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Seeding the neighborhood library

Bondi Beach

Around where we there are "Little Libraries," wooden boxes of varying construction set on posts, glass-enclosed, where folks donate books and borrow them. I had an extra printed copy of Promise and couldn't resist donating it. Gone the next day, according to my spouse.

Of course, it's effectively paying your readers to read your stuff instead of the other way 'round, but that's a minor detail.

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Replies:   Ernest Bywater
Ernest Bywater

@Bondi Beach

Around where we there are "Little Libraries," wooden boxes of varying construction set on posts, glass-enclosed, where folks donate books and borrow them.


It's a good way to share books you no longer want to keep. However, some local governments are fining people for putting them up, and some people are stealing the books to sell to 2nd hand book shops - even if all they get is a few cents they're ahead.

Crumbly Writer

@Ernest Bywater

It's a good way to share books you no longer want to keep. However, some local governments are fining people for putting them up, and some people are stealing the books to sell to 2nd hand book shops - even if all they get is a few cents they're ahead.

It makes more sense than donating your books to your local library. After doing so (so those who know me can access my books), the book disappeared for over 4 months. Finally I asked, they searched and it was in the library in the State Capital, over 5 hours away. NO ONE knows me in the state capital, so the book doesn't do anyone any good there.

I'll never donate a book the library again. If they want one, they can pay for it like everyone else (I make them available for libraries cheap, although only one book was ever selected by any library).

For a long time, I offered my books in our churches annual 'Goods & Services' auction, and it was always well-bid for (often starting bidding at $20, when the retail price is only $9.99). Unfortunately, the latest auction committee decided they're no longer carrying any other items other than 'gifts' (i.e. nothing but candies, cakes or baskets of things for Valentines day).

Replies:   Ernest Bywater
Ernest Bywater

@Crumbly Writer

It makes more sense than donating your books to your local library. After doing so (so those who know me can access my books), the book disappeared for over 4 months. Finally I asked, they searched and it was in the library in the State Capital, over 5 hours away. NO ONE knows me in the state capital, so the book doesn't do anyone any good there.


Why did they ship it to the state library? Did they say?

Here the libraries are independent of each other and linked to their local council who funds them (think county authority), except where they're a Regional Library Service with multiple facilities. When I was living in Sydney I would often got to two libraries - Enfield and Burwood, and the only time anything went from one to the other was if an inter-library loan was used. Sure, when each library got over full they either moved some books into storage or placed books that rarely got used and weren't reference books out for sale.

Where I am now the councils are so small they couldn't afford a decent library, so years ago they joined forces and created a jointly operated regional library service that operates a mobile library for the small communities and a couple of large library buildings in the bigger towns and cities. Books move between their facilities, but they all stay within the organisation. If I want the state or national library to have a copy of a book I have to send it to them directly.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Bondi Beach

@Ernest Bywater

some people are stealing the books to sell to 2nd hand book shops - even if all they get is a few cents they're ahead.


At our local recycling center there is a book exchange. The intake is a gigantic box where you toss your donation in. There are almost always 4-6 vultures hanging around to harvest what they think they can resell.

Joe "Bondi" Beach has contributed to that pile as well with proof copies and their corrections.

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Crumbly Writer

@Ernest Bywater

Why did they ship it to the state library? Did they say?

I specifically told them: "This is a gift to this library so that my local friends can view it." Then it disappeared for months, and I assume it was rejected and thrown away without a "pardon us", only to discover some genius has sent it to the state capital. No one ever explained anything, and the local librarian claims to have no knowledge of what happened to it.

That's why I'll never again donate anything to my local library system, cause they don't have a clue what they're doling.

However, all the U.S. regional libraries are tied together (at least within states) with a 'library lending program' where you can order a book kept in one library to read in another library, so maybe it was part of that (regional cataloguing), but once again, it just demonstrates a complete lack of any oversight in the program.

Replies:   JohnBobMead
JohnBobMead
Updated:

@Crumbly Writer

It may be the State Library is the Last Copy repository for the libraries in your state.

The concept of Last Copy repositories is that when the last copy available within the state is weeded from its holding collection, it will be sent to a library that receives funding to keep that last copy, so that it still exists somewhere within the state. It's much easier to obtain a copy from in-state via ILL than from out-of-state; many libraries will not loan materials out-of-state, while they recieve public funds to loan within state.

So, if it's the only copy within the state, and it doesn't look like anyone else will be obtaining a copy for their collection, they sometimes send it to the Last Copy repository as soon as it comes into their hands, if they don't perceive sufficient local interest to keep it locally for a while.

Processing, etc., takes time and costs money, and there is limited shelf space, if they don't see adding it to their collection as being cost-effective they'll dispose of it some way or another. Having it wind up at the State Library was better than having it show up at the next Friends of the Library sale; it's still available, just not readily available.

This is why I always check with the Collection Development staff prior to donating an item to a library; I want to make sure they agree that it would be a good thing to add to their collection, and that they foresee keeping it for a while.

KimLittle

Open challenge to anyone to write an impregnation story called "Seeding The Neighbourhod Library".

Replies:   Bondi Beach
Bondi Beach

@KimLittle

Open challenge to anyone to write an impregnation story called "Seeding The Neighbourhod Library".


Seeding the neighborhood librarian might be fun. Remembering that not all librarians are female, of course.

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Replies:   Capt. Zapp
Capt. Zapp

@Bondi Beach

Bondi Beach 12/27/2017, 6:47:12 PM

@KimLittle
Open challenge to anyone to write an impregnation story called "Seeding The Neighbourhod Library".

Seeding the neighborhood librarian might be fun. Remembering that not all librarians are female, of course.

bb


Of course the story could be about seeding unsuspecting females in the dark corners of the library.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@Capt. Zapp

Of course the story could be about seeding unsuspecting females in the dark corners of the library.

Or, in keeping with the threads original messages, it could be seeing the library books via the overnight book deposit slip. Yeouch!

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