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Title Case Question

Crumbly Writer

Silly questions, but ...

How would you capitalize the following in title case (as a chapter title)?

"14: On-the-Job Training"

Do you capitalize each word, or do you treat the hyphenated words as a single word regarding capitalization (i.e. you don't hyphenate them)?

"14: On-the-job Training"

Replies:   Switch Blayde
aubie56

As a title, it should be "14: On-the-Job Training"

Crumbly Writer

Thanks, I wasn't sure. That makes sense, as it is four separate words, even if hyphenated.

richardshagrin

I am pretty sure you could do it either way, if you stay consistent. Or if you want to use really old methods, you could use XIV for 14.

Switch Blayde

@Crumbly Writer

"14: On-the-job Training"


I would do it that way. "On-the-job" is one word, an adjective modifying the noun "training."

Crumbly Writer

@Switch Blayde

"On-the-job" is one word, an adjective modifying the noun "training."

That was essentially my question, is a multi-word adjective considered a single word, or only a conglomeration of words for reading convenience?

garymrssn
Updated:

"When capitalizing titles, capitalize both words in a hyphenated compound word: Natural-Born Cyborgs."

Source: https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/2/

I hope this helps.

Replies:   Switch Blayde
Switch Blayde

@garymrssn

I hope this helps.


It did for me. Thanks.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@Switch Blayde

It did for me. Thanks.

For me, too. Double-Thanks! 'D

Ernest Bywater

@Switch Blayde

"On-the-job" is one word, an adjective modifying the noun "training."


I agree, but would abbreviate it to OTJ despite the correct way being OtJ

Crumbly Writer

@Ernest Bywater

I agree, but would abbreviate it to OTJ despite the correct way being OtJ

According to Gary, and Purdue University (our most authoritative reference at this point), that's not the case. When you create a modifying adjective, you don't create an entirely new word, you simply string the words together with dashes to make it easier to parse. Thus you capitalize it as you would all the other words.

By the way, I'm not about to abbreviate my chapter titles! 'D

Capt Zapp

@Ernest Bywater

would abbreviate it to OTJ


In my experience, On-the-Job Training has been abbreviated OJT

garymrssn

@Ernest Bywater

My quick search says that OJT is an acronym for On-the-Job Training. As is usual in most acronyms "the" is omitted. Nothing authoritative though. I found the capitalization reference yesterday by blind squirrel luck.
Note: I almost said all acronyms. Then I remembered we were discussing English. There are almost no all inclusive statements applicable to the English language.

Replies:   Grant
Grant

@garymrssn

There are almost no all inclusive statements applicable to the English language.

The rules for English are all set in stone and un-wavering; except for the exceptions, and the exceptions to the exceptions.

richardshagrin
Updated:

Another issue (than the exceptions to the exceptions) is that there are a large number of different English Languages. For example, Australian, American, Scottish (do I have too many "t" s in Scottish? not enough?), Canadian (eh), variations over time (is Shakespearian still the English Language? Chaucer?), the Islands of Great Britain has more dialects than I have fingers, several in London alone.

I suppose there is an ideal (Queen's?) English that most speakers depart from in some ways. Or what the BBC broadcasts, mostly. Maybe just selected announcers. Some of the Sports Announcers haven't spoken English in years. Maybe I generalize from what I remember from broadcasts in the USA.

I suppose in the final analysis English is what gets taught in a school's English classes. Most of the time, not even the teacher speaks like that.

I seem to remember Winston Churchill saying that not ending a sentence with a preposition being the kind of nonsence up with which I shall not put.

tppm

I would spell and capitalize it "On the Job Training", no hyphens.

Replies:   Grant  Crumbly Writer  Zom
Grant

@tppm

I would spell and capitalize it "On the Job Training", no hyphens.

Same here.

Crumbly Writer

@tppm

I would spell and capitalize it "On the Job Training", no hyphens.

That's how I had it initially, but I'd rather not announce I can't punctuate in my story index, preferring my readers discover that the old fashioned way, by reading my stories.

Adverbs get hyphenated, in titles or not. Most readers may not notice, but a surprising amount are real sticklers about details like that.

Zom

@tppm

'On-the-Job Training' and 'On the Job Training' can have different meanings.

It is also acceptable to use 'On-The-Job Training' in a heading or title.

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