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Words of the day - prolepsis & sideshadowing

Switch Blayde

From a wikipedia article on foreshadowing.

A similar device is the flashforward (also known as prolepsis). However, foreshadowing only hints at a possible outcome within the confinement of a narrative. A flashforward is a scene that takes the narrative forward in time from the current point of the story.


By analogy to foreshadowing, the literary critic Gary Morson described its opposite, sideshadowing.[7] Found notably in the epic novels of Leo Tolstoy and Fyodor Dostoyevsky, it is the practice of including scenes that turn out to have no relevance to the plot. This, according to Morson, increases the verisimilitude of the fiction because the audience knows that in real life, unlike in novels, most events are in fact inconsequential. This "sense of structurelessness" invites the audience to "interpret and question the events that actually do come to pass".


Sideshadowing goes against the "If it doesn't move the plot forward, delete it." Although, it might explain why the Russian novels are so long.

Replies:   robberhands
robberhands
Updated:

@Switch Blayde


Sideshadowing goes against the "If it doesn't move the plot forward, delete it."


I disagree. Sideshadowing is a plot on its own. The plot being to mislead the reader, an always worthwhile undertaking.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@robberhands

I disagree. Sideshadowing is a plot on its own. The plot being to mislead the reader, an always worthwhile undertaking.

What's more—remembering back to my Russian Lit days back in high school and college—they typically visited the 'everyday' hardships and joys of Russian life during those periods (during times of economic struggles and war), and thus 'set the scene', which does advance the plot, although not directly.

Now when are we going to discuss Undershadowing and Around-the-corner shadowing?

Replies:   Switch Blayde
awnlee jawking

If you write a time-travel story and you foreshadow something that's going to happen in a trip to the past, is that backshadowing?

AJ

Replies:   Joe Long
Dominions Son

Now when are we going to discuss Undershadowing and Around-the-corner shadowing?


I a story starts with "It was a dark and stormy night..." is that over shadowing? :)

Switch Blayde

@Crumbly Writer

Now when are we going to discuss Undershadowing


There is something called backshadowing

Joe Long

@awnlee jawking

If you write a time-travel story and you foreshadow something that's going to happen in a trip to the past, is that backshadowing?


It may be in the global past but it's still in the character's personal future, as he has yet to experience it for himself (even if others have already observed it)

Replies:   awnlee jawking
awnlee jawking

@Joe Long

My post was intended in jest, but following SB's post I looked up 'backshadowing'. The term actually exists, and I got the meaning pretty close!

Language CAN sometimes be logical :)

AJ

Replies:   Ernest Bywater  Joe Long
Ernest Bywater

@awnlee jawking

Language CAN sometimes be logical :)


and it's usually accidental when it is.

Joe Long

@awnlee jawking

My post was intended in jest


and I was using a self-deprecating form of pedantism where I know you've said something in jest and then deliberately respond in all seriousness as a form of subtle sarcasm.

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