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From Runaway Train

samis

"I can tell by the smile on your face," Jill replied. "Got any brothers at home, Travis? I'd like to have that look on my face once in a while."

"Only child," Liz replied. "You are shit out of luck."

Wondered why Jay didn't just use "SOL" at the end?

Replies:   Capt Zapp
Capt Zapp

@samis

Wondered why Jay didn't just use "SOL" at the end?


Probably because he is used to saying 'shit out of luck', not SOL. Had Liz been in mixed company age-wise, he very well might have used SOL instead.

I do know a few people who actually say 'OMG' and 'LOL' in conversation. They sound ridiculous.

Replies:   Grant
Grant

@Capt Zapp

I do know a few people who actually say 'OMG' and 'LOL' in conversation.

Seriously???
How old are they?

Ernest Bywater

@Grant

How old are they?


whatever the age, the figure is probably higher than their IQ.

samis

Oh come on. SOL was a take off of Stories on Line. (SOL) How often have you all seen it and not notice?

LOL and ROTFL.

Replies:   awnlee jawking
awnlee jawking

@samis

LOL


When I was young, LOL stood for 'lots of love'.

AJ

Replies:   Crumbly Writer  Grant
Crumbly Writer

@awnlee jawking

When I was young, LOL stood for 'lots of love'.

My issue with LOL and ROTFL, is I've never seen anyone do either when they send those comments, and I can't imagine them doing it either. It's a meaningless social construct that instead means "You're not supposed to take this insult seriously". It's an official disclaimer for internet posts so you can claim innocence if someone calls you out on something. As a result, I see it an insincere and ignore it whenever I see it. (i.e. it's used the same way I use smiley faces to show when I'm teasing.)

Replies:   Grant
Grant
Updated:

@Crumbly Writer

It's a meaningless social construct that instead means "You're not supposed to take this insult seriously".


I've never seen it used that way myself.

All the usage i've seen of them has been in message boards & chats as a response to a post, letting the poster how funny they found that particular post.

You don't put it at the end of something you say, it's a response to something someone else has said.

Replies:   awnlee jawking
Grant

@awnlee jawking

When I was young, LOL stood for 'lots of love'.

When I was young LOL didn't exist.

Crumbly Writer

@Grant

When I was young LOL didn't exist.

It ("Lots of Love") was something young mothers would write in kid's school lunches during a certain period (60s, 70s, 80s?). I'm sure it was strictly a regional thing, though I don't know how it ever got started.

Replies:   Capt Zapp
Capt Zapp

@Grant

Seriously???
How old are they?


Quite serious. They were over 25 at the time. I haven't personally seen them in several years but from what I understand, they still talk that way.

Capt Zapp

@Crumbly Writer

I don't recall ever seeing LOL (Lots of Love) in notes, but there were always plenty of XXX's and OOO's, usually as 'xoxoxo'

Replies:   Grant  Crumbly Writer
Grant

@Capt Zapp

I don't recall ever seeing LOL (Lots of Love) in notes, but there were always plenty of XXX's and OOO's, usually as 'xoxoxo'

Yep.
X= Kiss.
O= Hug.

Crumbly Writer

@Capt Zapp

I don't recall ever seeing LOL (Lots of Love) in notes, but there were always plenty of XXX's and OOO's, usually as 'xoxoxo'

The one, "Lots of Love", seemed to grow from the other "xoxoxo", probably because the mom's finally got sick of alternating so many xs and os! Kids accounted for that, as they viewed your love based on how many xs and os your write each day.

awnlee_jawking

@Grant

When I was young LOL didn't exist.


What about SWALK?

AJ

Replies:   solitude  Capt Zapp
awnlee jawking

@Grant

I've seen and used it both ways, with the caveat that I didn't really use it to accompany an insult but something that was open to ambiguous interpretation.

AJ

solitude

@awnlee_jawking

What about SWALK?


Or NORWICH?

Replies:   ustourist
ustourist

@solitude

The one that stuck in my mind most - and I used it - was 381, though I have only known of it in military circles.

Capt Zapp

@awnlee_jawking

What about SWALK?


Not SWALK, but SWAK (Sealed With A Kiss) in my case (there was a killer on NCIS that used that - sent a SWAK envelope to NCIS and Dinozzo opened it and got covered in some kind of Bio-agent.)

Replies:   awnlee jawking
awnlee jawking

@Capt Zapp

Convention hereaways was to include L for Loving. Wouldn't want a Glasgow kiss :)

AJ

Replies:   Capt Zapp
Capt Zapp

@awnlee jawking

Wouldn't want a Glasgow kiss


Definitely not!

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