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Embedding Fonts in pdf files

Crumbly Writer

I'm having a hell of a time creating pdf files to submit to a new site. I embed ALL the included fonts, but the resulting .pdf file keeps reporting the non-embedded Arial and Times New Roman fonts, despite the fact that they don't occur in my document (searching for the font turns up nothing).

How the hell do I dump unused fonts from a file, and how do I determine which Styles use which fonts? (When I search for Arial, I sometimes get "Normal" listed as Arial, despite my having redefined it as Garmond. Is there some way to turn off the default fonts?

I'm out of ideas and no longer know where to turn. Any ideas?

Replies:   REP
REP

@Crumbly Writer

I know nothing about PDF files, but could they be default fonts that are permanently embedded in the PDF file?

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
graybyrd

A PDF file _must_ include a font, or it wouldn't display. Obviously its set up to use your system fonts to create the PDF output. If its a problem, you'll need to investigate what default fonts your particular PDF creator software is set to use.

All I can really refer to is my Mac which offers PDF as an alternate printing choice: "print to PDF." If my document contains an optional font, such as Garamond, that font will appear in my PDF file. As for Windows output... I can't say.

Observing Ernest's caution, I'd be sure that nothing but standard system fonts are included in a PDF meant for ebook publication, lest the licensing fairy rise up and ding you. I looked them up as I have a favorite font I prefer for text. The licensing fees for publication are horribly costly, and you pay that fee again & again for _each_ book you publish.

Replies:   Ernest Bywater
Ernest Bywater

@graybyrd

lest the licensing fairy rise up and ding you. I looked them up as I have a favorite font I prefer for text. The licensing fees for publication are horribly costly, and you pay that fee again & again for _each_ book you publish.


which is exactly why I don't embed the fonts in the e-pub file, so it's left up to the reader's viewer. That also helps for readers who have special viewing needs. I do the same with the files I lodge for HTML file I make for myself and SoL / FS / SciFi. The PDF for the print-ready file at Lulu is another matter, I embed the Palatino Linotype font in that because Lulu has the licensing side covered for me.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@REP

I know nothing about PDF files, but could they be default fonts that are permanently embedded in the PDF file?

The restriction, by the book publishing source, Ingram-Sparks, is that ALL fonts in the book must be embedded. It's a standard restriction, but I've never had a problem with the same files succeeded with CreateSpace, so I examined the pdf file, and each of the two unembedded fonts (Arials and Times New Roman) aren't used in the document.

Instead, I suspect they're flagged because there are entries for certain formatting Styles which list "complex fonts" (which obviously aren't used anywhere, and are reserved primarily for foreign language usages. I'm thinking I'll need to abandon my use of the "Normal" Style and create my own (uncomplicated styles) instead of relying on the existing fonts.

@graybyrd

A PDF file _must_ include a font, or it wouldn't display. Obviously its set up to use your system fonts to create the PDF output. If its a problem, you'll need to investigate what default fonts your particular PDF creator software is set to use.


All the fonts I'm using (and the only ones which need to be printed) are embedded. The only two which aren't aren't used in the source document (a WORD file).

I'm reluctant to permanently delete system/default WORD styles, as it's likely to prevent WORD from operating in the future when something it requires is no longer available.

I'm very cautious about my font usages, but I can't control which WORD defaults get included. At the moment, I'm guessing I've got to abandon the idea of using Ingram-Sparks, which has a bad reputation for being difficult to manage and requiring a LOT of low-level technical manipulation like this.

Replies:   REP
Crumbly Writer

@Ernest Bywater

which is exactly why I don't embed the fonts in the e-pub file, so it's left up to the reader's viewer.

The file is being used (and rejected) by a book printing company, so they need the fonts embedded so they can print the fonts and to guarantee that I own the licenses needed. It's also confusing why extra unused fonts are included, or why one company flatly rejects the file when there's no need to print using the fonts and other sources don't flag those as errors. In short, I have no clue how to proceed from this point.

REP

@Crumbly Writer

I'm thinking I'll need to abandon my use of the "Normal" Style and create my own (uncomplicated styles) instead of relying on the existing fonts.


Will that work for you?

The "Normal" style does not use another style [i.e. (no style)] as the foundation for its style definition. However, in a set of styles, "Normal" is typically used as the foundation style for the other styles, and the other styles just change certain style characteristics to create their style definition.

If in defining your style set without using the "Normal" style as the basis for any of your style definitions and you include one of these "complex fonts" in one of your style definitions, which you use in the document, won't you have the same problem.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer
Updated:

@REP


If in defining your style set without using the "Normal" style as the basis for any of your style definitions and you include one of these "complex fonts" in one of your style definitions, which you use in the document, won't you have the same problem.


At least in this current book, I'm not using a complex foreign languages (16-bit), so I should be safe. I tried it, but of course, it requires changing every single line of text (every single italic or bold character also has the complex attribute, so I'll have to trash all my in-line formatting too).

At this point, it just doesn't seem worth the extreme effort—especially given there's no guarantee I'll ever sell as much as a single book through this newbie source, and they also charge a fortune ($95 per year and $35 per revision).

There doesn't seem to be any rhythm or reason why WORD is including these extraneous, unused fonts, or why this source would care if it doesn't need to use those fonts, but it looks Ingram-Sparks, as it currently stands, isn't a viable option! :(

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