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Middle of the year

richardshagrin

There might be a story idea in the "fact" that the middle of the year is not the moment when June 30th becomes July 1. That is when the seventh month of twelve begins. But most of the time there are 365 days in a year. That means the 183rd day is the midpoint of the year. (182 days times two is 364.) But thanks to the Romans who gave us most of the calendar we use February only has 28 days. Julius and Augustus Caesar decided their months, July and August, would be at least as large as any other month, and the days disappeared from February. Which was the last month in the Latin Calendar, the year started in March. Notice September is related to the Latin for 7, October to 8, November to 9 and December to 10.

So the 183rd day in 2018 AD (in Latin, anno domini, the year of the lord) is July 2nd. I submit for your consideration at noon on July 2nd the year is half over, and half remains to come. If you think the year is half over now, if you are reading this July 1, 2018, wait until noon July 2nd to celebrate.

I am not sure how this might make a story, but it didn't seem to fit anywhere else. Maybe time travelers get somewhere later than they expected because they asked to go half a year?

Replies:   Jim S
Banadin
Updated:

Lets don't forget the change from the Julian to the Gregorian Calendar. At change time they went from October 4, 1582 to October 15, 1582. Except the British didn't do it until 1752. They used the same October dates. This included all the colonies.

Then to add some spice they changed the legal new years day from March 25, Ladies Day to January 1.

Put that in your time travel machine and smoke it.

P.S. The change was not done at the same time in all European Countries. You have to research them. China didn't change until 1919.

Replies:   AmigaClone  PotomacBob
AmigaClone

@Banadin

P.S. The change was not done at the same time in all European Countries. You have to research them. China didn't change until 1919.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adoption_of_the_Gregorian_calendar

Jim S

@richardshagrin

If you think the year is half over now, if you are reading this July 1, 2018, wait until noon July 2nd to celebrate.

Well, if you want to be really precise, a year is actually 365.2425 days long. That's one full trip around the Sun. So half a year is actually July 2nd at 12:00 p.m. + 0.12125 days if you ignore leap year. More or less. :)

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@Jim S

Well, if you want to be really precise, a year is actually 365.2425 days long. That's one full trip around the Sun. So half a year is actually July 2nd at 12:00 p.m. + 0.12125 days if you ignore leap year. More or less. :)

Don't forget that the Earth's rotation is continually slowing over time, so that extra 0.12125 days will keep getting longer (or shorter when you travel backwards through time).

Replies:   Jim S  Dominions Son
Jim S

@Crumbly Writer

Don't forget that the Earth's rotation is continually slowing over time, so that extra 0.12125 days will keep getting longer (or shorter when you travel backwards through time).

Celestial mechanics isn't my strong suit but somewhere along the line I found that the year is getting longer as Earth is slowing in it's orbit. Seemed counterintuitive for some reason but who am I to argue with science.

Dominions Son
Updated:

@Crumbly Writer

Don't forget that the Earth's rotation is continually slowing over time


Not quite true. While the Moon does exert a continuous slowing influence on the Earth's rotation, the moon is also moving away from the Earth, so it's influence on the Earth's rotation will diminish over time.

There are also other factors that can at irregular interval's increase the earth's rate of rotation.

Large scale geological events can slightly alter the Earth's rate of rotation in either direction.

Near misses by astronomical bodies can also increase (or decrease) the earth's rate of rotation.

The other major factor is water. A figure skater in a spin can increase their rate of rotation by pulling their arms in or slowing it by extending their arms out. The skater's mass and energy don't change, but the change in the distribution of mass forces the rate of rotation to change in order to keep the angular momentum the same.

Water does the same thing to the Earth, especially in the current geological age punctuated by fluctuations between ice-ages and inter-glacial periods.

During an ice age, ice accumulates at the poles and sub polar high latitudes, this shifts the mass of the Earth away from the equator and towards the poles and the rotational axis. This increases the rate of rotation.

During the inter-glacial periods, ice melts and liquid water flows towards the equator, slowing the rate of rotation.

PotomacBob

@Banadin

Doesn't that mean that George Washington wasn't born on Washington's birthday.

Replies:   awnlee jawking
awnlee jawking

@PotomacBob

Doesn't that mean that George Washington wasn't born on Washington's birthday.


Jesus wasn't born on Jesus's birthday ;)

AJ

richardshagrin

I have been told the Queen of England selects a day later in the year where the weather is better to have a party to celebrate it.

Wikipedia:

"The Queen's Official Birthday, or the King's Official Birthday, is the selected day in some Commonwealth realms on which the birthday of the monarch (currently Elizabeth II) is officially celebrated in those countries.

The sovereign's birthday was first officially marked in the United Kingdom in 1748, for King George II. Since then, the date of the king or queen's birthday has been determined throughout the British Empire, and later the Commonwealth of Nations, either by royal proclamations issued by the sovereign or governor or by statute laws passed by the local parliament. The date of the celebration today varies as adopted by each country and is generally set around the end of May or start of June, to coincide with a higher probability of fine weather in the Northern Hemisphere for outdoor ceremonies, rather than with the monarch's actual birthday, that of the present monarch being 21 April.[1] In some cases, it is an official public holiday, sometimes aligning with the celebration of other events. Most Commonwealth realms release a Queen's Birthday Honours list at this time."

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