

The world today is very different to that in 1944 and it will be different tomorrow. What will the new US president ban? Non-fiction perhaps?

Replies:   REP  Dominions Son
REP

@sejintenej

I do not dispute what you say and agree with a lot of it.

However, my original post was targeted at richardshagrin's concern that there would be no future writers to replace current writers who can no longer write.

Dominions Son

@Capt Zapp

The downside is you have to have some way to access it. The last storage medium that did not require powered technology to access was film and records (vinyl). Try playing a CD or looking at photos stored digitally without a player.


Absent an apocalypse that isn't likely to ever be an issue in the future.

Replies:   Capt Zapp
LonelyDad
Updated:

NASA has already had to mount a search for outdated technology to preserve tapes made in the early years of the Space Age, since the devices able to read them aren't being made anymore. Anyone you know have access to a nine track tape drive, let alone a seven track one? There are still a few 8" floppy disk readers around, but not that many outside of SAC Missile Command. We are constantly outpacing our past storage technology without giving any consideration to saving the data stored on it.

Dominions Son

@sejintenej

but already stories from SOL are disappearing


Mostly they are being removed at the request of the author. I've been a reader here for more than a decade, stories being removed from the site are nothing new.

Capt Zapp

@Dominions Son

Absent an apocalypse that isn't likely to ever be an issue in the future.


Just because we don't see it coming doesn't mean it can't or won't happen.

At the rate the world is going to shit, it wouldn't surprise me if it does happen. And that is just what humans can do to ourselves. Solar flares and other stellar activities have disrupted electronics even though only for short periods.

Replies:   Dominions Son  REP
Dominions Son

@Capt Zapp

At the rate the world is going to shit, it wouldn't surprise me if it does happen.


Perhaps, but given a global civilization destroying catastrophe, paper won't last all that long either.

REP

@Capt Zapp

At the rate the world is going to shit, it wouldn't surprise me if it does happen.


One of the reasons the world is going to shit, is the citizens of many countries are tired and frustrated by situations that seem to be out of their control.

They are tired of and overwhelmed by immigrants, legal and illegal. They are tired of fighting wars with one hand tied behind their backs. They are tired of politicians that say one thing and do another.

There are so many things in this world that people are tired of that they feel overwhelmed by situations that seem hopeless.

Grant

@demunics2

Any feel good stories out there?

2 more stories that come to mind are Australian Story and Lost, both by Oz Ozzie.
http://storiesonline.net/a/Oz_Ozzie

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