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Beyond Concierge Service

pocketrocket

In one of my stories a wedding reception takes place in the ballroom of New York's famous Plaza hotel. It is a full formal dance/ball. The bride requires assistance putting on her gown, so a staff girl is assigned. A small BDSM scene ensues.

Afterward the staffer and bride part, never to meet again. However, the staffer is left with panties in hand and instructions to find someone to put them on again. She confesses all to her boss, who sends her to a woman elsewhere in the hotel with "experience in this sort of thing."

This raised the question, what sort of services would an elite hotel provide for its guests. In this case a semi-professional Domme is envisioned, with the staffer playing the role of assistant/submissive. How would that work? What sort of thing would be in keeping with the high profile image?

Discrete services could go in many other directions. What are some ideas?

Geek of Ages

@pocketrocket

Some hotels offer a laundry service, which seems appropriate for a pair of panties...

Crumbly Writer

Alas, very few hotels offer either professional 'dates' or kinky hookups, mainly because it's illegal and the city could close the entire establishment down if they wanted (see the Heidi Fleiss fiasco some years back).

What's more likely, is a patron will approach the concierge and ask for some 'help in finding a ... particular type of service'. Nothing is explicitly said, with it all being of the 'wink-wink, nudge-nudge' variety, but he'll generally give the hotel patron an idea of where to go and who to contact, but again, everything takes place completely independently of the hotel.

By and large, most such activities take place with common street walkers working with the lower-class hotels than with the top-of-the-line establishments.

What's more common than either of those scenarios, is what you may have seen in "Fifty Shades of Gray", where individuals work out an arrangement ahead of time, and they meet after the 'customer' rents a nice room in the nicer hotel. In that case, since it's two private individuals, the hotel is not involved at all and has absolutely no interest in what goes on (though they'll pay attention if they see a particular 'working girl' hanging out too much, again because it gives the establishment a bad reputation).

At best, the 'staffers' boss would either take the panties himself, have them cleaned and then toss them into the communal 'lost and found', or he's subtly suggest she take it to the concierge herself and offer him as much of a 'tip' as she can afford. However, that would be extremely rare, as it would be a fireable offense for all three parties if anyone ever found out about it.

robberhands

@Crumbly Writer

'fireable'

Is that a comparable term to 'inflammable' or 'flammable', as was discussed before in another thread?

Replies:   Ross at Play
Ross at Play

@robberhands

CW:
'fireable'
You:
Is that a comparable term to 'inflammable' or 'flammable'

In Britain and Australia, we often say someone is 'sacked' or 'given the sack' from a job, and we would describe something as being a 'sackable offence'.

awnlee jawking

@Ross at Play

In Britain and Australia, we often say someone is 'sacked' or 'given the sack' from a job, and we would describe something as being a 'sackable offence'.


While that's true, the jargon used by Human Resource Departments tends to be more pretentious eg 'terminated' rather than 'sacked'.

For the benefit of Americans, in this context 'terminated' doesn't usually mean 'killed', although there are a few obvious exceptions - Dr David Kelly, Princess Di ;)

AJ

Ross at Play

@awnlee jawking

While that's true, the jargon used by Human Resource Departments tends to be more pretentious eg 'terminated' rather than 'sacked'.

Meanwhile, upper management rationalise their actions by saying positions have been 'rationalised'.

Replies:   awnlee jawking
robberhands

@awnlee jawking

I see. So 'fire' and 'sack' are common terms used instead of 'terminate' in regards to employees. Do you also fire, sack or terminate a no longer wanted lover, or do you have to ditch them? Or maybe you can ditch an employee, too?

Dominions Son

@Crumbly Writer

By and large, most such activities take place with common street walkers working with the lower-class hotels than with the top-of-the-line establishments.


Los Vegas might be an exception. The street walking style of prostitution is illegal, but as I understand it, the generally higher class call-out prostitution services are not.

Also, one of the east coast states, I don't remember which one right now, recently amended it's prostitution laws with the intent of increasing penalties for street walking and they accidentally legalized brothels and call-out services.

Dominions Son

@robberhands

Or maybe you can ditch an employee, too?


You can, though it's a bit more difficult. I remember reading about a case where a mid-level manager type with a key to the office goes on vacation. When he gets back from vacation, he discovers that his employer moved with-out informing him and the office to which he still has a key is now vacant.

Replies:   Joe Long
Ross at Play

@robberhands

I see. So 'fire' and 'sack' are common terms used instead of 'terminate' in regards to employees. Do you also fire, sack or terminate a no longer wanted lover, or do you have to ditch them? Or maybe you can ditch an employee, too?

Other common terms for dismissal from a job are: boot, can, axe (or ax in AmE). Ditch is only something the employer does.

For relationships, if not living together, mostly: ditch, dump, drop. If living together, either someone leaves, or the other is kicked/booted/chucked out.

These lists are not exhaustive.

Switch Blayde

@pocketrocket

I would strongly suggest you do not use the name of a real hotel. You can be sued putting them in a bad light.

So with a fictitious grand hotel, you can have the concierge people provide any services your imagination can come up with.

awnlee jawking

@Ross at Play

Meanwhile, upper management rationalise their actions by saying positions have been 'rationalised'.


I'm somewhat out of touch but last I heard, 'downsizing' had been superseded by 'right-sizing' ;)

AJ

Ernest Bywater

@robberhands

Do you also fire, sack or terminate a no longer wanted lover, or do you have to ditch them?


That's been covered in a song - 50 ways to lose a lover.

pcbondsman

@Dominions Son

Los Vegas might be an exception. The street walking style of prostitution is illegal, but as I understand it, the generally higher class call-out prostitution services are not.


Though it's been thirty plus years since I lived there any type of prostitution in Clark County (Las Vegas is a large part of the county population wise.) is illegal. How closely it's monitored by the Clark County Sheriff's department (Las Vegas Metro PD, is a part of that organization) I can't speak to, I've been away too long.

I can't speak for all the hotels but the bigger ones "monitored" prostitutes who liked to work in them. For the most part those who didn't cause trouble (rolling john's, etc) were left alone although there may have been exchanges of money for turned heads. Whether the higher end hotels would make arrangements for you I don't know, though a few bucks slipped to the right person might get you a telephone number or other assistance. (Note: cell phones were not a big thing at the time I lived there.)

There was/is lots of advertising for the "houses"/"ranches" in and around Parumph, which is in a different county where prostitution is legal. Some even offer limo service to and from their business. I can't say for sure but I doubt that's changed.

I can't find confirmation of this but the east coast state you mentioned may have been Delaware. I seem to recall that at one time they allowed "house" type prostitution. I know nothing about if/how it was regulated.

Bondi Beach

@Switch Blayde

I would strongly suggest you do not use the name of a real hotel. You can be sued putting them in a bad light.


Excellent writing challenge. You could use just about every detail you know about the Plaza to create your fictional hotel. Done well enough, the reader will enjoy the story just as much as if it took place in the real Plaza (which I believe is no longer a hotel).

bb

Replies:   pocketrocket
Crumbly Writer

@Ross at Play

In Britain and Australia, we often say someone is 'sacked' or 'given the sack' from a job, and we would describe something as being a 'sackable offence'.

"Fireable" is probably a uniquely American usage. It isn't typically used by HR departments, or in corporate announcements, but often, when company employees or executives are discussing details with HR or their lawyers, they'll ask "is this a fireable offense" (i.e. if I fire this cocksucker, will the company end up paying hundreds of millions and I'll be sacked due to why I consider him a jackass).

Replies:   samuelmichaels
Crumbly Writer

@robberhands

Do you also fire, sack or terminate a no longer wanted lover, or do you have to ditch them? Or maybe you can ditch an employee, too?

Typically, you either disappear or leave a simple text "Done. See 'ya."

Crumbly Writer

@Dominions Son

Los Vegas might be an exception. The street walking style of prostitution is illegal, but as I understand it, the generally higher class call-out prostitution services are not.

That's true, but 'legal' prostitutes are licensed, and the license is typically tied to a particular 'ranch', NOT prestigious hotels!

Crumbly Writer

@Switch Blayde

I would strongly suggest you do not use the name of a real hotel. You can be sued putting them in a bad light.

Yet another reason for using the concierge approach. That way, the hotel is not at fault, the entirely fictional concierge is the only one committing an illegal act. It avoids hostile, defensive reactions, it sounds more plausible (i.e. the entire hotel chain isn't entirely corrupt) and it adds a mild story complication which allows you to interject conflicting personalities between the various parites (i.e. what does the girl have to go to get the concierge to supply the information without anyone having to explicitly state what they desire). But then, I like story complications, and tend to seek them out rather than trying to minimize them.

pocketrocket

@Bondi Beach

I have a suitable venue already, though much smaller.

Several people have touched on the issue I came up against--discrete is OK but illegal is not. I was thinking a no sexual contact (by staff) service. Toys, restraints, and expertise the hotel could supply legally.

Replies:   REP
REP

@pocketrocket

I was thinking a no sexual contact (by staff) service. Toys, restraints, and expertise the hotel could supply legally.


A second problem in the real world is a business's reputation. Just because it isn't illegal, doesn't mean customers will approve. The hotel's services will become public knowledge, and then reputable customers will avoid the hotel. Of course they may get a short term boost in reservations by those who hope the services extend into illegal activity, but business's need long term customers to survive.

In our fantasy worlds, illegal and legal but immoral conduct is permissible. If we build a fantasy society based on sexual activities that are considered immoral in our real world, the hotel can get away with your idea. In that world, sexual contact between customer and staff could be defined as a good thing.

As Authors, we control the morality of the environment in which we write. I forget the Author, title, and details of the book, but in the story the MC is driving to another city. He is tired so he pulls into a Relaxation Station to rest and relieve his sexual tensions. All legal and moral in that Author's society and it definitely made the point that sexual morality had changed from what it is now.

I've done something similar in one of my stories by making prostitution legal and moral and placing a person from our society in that setting in order to show the reader that the morality of the fantasy social structure in which the MC was raised is very different from our society's morality.

Replies:   pocketrocket
sejintenej

@awnlee jawking

While that's true, the jargon used by Human Resource Departments tends to be more pretentious eg 'terminated' rather than 'sacked'.

For the benefit of Americans, in this context 'terminated' doesn't usually mean 'killed', although there are a few obvious exceptions - Dr David Kelly, Princess Di ;)


I suggest that it is not the concierge but the doorman who might be approached.
Is the doorman actually employed by the hotel? In some of the really top umpteen stars hotels the doorman is not paid by the hotel - he may even pay the hotel for the job because the sum total of the tips can be astronomical.
Of course such a doorman knows everyone and everything and can perform miracles. He would size up the hotel guest and if suitable might "know a few names and phone numbers" and turn a blind eye if the guest returns accompanied.

pocketrocket

@REP

Your points are well taken, but evade the question. The hotel's reputation is a given. How far would the hotel be willing to bend discrete assistance before the reputation is tarnished. It is already commonly believed that top hotels do call girl referrals, which is outright illegal if true.

Consider that off-site service is possible.

Replies:   REP
Joe Long

@Ross at Play

In Britain and Australia, we often say someone is 'sacked'


If she's good in the sack, of course I'd sack her.

Replies:   Joe_Bondi_Beach
Joe Long

@Dominions Son

I once took my girlfriend out on a date and returned her to an empty house.

Her parents had found a new place but assured us they weren't moving for a couple days.

Replies:   Capt. Zapp
Joe_Bondi_Beach

@Joe Long

If she's good in the sack, of course I'd sack her.


More than once, even ...

bb

Capt. Zapp

@Joe Long

I once took my girlfriend out on a date and returned her to an empty house.

Her parents had found a new place but assured us they weren't moving for a couple days.


And she still lives with you?

Replies:   Joe Long
REP

@pocketrocket

Your points are well taken, but evade the question


If you are asking the question in regard to the real world, a non-evasive answer would require me having knowledge of the country and area in which the hotel is located, the laws applicable to the local area, the moral code of the society, and the specific activities in which the hotel and its employees would engage.

If you are asking in regard to a fictional story, then there are no limits.

It is already commonly believed that top hotels do call girl referrals, which is outright illegal if true.


In some places, prostitution is legal, so the effects of providing such a service in such an area could only be assessed in the terms of the area's moral code.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@REP

If you are asking in regard to a fictional story, then there are no limits.

The original question seemed to ask what would be the 'standard procedure' at most high-quality hotels, so that's how most of us directed our answer. Of course, in fiction you can create all kinds of scenarios, but in most cases, where a companies reputation means their success or failure over time, they'll largely ignore what patrons do inside their facilities, but won't tolerate anyone who threatens their livelihood by drawing undesirable attention to them brand.

That doesn't mean such activities don't happen (double negative there), but it means the management will at least attempt to keep such services at arm's distance, at least. Thus my advice about keeping the employees direct supervisor out of the story.

Replies:   REP
samuelmichaels

@Crumbly Writer

"Fireable" is probably a uniquely American usage. It isn't typically used by HR departments, or in corporate announcements, but often, when company employees or executives are discussing details with HR or their lawyers, they'll ask "is this a fireable offense" (i.e. if I fire this cocksucker, will the company end up paying hundreds of millions and I'll be sacked due to why I consider him a jackass).

I am more familiar with the term "firing" offense. And the nature of the offense is not as important as membership in a protected class.

REP

@Crumbly Writer

The original question seemed to ask what would be the 'standard procedure' at most high-quality hotels, so that's how most of us directed our answer


Yes, his question was:

This raised the question, what sort of services would an elite hotel provide for its guests.


However, I also noticed that everything before that question was about his fictional story. Everything after the question was about the story and integrating ideas into the story.

As you said, real world hotels don't provide the types of services Pocketrocket seems to be asking for, and Management discourages their employees from becoming involved in such activities. Yes the activities happen, but I doubt the activities are sanctioned or supported by the hotel.

With that in mind, we can certainly provide him with ideas that a fictional hotel might provide. In one of my stories, the MC called up a TV menu with pictures of the Hotel's stable of prostitutes and a description of their specialties, which guests could order for the night. Don't bother looking for the MCs escapades weren't described, and explaining why I added the scene would take too long.

Thus my advice about keeping the employees direct supervisor out of the story.


Good advice if he wants it close to reality. Otherwise, it won't matter. So the real question is, what is Pocketrocket trying to achieve in his story - something close to reality or just pure fiction?

Joe Long

@Capt. Zapp

And she still lives with you?

Be married 33 years in a couple weeks

Crumbly Writer

@REP

Good advice if he wants it close to reality. Otherwise, it won't matter. So the real question is, what is Pocketrocket trying to achieve in his story - something close to reality or just pure fiction?

He seemed intent on using a real-world hotel. In that case, you can't paint it in that kind of fantasy world (at least not without risking a lawsuit if they somehow discover it). He needs to decide whether he wants reality, fiction or fantasy. But, as he describes it, it didn't seem like it would take that much of a stretch if he simply switched around a few characters.

Replies:   Joe Long  pocketrocket  REP
Joe Long

@Crumbly Writer

He seemed intent on using a real-world hotel. In that case, you can't paint it in that kind of fantasy world (at least not without risking a lawsuit if they somehow discover it).


My story uses names of some real-life regional chain restaurants and convenience stores, but never negative. Always neutral or positive.

pocketrocket

@Crumbly Writer

Not exactly. I was asking how a real world hotel would deal with the request.

On one hand the hotel has a reputation and relationship with law enforcement. On the other hand the hotel needs happy customers. The hotel could officially turn a blind eye, within reason. The question is where the lines are drawn. If things could not be done inside the hotel, offsite is an option.

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son

@pocketrocket

Not exactly. I was asking how a real world hotel would deal with the request.


Again, where and when matters. There are places around the world where prostitution is legal.

Then there's Los Vegas. There was a time when most of the hotels and casino's in Vegas were run by or connected to the mafia. A hotel like that wouldn't care much about the legal niceties as long as things were handled discretely so as not to come to the notice of either the law or more law abiding customers.

REP
Updated:

@Crumbly Writer


He seemed intent on using a real-world hotel.


It 'seemed' to whom?

I didn't get the impression he wanted to use a real-world hotel. I did get the sense that he wanted to use services that a real-world hotel would provide.

richardshagrin

@Crumbly Writer

a fireable offense

Perhaps, "fired with enthusiasm."

sejintenej

@REP

As you said, real world hotels don't provide the types of services Pocketrocket seems to be asking for, and Management discourages their employees from becoming involved in such activities. Yes the activities happen, but I doubt the activities are sanctioned or supported by the hotel.

If you think about Australia and the Netherlands (which have legal prostitution) it might happen. However the story is set in New York which has a "different" set of morals

awnlee jawking

@REP

As you said, real world hotels don't provide the types of services Pocketrocket seems to be asking for, and Management discourages their employees from becoming involved in such activities. Yes the activities happen, but I doubt the activities are sanctioned or supported by the hotel.


It's funny how celebs can end up in a luxury hotel in a strange city where they don't know anyone and they always seem to be able to obtain hard drugs to make the parties in their suites go with a swing :(

AJ

Replies:   JohnBobMead
JohnBobMead

@awnlee jawking

It's funny how celebs can end up in a luxury hotel in a strange city where they don't know anyone and they always seem to be able to obtain hard drugs to make the parties in their suites go with a swing :(

AJ


There was a Doonesbury Cartoon many years ago, where Zonker's Uncle Duke is on the phone, saying, "This is Doctor Duke, I need to get some drugs and left my prescription pad at home." voice replies "Sure thing! What do you need?" Duke finished the call, turned to the Bellhop in the room with him, handed him some money with the comment "That's a marvelous talent you have, don't abuse it."

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