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You guys are driving me crazy

Switch Blayde

I've been brainwashed. It's "dived" rather than "dove," right?

So what do I do? I just wrote "seeked" (past tense of "seek"). And then I dumbly stared at the red line telling me I had a spelling error.

Of course it's a spelling error. The past tense of "seek" is "sought."

*sighs and shakes head*

awnlee jawking

@Switch Blayde

Google returns 843,000 matches for 'seeked'.

The first page is filled by dictionaries alleging that 'seeked' is incorrect. But on progressing further, it seems 'seeked' can be a valid term in the fields of computers and videos. And then there are the cases where it's a misspelling of 'sought' :(

AJ

Replies:   Ross at Play
Ross at Play

@awnlee jawking

it seems 'seeked' can be a valid term in the fields of computers and videos.

That sounds fine to me. If you have a noun that you press into service as a verb, then you conjugate it regularly.
One of the only exceptions I know of is when you have some headcase attempting to Chanel No.5 you.

Replies:   Dominions Son
Crumbly Writer

@Switch Blayde

I've been brainwashed. It's "dived" rather than "dove," right?

You sure it's not "doved"? 'D

Or is that the past-perfect tense? I always become tense when I'm surrounded by deities from the past.

Switch Blayde

Present, Past, and Future walked into a bar. It was tense.

Replies:   StarFleet Carl
StarFleet Carl

@Switch Blayde

Present, Past, and Future walked into a bar. It was tense.


The bar had been set up in a temporary facility. It was in tents.

richardshagrin

@Switch Blayde

You guys are driving me crazy

Its a short drive.

Replies:   Ernest Bywater
Dominions Son

@Ross at Play

If you have a noun that you press into service as a verb, then you conjugate it regularly.


True, but seek has always been a verb.

Replies:   awnlee jawking
Dominions Son

@Switch Blayde

You guys are driving me crazy


Look me up when you get here, I'll show you around. :)

Replies:   Ernest Bywater
Ernest Bywater
Updated:

@Switch Blayde


Google returns 843,000 matches for 'seeked'.


Wow! there's that many people who get it wrong!

edit to add: odd result I highlighted in AJ's post and it shows as a quote from Switch.

Ernest Bywater

@richardshagrin

Its a short drive.


more like a gravity roll after you let the handbrake off.

Ernest Bywater

@Dominions Son

Look me up when you get here, I'll show you around. :)


I saw you arriving, and have been hiding for years.

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son

@Ernest Bywater

and have been hiding for years.


Not well enough, the voices in Kurt Cobain's head told me where you were.

awnlee jawking

@Dominions Son

No, the two contexts I mentioned have co-opted it as a noun to fill a gap in their jargon.

AJ

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son

@awnlee jawking

No, the two contexts I mentioned have co-opted it as a noun to fill a gap in their jargon.


1. that's still not a noun becoming a verb, its a verb that's already irregular becoming a noun.
2. You are incorrect, yes seeked is a valid term in computers and video, but it is a function/action. That is to say even in those contexts, it is a verb, not a noun. (I am an IT professional)

awnlee jawking

@Dominions Son

I am an IT professional


Appeal to authority? Tsk tsk.

I was wrong about two contexts - they're both about accessing magnetic/optical media.

I've seen 'seek' as a noun in IT contexts eg 'The database is instructed to perform a seek. Depending on the level of indexing, it may have to follow a link to one or more overflow sectors.'

AJ

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son

@awnlee jawking

I've seen 'seek' as a noun in IT contexts eg 'The database is instructed to perform a seek.


Nouns don't have a past tense, so seeked must be a verb usage.

Crumbly Writer

@Dominions Son

1. that's still not a noun becoming a verb, its a verb that's already irregular becoming a noun.

Does that make it a transverbial, or perhaps a 'trans-verb'? Did it know at a very young age that it wasn't really a verb, even though that's what it's grammatical assignment by society said it was?

awnlee jawking

@Dominions Son

Nouns don't have a past tense, so seeked must be a verb usage.


No arguments there. I reckon the people who coined the jargon were keen to avoid using search and searched/sought.

AJ

Replies:   Dominions Son
Crumbly Writer

@Dominions Son

Nouns don't have a past tense, so seeked must be a verb usage.

Then "seeked" must be what the data dripping out of Debbie's mouth is doing, as it's searching for it's own 'happy ending', or in this case, a 'happy opening'. 'D

Dominions Son

@awnlee jawking

No arguments there. I reckon the people who coined the jargon were keen to avoid using search and searched/sought.


It's a bit much to get into the technical differences in this forum, but seek and search are both used in computing and they are not synonyms.

Seeked is used in computing rather than sought for reasons that have nothing to do with the rules for turning verbs into nouns.

1. Modern computing originated in the US and UK, so computing jargon is mostly in English.
2. There are a lot of people in computing for whom English is not their primary language.
3. Computing people in general tend to prefer things to make logical sense. Irregular verb forms don't, so with computing terms, we use regular forms even where the term is irregular in common usage.

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