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My reading Queue just keeps getting longer...

karactr

My reading Queue just keeps getting longer, but I find myself going back and rereading favorites that I just can't seem to put down. Does anyone else have this problem? Or is it only me?

Vulgus's Middlebury, oyster50's start with Cindy, Lubrican's EVERYTHING (sorry, started with him as Beating Off Bob), Marsh Alien's "Gigolo", rache with her eccentric humor that few seem to get and there will never be another like her, Tom Bombadill--where did he go?--

Does anyone have any advice for getting past this hurdle, or am I just doomed to an ever increasing queue while I relive the past?

helmut_meukel

@karactr

My reading Queue just keeps getting longer, but I find myself going back and rereading favorites that I just can't seem to put down. Does anyone else have this problem?


I do, too.

HM.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Ernest Bywater
Updated:

@karactr


Does anyone have any advice for getting past this hurdle,


read faster - it works for me.

Replies:   karactr
karactr

@Ernest Bywater

Hell, I read "Six Times a Day" in 2 weeks and I work 84 hours a week!! How much faster should I read?

Replies:   Ernest Bywater
robberhands

@karactr

My reading Queue just keeps getting longer, but I find myself going back and rereading favorites that I just can't seem to put down. Does anyone else have this problem? Or is it only me?

It isn't that bad for me, or maybe it's worse. The list of stories I repeat reading got longer over the years but my reading queue is disappointingly short.

Ernest Bywater

@karactr

How much faster should I read?


fast enough you could've had some sleep in there as well as some food.

Lapi

@karactr

I think you are not alone. I do the same thing. Some stories are just so well done not many new ones might compare.

It's like having a chip, you can't just stop at one.

Ernest Bywater

@Lapi

It's like having a chip, you can't just stop at one.


"Chippies," the Gobbledok declared - watch out for him!

docholladay

@karactr

My reading Queue just keeps getting longer, but I find myself going back and rereading favorites that I just can't seem to put down. Does anyone else have this problem? Or is it only me?


Nope I have been a long time member of that little club. My bookmarked list of writers keeps on growing every time I find something interesting. Then it has to wait until hopefully I can find the time to read it. Not to mention all of the ones I just keep rereading for some reason. And who can keep count of all those stories, both the finished and the unfinished ones.

Crumbly Writer

@helmut_meukel

I do, too.

It seems to be a common situation. My readers commonly mention having read my stories five or six times (over a period of several years), waiting for my newest stories.

That's why 'Personal favorites' are so useful. If you find an author you particularly like, try checking out the author's personal favorite stories. They'll likely focus on similar stories that feature many of the topics and writing styles you like in those authors. However, they're rarely kept up to date. New authors prepare fairly extensive lists, while established authors rarely add new items.

Crumbly Writer

@Lapi

It's like having a chip, you can't just stop at one.

What's more, often, good books are worth reading multiple times. The first time, you'll stick to the basic plot details, remembering most of the characters, but with a 2nd or 3rd reading, you'll begin to appreciate the story nuances you never even noticed the first time. Plus, as you age and go through different periods, the same story will hit you on completely different levels and you'll see things in the story you hadn't noticed before.

That's why a well-told story never gets tiring, whereas a 'quick and dirty' adventure starts getting boring mid-way through the first reading.

Jim S
Updated:

@karactr


My reading Queue just keeps getting longer, but I find myself going back and rereading favorites that I just can't seem to put down. Does anyone else have this problem? Or is it only me?


I think this is common. Apparently, given comments so far, so do a lot of others.

I've never considered rereading a vice. I think you can keep getting more out of a story each time it's read. I know that happened with me when I first discovered Robert Heinlein in high school. I read every book of his in our school library at least six times by the time I graduated. And in each book, I found something new each time I read it. Maybe I'm a bad reader (to miss so much when reading) but it is what it is, I guess.

Same thing here. Lost count of the number of times favorite Lubrican stories have passed under my eyes. Same thing for the other really good authors here -- Argon, Refusenik, Jan Cantrell, Al Steiner, Lazlo Zalezec, qhml1, Colin Barrett (recently) and others. The "Favorite Authors" feature in My Library gets one helluva workout.

If an author is good, rereading is just a joy. Like listening to a favorite song over and over again.

Replies:   helmut_meukel
helmut_meukel

@Jim S

If an author is good, rereading is just a joy.


Right.
However, no book is without errors. Even with major publishing houses the error rate increased over the last forty years. With dead tree editions I'm stuck with these errors. With ebooks those errors could be fixed and a purchase or re-download three years later shouldn't contain errors found during these 3 years. To my knowledge this isn't done by the big houses.

So I do it myself. When I start rereading a book, I load it into calibre's editor and read it there. Any error I encounter is then easily fixed. Finally I store the file and replace the original files on PC and ebook-reader with it.

When rereading the book the next time I'll find fewer errors. ;)

HM.

Replies:   Ernest Bywater
sunkuwan

There are some really good stories that are a treat to reread.

For me there are two main reasons to reread a story instead of reading a new one:

1. Experiencing the story again. After several years, I want to reread good stories. I currently have read the "Dune" Saga every 8 to 10 years and "Nights Dawn Trilogy" every 5 to 6. But I don't know if I read Nights Dawn sometime soon in the future, I already skipped nearly half the chapters of uninteresting POV's in the last reread. Instead, I will reread the Commonwealth Saga from the author the first time.

2. to get the emotional response from the story, that I am currently looking for.
"Hyperion" is one of the few (or maybe the only one) stories, where the impact of a very emotional story point didn't lessen on the reread. (I'll only say "later Alligator", don't want to spoiler)

karactr
Updated:

I didn't think I was the only one with this nasty addiction...lol. At least it's not fattening.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@karactr

I didn't think I was the only one with this nasty addiction...lol. At least it's not fattening.

Not only that, but rereading books you already have on your shelf is cheaper than buying new books too (a point which doesn't impact stores read on SOL, of course).

Ernest Bywater

@helmut_meukel

To my knowledge this isn't done by the big houses.


True, but I send Lazeez crazy with all my reposts to fix errors and doing revisions to my stories. I post the revised versions on Lulu as well, so those who buy the latest version have less errors to read, and any who have an earlier version who can prove that to me is welcome to a free copy of the latest version.

StarFleet Carl

@karactr

My reading Queue just keeps getting longer, but I find myself going back and rereading favorites that I just can't seem to put down. Does anyone else have this problem? Or is it only me?


Been doing it with dead tree a long time. That may be why I still have a box of books with paperbacks, some of which I purchased while I was in junior high school.

Which, by the way, was in 1975.

One of the ways I've figured out how to deal with the non-dead tree works (aka stuff on here) is through my iPad. Download the kindle version, then store locally.

karactr

The real sad part is having to go back and reread earlier chapters in ongoing serials because you can't remember where things were when you left off.

I need someone to pay me NOT to go to work so I can just spend all my time reading. :)

Replies:   robberhands  docholladay  Jim S
robberhands

@karactr

I need someone to pay me NOT to go to work so I can just spend all my time reading. :)

I wouldn't mind that either, but at least a few people have to keep on writing the stories we want to read.

docholladay

@karactr

I need someone to pay me NOT to go to work so I can just spend all my time reading.


Having the time doesn't really help. I draw a total disability pension besides being over the retirement age. It just helps to keep a person mentally active by reading while depending on the income level(mine is only around 700) other activities are very limited.

Jim S
Updated:

@karactr


I need someone to pay me NOT to go to work so I can just spend all my time reading. :)


Believe me when I say that the above is one of the truly great reasons for being retired. :) Other than keeping your sanity and health.

LonelyDad

I graduated high school in 72, long before there was anything but dead tree and a few audiobooks. I went through my small home town library (one room - about the size of a large living room) like a vacuum cleaner. Somehow they had the complete set of Tom Swift, Jr. books, all of which I read of course. The sad thing is that about 15 years later, after I was married, I was showing my wife the library, and went to see who else had read those books. No one else had. It made me sad to thing that the library spend so much of their obviously limited budget on that set and no one benefited but me. Later on in life I discovered used paperback stores. My favorite ran a '2 for 1', bring in two paperbacks and get one free. Otherwise they were like a quarter. Kept me going through some tough times when there wasn't much money available. That's way SOL is a blessing for me, and I gladly pay for a premium membership.

Crumbly Writer

@LonelyDad

Later on in life I discovered used paperback stores. My favorite ran a '2 for 1', bring in two paperbacks and get one free. Otherwise they were like a quarter. Kept me going through some tough times when there wasn't much money available. That's way SOL is a blessing for me, and I gladly pay for a premium membership.

Living in both downtown Chi-town and Manhattan, hawkers would sell best-selling novels with the front cover cut off (books unsold by the publishers dumped on the public for pennies on the dollar (Typically a buck each)). While that tactic has always been controversial (the author makes squat from such sales), I'd often spend time in the various second-hand shops, as they'd carry the best of many classic novels for similar prices to yours.

Joe Long
Updated:

@LonelyDad


I graduated high school in 72, long before there was anything but dead tree and a few audiobooks.


I'm a handful of years younger. I was first exposed to this genre, unwittingly, by my parents who were apparently avid collectors of paperback adult novels. I believe they swapped them with other couples around town. They'd keep a stack on the stairs to the attic as well as beside their bed. As early as 11 or 12 I started in. I was curious why they had so many mother/son stories, and there were a few I read many times. After awhile I just kept the one under my mattress.

docholladay

@LonelyDad

Later on in life I discovered used paperback stores. My favorite ran a '2 for 1', bring in two paperbacks and get one free.


One of my favorite methods of obtaining new books. Although most of them got smart. They still did the swapping but usually also charged a small cash fee per book. The stores had to make enough money to pay the bills and give the store owners an income. Most of those fees were around 25 cents per book. Also it was possible to purchase the books instead for about half the cover price.

JohnBobMead

I have two rooms absolutely crammed with books, almost all of which have to go away when I move. 30 years of SF/F magazines. Started hitting the used book stores in 1972, I think. Still have some books my sister got via the Scholastic Book Service, back when Scholastic made their money selling paperbacks to kids via the schools. I'm now focusing on eBooks, they take little space and can be read offline. Haven't actually purchased an eReader, use software on my desktop. My memory is poor, so rereading has always been something I do.

Replies:   NC-Retired
NC-Retired

@JohnBobMead

I 'retired' (laid off) in 2012 and was extremely fortunate to get out of my mortgaged house with a profit! But I too had hundreds of books that I needed to dispose of. I took the time to look up the ISBN on Amazon to determine if they were worth the hassle of selling or not. Turned out that I had about $4k in less than 100 books - the rest? Went to half-priced books at $3-$7 a box full. So... if you have a room full I strongly recommend checking their values before doing anything else.

LonelyDad

One of the things I did after getting laid off after 9/11 and not being able to get a job in my field (IT), was managing the paperback racks at chain stores. Putting up new books, restocking good sellers, and removing the ones that were yellowed because the UV from the lights turned the cheap paper brown. Those we tore the covers off and threw in the trash, returning only the covers for cash. Selling a book without its cover is a copyright violation as well as theft from the publisher, and through them the author. With some chains I actually had to have the store management witness my throwing them in the dumpster, or let them do it for me, just to keep that from happening.

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