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Stories removed from site?

cntrlfrk

Is there a way to search stories that have been permanently removed from the site? Either archived or deleted by the author?

-J

itsmehonest

@cntrlfrk

I've found several that also post or can be found ASSM or iiterotica, I have had some luck in the past

Lazeez Jiddan (Webmaster)

@cntrlfrk

In the Library, in the left column, click on 'Removed' to view the last 100 stories that has been removed from SOL.

Replies:   Not_a_ID  bubbag  Vlad_Inhaler
Not_a_ID

@Lazeez Jiddan (Webmaster)

In the Library, in the left column, click on 'Removed' to view the last 100 stories that has been removed from SOL.


Doesn't help when you're looking for what would be the 101st entry on that list. 😱

Replies:   AmigaClone
bubbag

@Lazeez Jiddan (Webmaster)

I'm curious: I see stories removed for "Inappropriate content". On a site like this, what could possibly be
inappropriate content"?

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son

@bubbag

I'm curious: I see stories removed for "Inappropriate content". On a site like this, what could possibly be
inappropriate content"?


http://storiesonline.net/author/posting_guidelines.php

1. You are the creator/co-creator of the work or you have explicit written permission from its author to post the work online. OR Submission is in the public domain (copyright has expired - which you may be asked to prove.)

6. Teasers and blackmail are absolutely prohibited. (Teasers are any story parts that require or entice readers to read preceding or following parts on other sites or purchase those parts or sending money for further postings.)

7. Age restrictions: Your work (stories, poems or blog entries) may not contain characters younger than 14 having sex or being in sexual situations (masturbation and nudism are not allowed). In other words, all characters that engage in any sexual activity must be 14 or older. (Stories posted before September 2011 are not subject to this rule, including new chapters to stories that were in-progress when this rule came into effect.)

8. Illustrated stories must not contain nude photographs. Photographs depicting nude people will be rejected. Illustrations including nudity may be accepted. You must have explicit permission to use the artwork. (You assume the responsibility of using the pictures)
Illustrations are handled at the discretion of the moderator. Pictures maybe shrunk or converted into another format to bring the file size down (our bandwidth is limited). Usually pictures are shrunk to below 400 pixel in any dimension, or kept to a size below 20 KB. And if the pictures don't add any value to the story, they may be deleted completely from the submission.

AmigaClone

@Not_a_ID


Doesn't help when you're looking for what would be the 101st entry on that list. 😱


I recall one time that an author with over 300 stories had them all removed - most of the stories removed that day were only on the list for a few minutes (seconds?) at best.

Vlad_Inhaler

@Lazeez Jiddan (Webmaster)

In the Library, in the left column, click on 'Removed' to view the last 100 stories that has been removed from SOL.

So Silverhawk has removed all of his stories and then himself from this site. I had only read five of his but had liked them.

docholladay
Updated:

I don't know if it would be possible. But how about instead of a list of only stories that are removed instead have it list the authors with the number of their stories removed. Then naming only the stories where the writer still has more stories available on SOL.

edited to better phrase: Authors with the number of stories should be: Authors with the word all stories.
The word all would better display a writer who has left SOL.

Switch Blayde
Updated:

From a marketing perspective, stories removed from the site, other than those removed by Lazeez for inappropriate content, is not a message he wants to send. Archived to Premier is one thing. But to advertise that authors are leaving SOL or removing their stories is not a good message.

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son

@Switch Blayde

But to advertise that authors are leaving SOL or removing their stories is not a good message.


In many, if not most cases, it's because they have come to regret ever having written erotic stories, for reasons wholly external to SOL, and are trying to make them disappear from the entire net, not just SOL.

I'm not sure I can agree that damages the site. But then I don't run the site and it's not my decision, so my opinion isn't worth all that much.

docholladay

Its just an idea of grouping multiple stories by the same writer. Heck it can be just a number of stories. The only reason I had that idea was the possibility of a writer having several stories removed at the same time and dominating the removal lists maximum number. For example if a writer (regardless of reason) has more than a certain number of stories removed at one time, then give the number of stories instead of listing each story.

sunkuwan

Or the author takes the story down because he publishes it.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
docholladay

Or where you can click on the author's name and pull up a list of their stories that are removed. Of course I have no way of knowing what is really possible or practical. But sometimes a dumb idea leads to an answer.

Lazeez Jiddan (Webmaster)

@docholladay

The system for deleted stories is simple. I created it so that if somebody follows an old link to a story that's been deleted can tell what happened. So I have a simple table in the database with the story's ID number, title, author name, and date of removal.

This table was never meant to be used by regular readers. I only added access to it on a whim.

I could possibly add more details, but it's not exactly something that's truly useful. It's one of those things that are only good for 'where did that story go'. Whether you really know why the story was deleted or not, the fact remains that you have no access to it.

The way I see it, any more work I put in this kind of feature is a waste of my time for no real benefit.

Replies:   docholladay  sejintenej
docholladay

@Lazeez Jiddan (Webmaster)

Understood, I was only looking at the options. I did not want to suggest more work to be done by you.

I will state that I am very grateful for all the hard work you put into making this one of the best sites I have found for readers.

i4pepsi2

Ditto

sejintenej

@Lazeez Jiddan (Webmaster)

I could possibly add more details, but it's not exactly something that's truly useful. It's one of those things that are only good for 'where did that story go'

Sensible that way. IF you were to indicate that you had forced the removal/deleted a story you would run the risk of the author suing you for defamation of character. This way any forced removal is mixed in with authors' requests for removal so nobody knows the reason in any case.

Replies:   Vlad_Inhaler
Vlad_Inhaler

@sejintenej

Except the recent ones in the list mentioned earlier.

Crumbly Writer

@sunkuwan

Or the author takes the story down because he publishes it.

Or, more often he takes them down because he wants to publish them, and has a 'letter of intent', only several years go by, nothing comes out, and he eventually does something else. There aren't many SOL/porn authors who have gone on to have successful publishing careers with traditional publishers, even when they stories aren't porn related (ex: "I Won a Spaceship", which I believe was eventually self-published after drifting in the nether for years).

Replies:   sunkuwan
sunkuwan

@Crumbly Writer

Deja Vu ascendency is in limbo for years, he wanted to publish it since forever.

Replies:   Ernest Bywater
Ernest Bywater

@sunkuwan

He had health issues for a few years while working on the edit to have it published. The last I heard he'd editing it to be much better, but couldn't find an agent who was interested in it, and all of the main stream publishers he communicated with told him to go through an agent. He's now working on an even better edit version since his writing style has improved due to the previous edit work, then he'll try the agents again. That was in Aug 2017 when I last communicated with Ascending Author.

Replies:   Switch Blayde
Switch Blayde

@Ernest Bywater

couldn't find an agent who was interested in it, and all of the main stream publishers he communicated with told him to go through an agent.


Going the traditional publishing route is a completely different ballgame. I tried it with my YA novel and gave up almost immediately. It took one agent over half a year to respond (it was already self-published by then). Most never do. You need to send out hundreds or thousands of queries in batches of 10. I sent out a total of 4 (batches of 1) and got frustrated and quit.

And then if you find an agent willing to represent you, they have to sell it to a publisher. And then the real frustrating part begins. The publisher will want changes made. Actually, that's the good part. The changes will most likely make it better. But the process is soooo slooooow. Once it's ready, it will take a year before it's on bookstore shelves.

There's more, but it's all discouraging.

Replies:   Ernest Bywater
Ernest Bywater

@Switch Blayde

There's more, but it's all discouraging.


That's what AA is finding, but he wants the experience. Damned i f I know why.

Replies:   Switch Blayde
Switch Blayde

@Ernest Bywater

That's what AA is finding, but he wants the experience. Damned i f I know why.


I know why. If you get a publishing deal with a traditional publisher (not the small ones, but one of the Big-5 or even a medium size one), it's confirmation that what you wrote is good. If you don't get a deal, it doesn't mean it's not good, but the validation of getting a traditional publishing contract is something. That's what I was after, plus working with one of their developmental editors.

Crumbly Writer
Updated:

As I've stated before, the only reason I never tried is that I don't write the types of stories that traditional publishers are interested in, thus I'd expect them (after several years of submission) to simply flatly reject my stories out of hand.

I write the stories that need to be written, not the type that traditional publishers are currently trying to push. You don't choose that option to become a financial or literary success, but simply because you're driven by the stories themselves.

However, since most high-school and college teachers/professors have somewhat established links to the publishing industry, most 'young authors' fresh out of school have that sense of independence beaten out of them by the time they graduate, so they focus exclusively on the types of material the TP are eager for.

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