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Question for Bloggers

demonmaster62

I know some of you do this. I've been doing research on starting one of my own. One of the biggest things that all of the so called "experts" say right off the bat is not to use one of the "Free" platforms, as you don't own your own writing if you go this route. Which is important if you hope to make revenue from it down the road (which I do).

Unfortunately, the only thing in my budget right now IS "Free".

Any suggestions, or words of advice?

Anything is welcome.

You can even laugh if you want. Though I am serious about doing this.

Demon

Dominions Son

@demonmaster62

Platform for what?

Replies:   red61544
Switch Blayde

@demonmaster62

is not to use one of the "Free" platforms, as you don't own your own writing if you go this route.


Where did you hear that? These types of sites typically say they are not responsible for the content so they can't be held liable for something illegal. So if they don't own the content, how would they own your stories?

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@demonmaster62

I've maintained my own website for some time (two of them, in fact, one to sell my books (www.vincentberg.com) and one to post my free stories (www.crumblywriter.net, which features NO SEO keywords as I don't want it to be found by my paying customers!). I've also advised a few newbies on creating their own site.

If you go with free, especially for writing any form of porn, is that with a single complaint, WP (WordPress) or the other services can shut you down cold--and there is NO medium to argue your case.

You can find several low-cost sites (first year only a few bucks, more for every year after that). I use hostica.com, but I'm sure there are more options by now. The advantage here, is that the pay sites offer a huge variety of tools, include the full professional WP package (meaning you can use WP (or similar sites) with additional features without their creative control.

For the first year, you won't pay much for the website, but you will pay for your website name, which you'll want to maintain. If you forget to pay, someone else is liable to grab it from under you and post things (mostly ads) as you, creating bad PR, and making your fans distrust you.

I'd also be cautious about using the term "Blog". A blog suggests that you're mostly using it to mouth off (i.e. talk about what an expert you are on a variety of topics). A website suggests a professional site which features services (i.e. a story site as opposed to someone telling everyone else how to write stories.

This is a typical trap many aspiring authors find themselves in. They'll start a blog, and in order to feed the ravenous appetite for free content by fans, they end up writing blog entries full time, never managing to advance as a fiction writer. That's why there are SO many 'writing blogs' telling you what NOT to do, rather than suggesting how to succeed.

If your problem with the pay sites is a lack of credit (i.e. no credit card), I'd suggest using paypal. You can either tie it directly to your bank account, or by depositing funds to the site. What's more, instead of having hundreds of different sites storing your credit card info insecurely, you only have a single site, which is invested in protecting your credit info.!

Hope that helps. If you have any further questions, feel free to contact me directly (not sure there's a way to do that on the SOL forum, under the old Google Groups you could always elect ("Respond via email")).

Crumbly Writer

@Switch Blayde

Where did you hear that? These types of sites typically say they are not responsible for the content so they can't be held liable for something illegal. So if they don't own the content, how would they own your stories?

Switch, they don't "own" the stories, but they "own" the site (instead of you). Meaning that, if someone sees something on the site they object to, you'll find yourself without a website, and all your content will disappear overnight, often taking you weeks to months to recreate and rebuild it.

From what I've seen, going the "Free" route is a recipe for disaster, especially if your content might offend ANYONE in the slightest. (People are quick to complain about anything that offends them nowadays!)

Ernest Bywater
Updated:

@demonmaster62


Which is important if you hope to make revenue from it down the road (which I do).


Personally, I think 99.999999999% of bloggers are a waste of good electrons. I've not seen them all so I can't make it 100%. Nor can I see anyway to make reasonable revenue from a blog.

However, if you're talking about website and not blog, then you'll have to pay money for some sort of e-commerce package to manage what you sell, even if it's just subscriptions.

edit to correct word choice error by me

demonmaster62

My fault, I wasn't clear in what I wanted to say. I want to start a BLOG. You know, for writing about politics/current events/music/etc..etc.

I wasn't looking to post my porn stories on it.

As far as what I said about them owning your writing, I mean that they CAN (as has been pointed out) shut you down, basically on a whim. If and it's a big IF, any advertisers want to be on your page(which is where the money is), the owners of the "free" platform recieve the revenue, not the hard working blogger.

As far as my porn goes, I still hope to publish it through Amazon or Smashwords one day. Until then, I still have SOL to post that stuff on.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@demonmaster62

As far as my porn goes, I still hope to publish it through Amazon or Smashwords one day. Until then, I still have SOL to post that stuff on.

In that case, you'll eventually be looking at maintaining multiple websites. As such, it makes sense to get started on the right track now, so you'll know what you're doing when you eventually launch your pay (story) site.

You don't always have to pay a lot, but your site is more secure if you pay for it than if you depend on the largess of a corporation unconcerned with your welfare.

red61544

@Dominions Son

Platform for diving! Eventually, everyone who blogs screws up, says the wrong thing, and dives off the 10 meter platform into an empty pool! I know five different people who have said something in a blog that they've regretted. If you don't blog, that's one less way to f@c$ up (Refer back to the topic on Swear Words!)

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son

@red61544

I know five different people who have said something in a blog that they've regretted.


Is not evidence that everyone screws it up.

There are a number of very good blogs I follow on a regular basis.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-watch/
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/volokh-conspiracy/
Note: those first two are hosted on the Washington Post web site, but they are independent blogs over which the Washington Post has no editorial control.

http://wmbriggs.com/
http://www.coyoteblog.com/
http://overlawyered.com/
http://wattsupwiththat.com/

Replies:   red61544  Crumbly Writer
red61544

@Dominions Son

Wait for it! I said "eventually". I read blogs, too. But, if you wait long enough, all bloggers apologize!

Crumbly Writer

@Dominions Son

Note: those first two are hosted on the Washington Post web site, but they are independent blogs over which the Washington Post has no editorial control.

Maybe not, but I'm guessing they hire editors to double and triple check each blog entry, which helps ensure they don't say the wrong thing in the heat of the moment--something an independent author/blogger won't be likely to afford.

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son

@Crumbly Writer

Maybe not, but I'm guessing they hire editors to double and triple check each blog entry, which helps ensure they don't say the wrong thing in the heat of the moment--something an independent author/blogger won't be likely to afford.


No they don't. The authors at the VC are mostly law professors. And they have no connection to WaPo other than WaPo hosting their blog.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@Dominions Son

No they don't. The authors at the VC are mostly law professors. And they have no connection to WaPo other than WaPo hosting their blog.

Read my language. I never claimed they used WaPo employees, only that they had their own in-staff experts who could step in before they published something stupid--which most indie bloggers don't. Hell, the fact the site is composed of lawyers means they have plenty of people aware of potential pitfalls, both legally and perceptually.

Just because someone doesn't receive funding from a newspaper doesn't mean they don't think like a newspaper.

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son

@Crumbly Writer

Read my language. I never claimed they used WaPo employees, only that they had their own in-staff experts who could step in before they published something stupid--which most indie bloggers don't.


Again, no, they do not employ professional editors. And they aren't practicing lawyers, they are law professors. Writing for VC is something they do on their own time, they do not get paid for it by anyone. At best they might have a couple of grad students to do editing for them.

Replies:   REP
REP

@Dominions Son

Again, no, they do not employ professional editors. And they aren't practicing lawyers, they are law professors.


Off topic a bit, but I am curious if a law professor has to be a licensed lawyer. If so does the professor require any practical experience as a practicing lawyer.

Dominions Son

@REP

I am curious if a law professor has to be a licensed lawyer. If so does the professor require any practical experience as a practicing lawyer.


My understanding is that no, they don't and in fact most law professors go into academia straight out of law school and have never actually been a practicing lawyer.

https://popehat.com/2009/03/11/maybe-charlie-nesson-can-throw-chalk-at-judge-gertner/

https://popehat.com/2009/08/03/those-who-teach-cant/

Crumbly Writer

@REP

Off topic a bit, but I am curious if a law professor has to be a licensed lawyer. If so does the professor require any practical experience as a practicing lawyer.

The only requirements for academia are: a PhD in a particular subject, and publishings in the field increase your salary/prestige. Although, it's not unknown for ex-DAs (especially those who've lost elected positions) to cross into teaching (the students gravitate to professors who actually fought significant cases in court).

Replies:   richardshagrin
richardshagrin

@Crumbly Writer

The legal doctorate is an LLD, Doctor of Laws, and increasingly Law Schools award them as opposed to some kind of masters degree. I am not certain what kind of PhD would work for someone to teach law. Perhaps dual majors could have an LLD and a PhD. I suspect some Judges retire to law school to teach. District Attorneys usually go into private practice or join a partnership as a senior partner to take advantage of their connections. After public service, they need to practice law for a while to get rich, then they can serve as a judge. Student loans and children's college expenses need to be paid. And fees to join and remain members of Country Clubs where they can meet future clients and other expenses of being visible in society again to meet potential clients. One reason lawyers charge so much is that their expenses to be a top flight lawyer are so high. They almost have to appear rich to get wealthy clients. Ambulance Chasing is not usually a good way to make lots of money, or at least to get it and maintain prestige.

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son

@richardshagrin

The legal doctorate is an LLD, Doctor of Laws


This is incorrect. I have a cousin who is a lawyer, it's a JD Juris Doctor

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