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Military Setting: Parent NCO - Offspring Officer

anja

That's a plot bunny, that is bouncing around my head for some time:

NCO has (estranged?) child, who's joining as well, but as officer (or being promoted). Then they meet in a professional setting.

This can be used from a funny side scene to the main plot were these two are forced to work together.

Setting: past, present, future, every service and nation.

Everyone can use this, but if you do, please let me know.

Replies:   Not_a_ID
Not_a_ID

@anja

NCO has (estranged?) child, who's joining as well, but as officer (or being promoted). Then they meet in a professional setting.


It happens more than you'd think, although they generally make an effort to ensure they do not end up in the same command, nevermind same chain of command, at least not without the knowledge and consent of both involved.

StarFleet Carl

That was actually part of the background in the movie, "An Officer and a Gentleman". Richard Gere was going to OCS to become an Ensign, while his dad, Robert Loggia, was a Chief Petty Officer who hated officers.

If you're reading this and confused due to the hating officers thing, note that Chief Petty Officer is a Navy ENLISTED rank (E-7), same as a Sergeant First Class in the Army, a Master Sergeant in the Air Force, and a Gunnery (Gunny) Sergeant in the Marines.

Replies:   Not_a_ID
Not_a_ID
Updated:

@StarFleet Carl


That was actually part of the background in the movie, "An Officer and a Gentleman". Richard Gere was going to OCS to become an Ensign, while his dad, Robert Loggia, was a Chief Petty Officer who hated officers.


Although in reality that "officer hate" is more act than reality, but it continues because the JO's pretty much NEED to be "smacked around" once they get into the normal military.

The respect their rank commands is earned, not freely given. Yes, those gold bars mean enlisted have to follow their orders, but that doesn't make them gods. That piece of paper doesn't mean shit compared to the practical experience of the senior NCO's who get to walk the tight-rope of being both a mentor, and a subordinate at the same time.

In the "modern military" that piece of paper(College Degree) means even less because having a 4 year degree is practically required in order to advance to E7 or beyond anymore.

Any more, the difference between Senior Enlisted and Junior Officers is about 10 years of military experience(and the degree the NCO holds is very likely to be work related, while the Officer's degree could be in literally anything), and one holds a Commission while the other doesn't. But that's a very "recent"(Bush(43) Administration) development, so the longer-term consequences of that have yet to truly play out.

AmigaClone

@Not_a_ID

Although in reality that "officer hate" is more act than reality, but it continues because the JO's pretty much NEED to be "smacked around" once they get into the normal military.


I have heard anecdotes that the number one cause of death among junior officers during the Vietnam War was them not listening to their senior NCOs.

Replies:   Not_a_ID  Jim S
Not_a_ID
Updated:

@AmigaClone


I have heard anecdotes that the number one cause of death among junior officers during the Vietnam War was them not listening to their senior NCOs.


As have I, but the Vietnam Era military is a very different thing from its present day iteration across the entire board. All-volunteer vs draftee force just being the tip of the proverbial iceberg.

That said, Junior Officers serving with front-line troops that fail to listen to Senior NCO's who have experience "in the field" the JO doesn't get what's coming for them.

Of course, as the recent Ken Burns documentary also obtains acknowledgement of from the Vietnamese... They did have a targeting preference, and they would go for the senior-most person they could target and work their way down from there.

So if Mr. "I am God" JO wants to ignore the advice of his NCOs and make "his seniority evident" the Vietcong were more than happy to acknowledge it.

Jim S

@AmigaClone

I have heard anecdotes that the number one cause of death among junior officers during the Vietnam War was them not listening to their senior NCOs.

That has been true for every war we've ever fought, not only Vietnam. And is probably true in any military. Any JG officer that doesn't rely on his Top Sargeant is a fool and if in combat, very likely a casualty. Unfortunately, he otten ends up getting his men killed too.

StarFleet Carl

@Not_a_ID

The respect their rank commands is earned, not freely given.


Remember that line from Band of Brothers? We salute the rank, not the man.

Except in a combat zone, unless of course you wanted the officer to get shot. Which in some cases wasn't a bad idea.

I know that's one of the things my brother-in-law has going for him. He's now an 0-3 (Lieutenant, Navy - as opposed to Captain in any OTHER branch) and is his company commander. But he also has more than 10 years experience as enlisted - and his college degree is VERY closely related to what he does in the Navy.

Replies:   AmigaClone
AmigaClone

@StarFleet Carl

He's now an 0-3 ...

But he also has more than 10 years experience as enlisted

The experience as enlisted that Mustang Officers like your brother-in-law have is acknowledged by the DoD with junior officers (O-1 to O-3) with more than four years as enlisted getting a higher salary than those without that experience.
Mustang Officers as a group in general are an exception to the rule

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