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Do you use Speech-to-Text software?

doctor_wing_nut

We've all seen examples of technically poor writing here, and at other sites as well, I'm sure. After watching a few Youtube videos where the poster obviously used a text-to-speech program (often to hilarious or bewildering effect) I began to wonder if the reverse was true. It might help explain some of the spectacular errors I've come across. I also wonder if it might actually HELP the typing-challenged among us produce legible work.

I have never used any such program, so I don't know how they handle punctuation or caps, and I have no idea how effective they are, so I thought I'd ask the class.

It's clear we have some intriguing storytellers here who have difficulty putting thoughts down in a readable format. If there are tools available to assist those that are unable or unwilling to deal with the act of typing, I for one would like to know.

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son

@doctor_wing_nut

I've used Dragon Speaking Naturally. Once trained properly, it's reasonably effective, particularly if your ability to type is limited.

The main period when I used it was after I broke my arm and couldn't use my right hand to type with for a couple of months.

On the other hand, with the use of both hands, I can type faster and more accurately than Dragon Speaking Naturally.

It might work for someone who is really bad at spelling generally, but it can have the same problem with wrong word usage (to/too/two) as a human.

StarFleet Carl

Didn't we have this discussion not that long ago?

But the problem exists even with speech to text software is that editing is still required. And I'm like Dom - with both hoands, I can type considerably faster and more accurately than software is. I sometimes find it easier to simply erase a sentence because I spot an error early on in the sentence and then retype the whole thing rather than move my fingers from the keyboard to the mouse.

Replies:   Grant
Grant
Updated:

@StarFleet Carl

I sometimes find it easier to simply erase a sentence because I spot an error early on in the sentence and then retype the whole thing rather than move my fingers from the keyboard to the mouse.


I'd have thought the actions required to delete the whole sentence would be close to par with moving the cursor to the error then back to the end again.
I agree that using a mouse instead of keyboard shortcuts to move around & select text etc is slower in most cases.

aubie56

I tried Dragon Speaking, but found that I could type faster. Also, it was a nuisance to correct the many errors caused by my Southern accent.

Replies:   Grant  Dominions Son
Grant

@aubie56

Also, it was a nuisance to correct the many errors caused by my Southern accent.

Was that after training it (and you?)

It's been years since I've kept up with such things, but in the past it generally had a about a 50-60% accuracy rating when first installed (and that was a version specifically for Australia). After the training period was frequently around 95% or better.

Dominions Son

@aubie56

Also, it was a nuisance to correct the many errors caused by my Southern accent.


The software has to be trained for your specific voice. If you went through the training properly, the accent shouldn't have been an issue.

Replies:   douglurie
Dominions Son

@Grant

I agree that using a mouse instead of keyboard shortcuts to move around & select text etc is slower in most cases.


I have relatively short fingers. While it's not a problem for normal typing, I can't reach keys like control, backspace, delete, or the arrow keys to move the cursor by keyboard without taking at least one hand off the home row anyway, so for me the mouse is not slower.

douglurie

@Dominions Son

Yeah, I went through the training routine. The biggest problem was with semi-homonyms—things like "wood" being typed when I meant "would." I finally gave up the whole thing in disgust.

StarFleet Carl

@Grant

I'd have thought the actions required to delete the whole sentence would be close to par with moving the cursor to the error then back to the end again.


My keyboard is on a shelf below my desktop, the mouse is on the desktop. Simply reach up with right little finger, hit the backspace key, erase everything, then continue typing, or actually move the entire right hand, take mouse, highlight error, correct error, then move right hand back down again.

48 years ago I taught myself to type this way: Left thumb on the space bar, left middle finger on the shift key for caps, right index and middle finger doing all the typing for the letters and to do the carriage returns is how I first started typing. Finally got to truly learn touch typing in high school about 7 years later, been doing that since then ... so, 41 years of using a keyboard. I'm slowing down a bit as I get older, but I can still hit about 55-60 wpm.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@StarFleet Carl

Finally got to truly learn touch typing in high school about 7 years later, been doing that since then ... so, 41 years of using a keyboard. I'm slowing down a bit as I get older, but I can still hit about 55-60 wpm.

I guess that's why my answers are always so verbose. The last time I was timed, about 15 years ago, before I started writing continually, I was clocked at 200+ wpm (much slower than when I was working in computers and coding that fast. At that speed, you can dump a LOT of words, but editing them all takes MUCH longer than a few spare quips. 'D

Sometimes speed can be it's own handicap, but I never regretted learning how to type in a high-school typing class using electronic typewriters (before they'd even invented the 'white out' typewriter ribbons).

PotomacBob

@Crumbly Writer

I was clocked at 200+ wpm


I believe the world record is not much more than that

Replies:   BlacKnight
BlacKnight

@PotomacBob

I believe the world record is not much more than that


"The fastest typing speed on an alphanumeric keyboard, 216 words in one minute, was achieved by Stella Pajunas in 1946 on an IBM electric. (Her speed over an entire hour was 140 WPM.) As of 2005, writer Barbara Blackburn was the fastest alphanumerical English language typist in the world, according to The Guinness Book of World Records. Using the Dvorak Simplified Keyboard, she maintained 150 wpm for 50 minutes, and 170 wpm for shorter periods. Her top speed was 212 wpm."

StarFleet Carl

@Crumbly Writer

The last time I was timed, about 15 years ago, before I started writing continually, I was clocked at 200+ wpm (much slower than when I was working in computers and coding that fast.


For a brief period, I did a data entry job. 8 hours a day, with my speed at 25,000 keystrokes per hour (which is a consistent 100 wpm when converted to typing) got old really fast. (That also made most of the women at the office mad, because they were experienced and couldn't go as fast as I could. But I got bored too quickly doing it, and it didn't pay enough, either.)

Two carpal tunnel surgeries from later working on an assembly line pretty much put paid to that speed.

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