Preface

Caution: This Romantic Sex Story contains strong sexual content, including Ma/Fa, Ma/ft, Fa/Fa, Consensual, Romantic, Humor, Tear Jerker, DomSub, Group Sex, Harem, Polygamy/Polyamory, Black Male, White Female, First, Oral Sex, Anal Sex, Masturbation, Water Sports, Pregnancy, Exhibitionism, Slow, .

Desc: Romantic Sex Story: Preface - An Australian story about the life of someone who began unwanted and ended up a beloved icon. So don't believe me, neither did his son until he died. I threw in some science fiction critique and some sex to be different

Once a jolly swagman camped by a billabong
Under the shade of a coolibah tree,
And he sang as he watched and waited till his billy boiled:
"You'll come a-waltzing Matilda, with me."

Waltzing Matilda, waltzing Matilda
You'll come a-waltzing Matilda, with me
And he sang as he watched and waited till his billy boiled:
"You'll come a-waltzing Matilda, with me."

Down came a jumbuck to drink at that billabong.
Up jumped the swagman and grabbed him with glee.
And he sang as he shoved that jumbuck in his tucker bag:
"You'll come a-waltzing Matilda, with me."

Waltzing Matilda, waltzing Matilda
"You'll come a-waltzing Matilda, with me",
And he sang as he shoved that jumbuck in his tucker bag:
"You'll come a-waltzing Matilda, with me."

Up rode the squatter, mounted on his thoroughbred.
Down came the troopers, one, two, three.
"Whose that jolly jumbuck you've got in your tucker bag?
You'll come a-waltzing Matilda, with me."

Waltzing Matilda, waltzing Matilda
"You'll come a-Waltzing Matilda, with me"
"Whose that jolly jumbuck you've got in your tucker bag?
You'll come a-waltzing Matilda, with me."

Up jumped the swagman and sprang into the billabong.
"You'll never catch me alive", said he.
And his ghost may be heard as you pass by that billabong:
"You'll come a-waltzing Matilda, with me."

Waltzing Matilda, waltzing Matilda
"You'll come a-waltzing Matilda, with me"
And his ghost may be heard as you pass by that billabong:
"You'll come a-waltzing Matilda, with me."

The lyrics contain many distinctively Australian English words, some now rarely used outside this song. These include:

waltzing

derived from the German term auf der Walz, which means to travel while working as a craftsman and learn new techniques from other masters before returning home after three years and one day, a custom which is still in use today among carpenters.

Matilda:

a romantic term for a swagman's bundle. See below, "Waltzing Matilda."

Waltzing Matilda:

from the above terms, "to waltz Matilda" is to travel with a swag, that is, with all one's belongings on one's back wrapped in a blanket or cloth. The exact origins of the term "Matilda" are disputed; one fanciful derivation states that when swagmen met each other at their gatherings, there were rarely women to dance with. Nonetheless, they enjoyed a dance, and so they danced with their swags, which was given a woman's name. However, this appears to be influenced by the word "waltz", hence the introduction of dancing. It seems more likely that, as a swagman's only companion, the swag came to be personified as a woman.

Another explanation is that the term also derives from German immigrants. German soldiers commonly referred to their greatcoats as "Matilda", supposedly because the coat kept them as warm as a woman would. Early German immigrants who "went on the waltz" would wrap their belongings in their coat, and took to calling it by the same name their soldiers had used.

The National Library of Australia states:

Matilda is an old Teutonic female name meaning "mighty battle maid". This may have informed the use of "Matilda" as a slang term to mean a de facto wife who accompanied a wanderer. In the Australian bush a man's swag was regarded as a sleeping partner, hence his "Matilda". (Letter to Rt. Hon. Sir Winston Churchill, KG from Harry Hastings Pearce, 19 February 1958. Harry Pearce Papers, NLA Manuscript Collection, MS2765)

swagman:

a man who travelled the country looking for work. The swagman's "swag" was a bed roll that bundled his belongings.

billabong:

an oxbow lake (a cut-off river bend) found alongside a meandering river.

coolibah tree

a kind of eucalyptus tree which grows near billabongs.

jumbuck:

a sheep.

billy:

a can for boiling water in, usually 2–3 pints.

Tucker bag:

a bag for carrying food ("tucker").

troopers:

policemen.

squatter:

Australian squatters started as early farmers who raised livestock on land which they did not legally have the right to use; in many cases they later gained legal use of the land even though they did not have full possession, and became wealthy thanks to these large land holdings. The squatter's claim to the land may be as uncertain as the swagman's claim to the jumbuck.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


As the author, barely a writer but definitely a nationalist, of this totally fictional story, I'll add: the old poem and eventual song, which was written in the late 19th century by AB (Andrew Barton) 'Banjo' Paterson, who was a poet and a newspaper man, and made words work, to make what he wrote about sound more romantic to his readers. They were then, like now, predominantly city people. Lord Byron never wrote in English, as she was spoken at the time, or even later, neither did Shelley or Shakespeare, who in his time invented a huge list of words, which were adopted in time into the English language. Some overeducated university graduates, over intellectualise our most important folk song. Some Aussies can get very sentimental over that song.

The expression waltzing down a bush track is no different than someone a few years ago saying let's boogie down to the shop. It's a dated expression now, but we know its root, but in time, that root will be forgotten too, so will that expression unless someone such as the old AB writes it down. Such as Matilda, which more than likely was rhyming slang for the then current accented English, 'my' and a then common female name Tilda or 'my Tilda', which is Matilda as a name abbreviated anyway, Patterson was a poet after all and it can be seen as poetic licence. There is no reason to over intellectualise these things as we, as a population, really aren't all that bright, then or now. Calling a swaggy a worker is really drawing a very long bow and a useful example of an oxymoron. Why do they think he stole that sheep? In the 1890s there was a major depression in this country caused by a shearer's union strike when wool was our, then a British colony's, major export and men went on the road to survive.

Back in the 1960s there were a couple of very small books published. The first one was called Les Stalk Strine, supposedly written by someone called, 'Aferbeck Lauder'. You may have to forgive the spelling, I haven't seen the books for fifty years, but they were simply how Australian English was spoken then, compared to how it was written. See -- Let's Talk Australian by up a bit louder. Even we couldn't understand them to read until we spoke them out loud. Emma Chisit-was-how much is it. The reaction was usually, "Oh, yeah!" the same can be done for every English speaking nation in the world, some books would have to be localised to a few hectares as no one else in the world corrupts their mother tongue that exact same way. At least the same basic accent is used all over Australia, nothing overtly provincial as such. We all talk slowly to Queenslanders who are our version of Texans.

The opinions held in this story are mine, all mine, so don't touch 'em, but I will probably listen to yours with all due respect.

So please read on and I apologise for Chapter nine, as it made me cry too, while both writing it and each later reading.

Chapter 1 »