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Posting before editing. Trying again

Ross at Play
Updated:

My apologies to oldegrump. I may have scared people away from that thread, and it had asked a reasonable question which warrants further discussion.
This is a copy of the relevant posts from the first thread.

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oldegrump

Good Morning; I am in a dilemma. I have some stories at my editors, and other stories that are finished. My problem is I can not seem to stop tweaking them.
I do not seem to tweak the already posted stories.
Should I post the stories before editing and repost the edited versions, or just be patient.
I currently have between 6 and ten stories waiting for edits, and 3 that are in the hands of the editors. I have changed one of the stories that I sent to the editors so much that it is more a version 2 then the same story
Your opinions are greatly needed.

CAT the old grump

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awnlee jawking
@oldegrump


Some writers continue to revise and edit their stories for years - it's an addictive disease like drugs or gambling.
You have to be mentally strong enough to deem that although your story might not be perfect, you've reached the point of diminishing returns: it's ready to go to the editors and you're not going to make any more unsolicited changes before publication.

AJ

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Switch Blayde
@oldegrump


Be patient.
You want to post what you consider your best. After all, your name is on it.
As to tweaking, I know when I'm done when the changes I'm making are insignificant.

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tendertouch
@oldegrump


Best to wait for the edited versions. You'll get the most readers with the story hits the New Stories page and if it obviously needs editing at that point you might well lose readers for good. You can go back and tweak it afterward but you want to have something that's pretty good from the start.

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REP
@oldegrump


Switch said:
I know when I'm done when the changes I'm making are insignificant.
That is the point that you should send the story to your editors. Then set it aside and focus your attention and work on something else. When you get the editors' comments, review them and make any final tweaks you feel are necessary. Then post the story.

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Ernest Bywater
@awnlee jawking


Some writers continue to revise and edit their stories for years - it's an addictive disease like drugs or gambling.
I have a major problem when reading my own stories in that I always see something that can be a little better worded. I recently made a significant decision to finish my current review / revision program and not make any changes after that, except for reported typos. The only exceptions will be A Modern Day Witch Hunt and the Fiction Writing Style Guide, as they will change as more information is made available for them. All but 5 of the Rivers Region stories have been done and locked down.
edit to add: I almost forgot Ed's New Life still has a lot of reported errors to be made to it.

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Ernest Bywater
@tendertouch


You can go back and tweak it afterward but you want to have something that's pretty good from the start.
Which is something I've often done in the past, but what goes up is always edited first, except for Ed's New Life.
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Crumbly Writer

I'm not sure where you expect the new discussion to go, since the last peterred out, but here's my two cents/pence. Once you give something to your editors, you've officially given up on changing/modifying it. Otherwise, there's no point in their doing any work on it if it's not a finished product. Now, authors will continue to make changes, but these should be editor-driven changes, rather than authors pulling the rug out from under their editors. The author chooses how to resolve issues/story conflicts, but they shouldn't go looking for new ways to introduce new errors into their already proofed works!

For me, I typically reach a point with my older stories where I can't make minor edits without feeling compelled to rewrite whole sections. But at that point, you either refuse to correct old typos, or you commit to a complete rewrite. But you can't mangle your previously-edited work on the fly.

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