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Forum: Editors/Reviewers Hangout

Looking for an editor.

StaticBat83
Updated:

Update. I have finished my story Titled Elena. Would there be anyone interested in taking a look at it and helping me with edits. I was told that some things in it seemed a bit detached and made it difficult to follow. I want to fix that. That is only one of a few things I want help with the story.

Hi. I'm looking for someone who'd be interested in editing my stories. At the moment I'm just looking for one story to be edited. If you want I can wait for it to be finished. It's partially already on the site. Here is a link. https://storiesonline.net/s/18323/elena

Crumbly Writer

It's always best to include an editor early on in the process, so they can help with formatting, organizing and structure, though many editors prefer to edit everything in one go, others will help you structure your files.

When asking for editorial help, it's always best to provide your story information upfront, so listing the story title, story description, genre and codes help (so editors have an idea whether the story appeals to them or not). Otherwise, they'll help with a chapter or two, and then you're back to searching for new editors again.

Safe_Bet

To add to what CW said, I'd also make it VERY clear to prospective editors that you STRONGLY intend to complete the story

For example you have 50% of you stories showing I & I (which I believe is what CW was trying to "tactfully" impart.) " Incomplete and Inactive"-s seriously piss off editors who volunteer a lot of free time and effort and are pretty much a slap in the chops as thanks.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@Safe_Bet

For example you have 50% of you stories showing I & I (which I believe is what CW was trying to "tactfully" impart.) " Incomplete and Inactive"-s seriously piss off editors who volunteer a lot of free time and effort and are pretty much a slap in the chops as thanks.

With luck, editors may be able to help you with whatever issues (besides boredom) keep you from completing your stories. In not, you may want to consider Content Editors. They're rarer, but they'll quickly identify any outstanding story issues likely to bite you in the ass later. However, they'll typically ride you hard, refusing to back down on any outstanding issues (which is why they're so valuable).

Replies:   Michael Loucks
Michael Loucks

@Crumbly Writer

you may want to consider Content Editors. They're rarer, but they'll quickly identify any outstanding story issues likely to bite you in the ass later. However, they'll typically ride you hard, refusing to back down on any outstanding issues (which is why they're so valuable).


I have one of these and he is invaluable. Some of his suggestions are over-the-top, but I've learned to discern when he's yanking my chain or making a real 'suggestion'. :-)

Ernest Bywater

My basic rule is when an editor marks something with a change or needing looking at I give it a damn good look. Often I'll accept their change or re-write the section with either a different word choice or different word order to clarify what i want to say. It's very rare anything and editor marks is ignored and left as I had it, very rare, but does happen. Often it's due to the specific wording has a specific purpose for later, thus I don't want it clarified yet.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@Ernest Bywater

My basic rule is when an editor marks something with a change or needing looking at I give it a damn good look. Often I'll accept their change or re-write the section with either a different word choice or different word order to clarify what i want to say. It's very rare anything and editor marks is ignored and left as I had it, very rare, but does happen. Often it's due to the specific wording has a specific purpose for later, thus I don't want it clarified yet.

I agree. If an editor marks something as an issue, I take it seriously. If I choose to ignore it, and they come back again, arguing the case, then I consider revising the passage to either eliminate the problematic wording, or address the issues.

If I don't make any changes, I'll tell the editor why I chose to keep it, so they can then counter argue if I haven't understood their objection by presenting further information I wasn't initially aware of.

Ross at Play

Editors sometimes end up feeling like they're in a no-win situation. They want the final to be as good as possible but have no authority to insist on anything.

I accept that and feel it frees me to throw up options for an author to consider. I think no harm can come from that because the author always makes the final choice.

I think the point at which an editor oversteps their authority is if they fail to adapt as they learn about an author's style preferences. They should not suggest a change to a style they prefer if they know the author prefers otherwise. A black-and-white example of that would be an editor inserting Oxford Commas when they know the author does not want them. I disapprove of that.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@Ross at Play

Editors sometimes end up feeling like they're in a no-win situation. They want the final to be as good as possible but have no authority to insist on anything.

Good points, but ...

There also comes a time when an editor insists that they way a particular author chooses to do something is just flat out wrong, keeps providing examples and explanations for why it won't work, but the author refuses to budge.

That's often when the editor steps back, says 'I don't want my name on this product, as it'll make me look like I don't know what I'm doing' and drops out of the project.

Sadly, that happens fairly often, over a wide range of issues. Not all authors and editors match up and see eye to eye, and it's good to recognize that a clash of wills and/or personalities is largely inevitable. Bottom line, the author follows what he things best speaks for the story, while the editors rests his reputation on the works that his name is associated with.

Replies:   PotomacBob
PotomacBob

@Crumbly Writer

At SOL, it is the author, and not the editor, who pushes the final button to commit the story for publication.
In some news organizations, it can go either way, and there are always disputes among editors and reporters. In most places, the reporter has one final tool - and can require that his/her byline be removed from the story if the disagreement is strong enough. Most news organizations WANT stories to have a byline - an indication that they had a reporter physically present in the dateline community. Without a byline, it looks like they depended on a stringer.

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