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Homeless Protagonist

Capt Zapp

I see lots of stories where a rich person finds a single parent in distress and, with the help of the money, things work out for all involved.

I would like to see a story about a homeless single father who meets homeless single mother and they become a family. Money should not be a major factor, by that I mean I don't want them to suddenly come into a major windfall (No winning the big lottery prize, Big inheritance, insurance payout, etc). Minimal or some sex is okay, but definitely would like it to be a romance.

Any takers?

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@Capt Zapp

Not quite what you're looking for, but I'm finishing one where the protagonist, after testifying before Congress, lives among the homeless is public parks across the country to escape the national attention and operate under the radar. His girlfriend supports him, despite the smell of his disguises. (Believe me, it's better than it sounds here.)

However, most stories require a significant event which changes the ordinary into something extraordinary. Aside from meeting and falling in love, there would be little to set one day in a homeless shelter from the next, as the struggle is mostly daily. I'm not sure how one would even go about it.

It would be interesting to read such a story, though, just to see how the author approached it.

Replies:   Capt Zapp
Capt Zapp

@Crumbly Writer

Aside from meeting and falling in love, there would be little to set one day in a homeless shelter from the next, as the struggle is mostly daily.


Part of the struggle for a homeless single parent is how to care for the child while trying to get work. Maybe by them getting together, one of them would be able to find a way to start working and thus get them out of their current state of affairs. As long as the money they get isn't some big unearned lump sum, I have no problems with how they make it, but it would be preferable to be in a legal manner.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@Capt Zapp

Part of the struggle for a homeless single parent is how to care for the child while trying to get work. Maybe by them getting together, one of them would be able to find a way to start working and thus get them out of their current state of affairs. As long as the money they get isn't some big unearned lump sum, I have no problems with how they make it, but it would be preferable to be in a legal manner.

I suspect the 'daily grind' would turn off more readers than it would attract. Again, generally people are drawn to stories that feature an initial change, rather than an eventual change (say a homeless family fleeing criminals, or observing something they shouldn't have).

I'm not saying it can't be done, but I'm just considering what would go into constructing such a story. In my own story, I mostly gloss over what's involved in the homeless aspects of their lives.

Replies:   Capt Zapp
Capt Zapp

@Crumbly Writer

people are drawn to stories that feature an initial change,


Maybe the story could start with one or both of them losing everything and it be about their fight to get back to what they had before and finding love along the way.

Maybe they would have to deal with criminal elements trying to find them or some such. The 'fight for survival'.

It's just an idea but I hope someone will be able to do something with it.

Looking forward to reading your story you mentioned.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer
Updated:

@Capt Zapp

Looking forward to reading your story you mentioned.

Not sure when it'll be released, as I've got several in the pipeline. It's called "Singularity" and is already completed, but I'm hoping to publish/post my "A House in Disarray" first, which isn't (finished yet).

P.S. The idea of two homeless people running from a criminal enterprise is intriguing, especially if it touches on the disparity between the haves and the have-nots, and what some people will go to, to get ahead. I'll have to think about whether I'm qualified to write it, though.

Replies:   richardshagrin
richardshagrin

@Crumbly Writer

I probably should do more research before posting this comment, but it seems to me Bonnie and Clyde, the bank robbers/gangsters from the early 1930s were essentially homeless.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@richardshagrin

I probably should do more research before posting this comment, but it seems to me Bonnie and Clyde, the bank robbers/gangsters from the early 1930s were essentially homeless.

Like you, I'm not sure on this regard, but I doubt it, since they had the money and wherewithal to acquire cars, rapid-fire automatic weapons (in an age when there weren't a lot available). It seems they had plenty of money, but were in it for the thrill. They were only homeless because they were already 'on the run'.

Ernest Bywater

@Crumbly Writer

Like you, I'm not sure on this regard, but I doubt it


Wikipedia is your friend. It says they came from very poor backgrounds, so it's likely they stole the gear.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bonnie_and_Clyde

Dominions Son

@Crumbly Writer

rapid-fire automatic weapons (in an age when there weren't a lot available).


The were considerably more available than you think. Both the Thompson sub-machine gun and the Browning Automatic Rifle The two most common full auto weapons used during the gangster era were invented during WWI and there were significant numbers of military surplus weapons available and as yet, no legal restrictions on civilian ownership of automatic weapons.

koehlerrock

@Crumbly Writer

In regard of the homeless statement, yes; they were essentially homeless and on the run 24/7.
It also depends on what you classify as a home. They used the same car for most of their crimes, so if you classify home as a place to only rest your head, then, no; they were not homeless.

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son

@koehlerrock

It also depends on what you classify as a home. They used the same car for most of their crimes, so if you classify home as a place to only rest your head, then, no; they were not homeless.


That standard is absurd. By that standard, a street person with a box in an alley for a shelter isn't homeless.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@Dominions Son

That standard is absurd. By that standard, a street person with a box in an alley for a shelter isn't homeless.

My point was that they weren't homeless because they couldn't afford rent, but because they were on the run and couldn't 'afford' to stop anywhere (for fear they'd be arrested). I never got the impression they started robbing because they were destitute. (Though I could be mistaken. After all, Faye Dunaway was always nicely dressed in the movies. 'D)

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son

@Crumbly Writer

My point was that they weren't homeless because they couldn't afford rent, but because they were on the run and couldn't 'afford' to stop anywhere (for fear they'd be arrested).


I got your point. It was Koeherrock's point that they weren't homeless at all because if you define "home" as a place to only rest your head, their car qualifies as a home, that's I was responding to.

Replies:   docholladay
docholladay
Updated:

@Dominions Son

It is very possible to use the cop's trained/instinctive reaction to let a person flee. I have taught at least one person in the past how to manage that by changing one particular reaction into another reaction. It worked since the cops were the very ones who notified me of the escape. They looked for the person at the place I was living several states away. I laughed at them after they left even when they kept me and my residence under a periodic watch for several months before giving up. I wonder what they would have thought if they found out they were used to notify me of the escape.

I taught an underage girl how to run away from home and avoid cops even at various check points. She really needed to get away.

edited to add:
I know that in some ways it was illegal as hell, but the statute of limitations has long since expired. Otherwise I would not have given as many details. I knew approximately where she was headed as well at the time and the cops were real suckers for the baited trail.

Dominions Son

@docholladay

It is very possible to use the cop's trained/instinctive reaction to let a person flee.

I have no idea what comment of mine you are replying to.

I rather doubt that such training/instinct exists. There has been a lot of video popping up lately of cops in the US shooting fleeing suspects. The law in many jurisdictions explicitly allows them to shoot fleeing felony suspects.

Replies:   docholladay
docholladay

@Dominions Son

I rather doubt that such training/instinct exists.


Okay when any cop sees someone suddenly changing direction (especially a u turn type action) their reaction is to catch them and find out why (Predator-prey reaction). That reaction can be changed to another one if given the right signs first. In which case the u-turn is ignored. As to the shooting of fleeing felony suspects. I was not fleeing the young 16 year old girl however definitely was however. Legal options in her case had failed the cause had a great rep with local cops so when ever she complained it was ignored. I found the truth in less than 24 hours. Then I took the time to teach her how to run away and setup a deliberate false trail using myself as bait. The cops took the bait, hook, line and sinker. The girl went in an entirely different direction as planned with no direct assistance from me at all outside of the teaching. The cops checked me out big time and couldn't get any reason to investigate me further. I was the bait to lead them in the wrong direction (deliberately). My only other option was to somehow cause the death of the girl's reason for running. I refused to take that step.

Replies:   Ernest Bywater
Ernest Bywater

@docholladay

Okay when any cop sees someone suddenly changing direction (especially a u turn type action) their reaction is to catch them and find out why (Predator-prey reaction).


Having been through this training I can tell you it's true. In the academy they acknowledge you can't give everyone a very detailed examination while on patrol, so they teach you to watch out for incriminating or unusual behaviour and ignore most normal behaviour. Thus, you react to someone who seems to respond badly to seeing your uniform by a sudden change in course etc. But if they simply continue to walk normally and respond without getting notice you quickly drop them and continue scanning the crowd. Most people get nervous when misbehaving and this is what the cops get trained to look for.

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son

@Ernest Bywater

And a lot of people get nervous for reasons having nothing to do with misbehaving.

Replies:   Ernest Bywater
Ernest Bywater

@Dominions Son

And a lot of people get nervous for reasons having nothing to do with misbehaving.


Ayep, which is why you can't assume everyone you see is a crook. You have to watch them and make a judgement decision, often after speaking to them.

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son

@Ernest Bywater

You have to watch them and make a judgement decision, often after speaking to them.


Most US cops seem to skip that step these days.

Replies:   Ernest Bywater
Ernest Bywater

@Dominions Son

Most US cops seem to skip that step these days.


I can that happening in some places.

A real adrenalin rush is when you see someone and call out to them to ask a simple question, and the response you get from, "Hey, I'll like a quick word," is the person spinning around with a gun in their hand. You'd be surprised how that can up your maximum movement speed to a level you've never managed on a track, and never will on a track.

Replies:   Dominions Son  tppm
Dominions Son

@Ernest Bywater

A real adrenalin rush is when you see someone and call out to them to ask a simple question, and the response you get from, "Hey, I'll like a quick word," is the person spinning around with a gun in their hand.


I doubt any cop ever gets that kind of response. A lot of unarmed people have been shot this year, far more than the number of cops that have been shot in the US.

The standard line seems to be "he was reaching for his waistband, I thought he had a gun."

This is complete BS. Why would an unarmed man facing an armed cop with his weapon drawn reach for an empty waistband? The cops just lie and lie and lie.

Ernest Bywater

@Dominions Son

I doubt any cop ever gets that kind of response.


I don't know if many get that response in the USA, but I can tell you it's frightening when it happens to you in a country like Australia where the ownership of handguns is extremely hard to get approved, and most of the approved ones are for people who need them for work and not allowed to take them home. Thus 90% of the ones you see people on the streets are held by criminals.

Ernest Bywater

@Dominions Son

The standard line seems to be "he was reaching for his waistband, I thought he had a gun."


I can see that thinking by some extremely nervous cop, but I've also seen a lot of people reaching for the waistband to pull out a knife or some ID, you never know. I was taught you wait to see what they get, but I don't run the US academies, and way too many of the US cops don't go through an academy.

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son

@Ernest Bywater

but I've also seen a lot of people reaching for the waistband to pull out a knife or some ID, you never know.


The cops in the US keep trotting this line out in cases where the person turned out to be unarmed.

US Cops are being taught by the academies here that they only have a 50/50 chance of surviving any given traffic stop, when the reality is that less then 200 cops/year die in the line of duty nation wide and all but 30-50 of those are the result of traffic accidents.

Replies:   Ernest Bywater
Ernest Bywater

@Dominions Son

The cops in the US keep trotting this line out in cases where the person turned out to be unarmed.


Damn, I thought that was why they used to carry those extra Saturday Night Specials.

As to the academy training, maybe it's because they approach traffic stops as dangerous situations that they don't get so many killed at them now.

Last I heard, many of the US police forces accept prior experience as a cop as suitable training. However, there's also a lot of small forces who accept anyone with an interest and no criminal record as a cop, and that means they can later move on into a larger force without ever getting proper training. I do know some forces, not many, won't accept an applicant unless they're a graduate of an approved police training academy. I wonder if it's possible to break down the stats of police problems by the training sources they had?

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son

@Ernest Bywater

As to the academy training, maybe it's because they approach traffic stops as dangerous situations that they don't get so many killed at them now.


They never got so many of them killed. Besides, it's not just officer deaths that are down, assaults on officers are also at a 50 year low.

Replies:   Ernest Bywater
Ernest Bywater

@Dominions Son

They never got so many of them killed.


When I went through the academy they had film footage of six US police officers shot and killed at traffic stops, and written stories of another dozen - the dates of the incidents were all within the previous 2 years and they were chosen for how safe and routine they looked up until the shooting started. Now, that was some years ago, but they weren't seen as extremely odd events then.

You have to remember when a cop shoots someone it's national headline news, when someone shoots a cop it's rare it gets more than a small paragraph on page five.

As to the statistic over half the crap they keep the statistics on today didn't exist ten years ago, let alone twenty. Also, one of the things the politicians keep doing is breaking the categories up and the levels of violence change so they can make the stats look better for them.

sejintenej

@docholladay

I have taught at least one person in the past how to manage that by changing one particular reaction into another reaction. It worked since the cops were the very ones who notified me of the escape

I have no idea who the wanted man is/was but one day the gendamerie arrived in force in the tiny hamlet where I live. They were seeking a person called Nick Quintin whom at first I had never heard of. A short time after they left I had to get a plaster to cover a cut and there in the medicine cabinet I noticed the anti-smoking patches called Niquintin

Dominions Son

@Ernest Bywater

When I went through the academy they had film footage of six US police officers shot and killed at traffic stops, and written stories of another dozen - the dates of the incidents were all within the previous 2 years and they were chosen for how safe and routine they looked up until the shooting started. Now, that was some years ago, but they weren't seen as extremely odd events then.


That still doesn't back the claim being made. There are millions of traffic stops in the US every year. 9 shootings at traffic stops in one year is 0.001%, four orders of magnitude sort of the 50% claim.

Replies:   Ernest Bywater
Ernest Bywater

@Dominions Son

That still doesn't back the claim being made.


I don't know what the statistics and the claims are in the US, but on safety issues, I can tell you that when you worry about safety in a risk situation there's a damn sight less likelihood of something going wrong than if you don't worry about the safety factors.

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son
Updated:

@Ernest Bywater


I can tell you that when you worry about safety in a risk situation there's a damn sight less likelihood of something going wrong than if you don't worry about the safety factors.


Except when you obsess over negligible safety risks you actually increase the likelihood of something going wrong, like shooting a 80 year old man after you ordered him out of his car because your paranoid brain mistook his cane for a gun.

Cops shooting unarmed drivers at traffic stops over shit like that is way more common than cops getting shot a traffic stops.

tppm
Updated:

@Ernest Bywater


Most US cops seem to skip that step these days.

I can [see] that happening in some places.

A real adrenaline rush is when you see someone and call out to them to ask a simple question, and the response you get from, "Hey, I'll like a quick word," is the person spinning around with a gun in their hand. You'd be surprised how that can up your maximum movement speed to a level you've never managed on a track, and never will on a track.


There you are minding your own business, which may or may not be legitimate, when you hear someone out of eyeshot call out, "Hey, I'd like a quick word." You look around t see where it came from and see a cop looking at you and you panic, thinking "What did I do? Why are the cops interested in me?" If you're a member of a group who perceives themselves as oppressed, accurately or not, increase the panic by at least an order of magnitude.

Then the cop sees the panic and thinks "Why is he reacting so badly, I only wanted to ask directions. He must be up to something."

Cops, by their nature, are intimidating, and some don't seem to realize that.

Replies:   Ernest Bywater
docholladay

My problem is that because of what happened to me over 50 years ago. I lost all TRUST in the cops. I know for a fact I was not the only victim of that g-damned Detective on the Atlanta Police Department. But when he was actually caught and just forced into early retirement instead of being sent to prison. It proved to me that cops could not be trusted in any manner, shape or form. Feared yes but trusted no.

As a result over the years in many situations I took illegal routes to help others in trouble. And I admit I do carry grudges forever. I never forget or forgive a wrong done to me by any one at any time.

I had a friend who one time said he would hate to have me have a grudge since I was the type to walk up to him in a bar 20 years later. Blow his head off and say "Now we are even". I told my friend there would be too many witnesses. Revenge is sweet, but I refuse to hang myself in the process.

Ernest Bywater
Updated:

@tppm


If you're a member of a group who perceives themselves as oppressed, accurately or not, increase the panic by at least an order of magnitude.


It could well be the differences between Australia and the US, but we had a thing we called a Whome Patrol. You see a group who are just hanging around looking a bit suspicious, so you pick one on the edge of the group, there's always one with no one within a few feet of them, and point right at him and say, "I'd like a quick word with you?" It matters not if there's no one within two feet of them or twenty-two feet, they always look to their left, their right, behind them, then tap their chest and ask "Who, me?" When you nod they come over, you quietly ask what they're all up to, get the gen - usually it's something innocent like waiting for Jerry or Joe etc. or killing time until the next movie theatre session. It's how they react while you talk to them that's the main thing you base your judgement on.

What's amazing is when you find out later what they tell their mates you spoke about, it's never what you actually talked about.

In any organisation there are real good ones, real bad ones, mediocre ones, and average ones, and it's just the luck of the draw which one you get on any one day. Thus is the wisdom of an ex-cop who's currently pissed off due to being jerked around by a zealous arse hole of a cop.

typo edit

Replies:   tppm
Ernest Bywater

@docholladay

But when he was actually caught and just forced into early retirement instead of being sent to prison


Doc, I'd bet the reason for that was not the street cops, but the high level political cops not wanting a scandal on their watch. I saw a similar thing when I was in the force. A detective (amazing how 90% of the time the scum are detectives) got caught playing both sides, every uniform cop wanted him public executed for what he did, but the people with all the gold braid and their political bosses didn't want a scandal, so he was allowed to resign. A couple of years later he was in the wrong place during a raid, someone from the group he was in fired at the police, when the dust cleared he was one of the four dead - and they got it all on film too. When the shooting started he pulled a gun and was immediately shot.

Replies:   docholladay
docholladay

@Ernest Bywater

Maybe so Ernest, but there were just too many other cases as I found out that were similar. Including at least one where a young girl about to turn 18, accidentally got a 12gauge stuck in her mouth on a hunting trip and pulled the trigger. It was declared by both the cops and the labs to be an accident. The stepfather was never investigated at all. Nice part was a few years later he had the exact same accident only that time they investigated me up one side and down the other. Perfect alibis and no way I could have any connection to his accident. I did later on keep my word to that little girl. I pissed on his grave.

Replies:   Ernest Bywater
Ernest Bywater

@docholladay

Maybe so Ernest, but there were just too many other cases as I found out that were similar.


Another thing about the US law enforcement is how inconsistent the training is. Every Australian Police Force insists people go through an approved Police Academy before they can be hired for law enforcement activities - some technical specialist don't need the training, but they aren't given a badge or involved in law enforcement, just IDs and tech work. Some of the US forces insist on proper training, but many don't, they just don't have the funds for it. That has to cause issues.

ustourist

@Ernest Bywater

The justice system in the USA, from small towns right up to the top, suffers from the fact that many are amateurs and political appointees rather than professionals.
In my location the former county judge was aunt to the city code compliance officer, the county sheriff and city magistrate are brothers. That has been a historic problem in rural areas and apart from the city officers they are all elected so may have no training prior to appointment - city officers are appointed by those who are elected! You have problems both with lack of training and with nepotism, so issues that may rock the boat are quietly pushed aside and trying to raise them again can bring a shitload of trouble from many directions onto those who ask questions.

tppm
Updated:

@Ernest Bywater

Well, it isn't just U.S. v. Australia, it's L.A. v. anywhere else. I grew up in a suburb of Los Angeles, and still live in the area, and from 1950 (Chief Parker takes office and cleans up the fiscal corruption of the PD) until 1991 (the Christopher Commission issues their report on the Rodney King beating) the LAPD had a stated policy of acting as though they were an occupying army.

docholladay

Too many police and other authorities take the trust factor for granted due to their job. But I think its like all those kids who gave me their trust. It just made me work harder to deserve the trust. Its not something that can be taken for granted.

Crumbly Writer

@Ernest Bywater

You have to remember when a cop shoots someone it's national headline news, when someone shoots a cop it's rare it gets more than a small paragraph on page five.

Sorry, Ernest, but I don't buy that. In the U.S., if someone shoots a cop, every law agency in the country goes on alert, the national media reports it, and a National manhunt ensues with reporters detailing every single lead.

The problem now, is that when a cop shoots a white man, it gets attention, but when they shoot a black man or other minority, no one gives a damn. It's only now that everyone has a phone, that we're learning the majority of the blacks being shot are completely unjustified. Blacks have known it for years. Whites are always much longer to accept the truth.

Crumbly Writer

@docholladay

My problem is that because of what happened to me over 50 years ago. I lost all TRUST in the cops.

I've never trusted cops, and raising two black kids, I saw on a daily basis the reality of how they're treated, and the fact whites never recognize it. Meeting cops in Manhattan proved my worst fears, which is the reason I never hung around them--I was revolted by their mere presence, talking about who they killed or abused that day.

The only difference between 20, 30, 50 or 100 years ago is that now, we have film evidence. If it was up to the police, they'd grab and burn every camera they come across (which is a common technique in many cases).

Crumbly Writer

@Ernest Bywater

Some of the US forces insist on proper training, but many don't, they just don't have the funds for it. That has to cause issues.

I know that the NYPD requires an NYPD Academy degree, which is why they're generally more professional than the average street cop or traffic stop cop.

For about 5 to 7 years, it was standard practice to refuse to allow young black males to drive, because it was assumed, if they were stopped in N.J., they'd be killed. I told my girls, "NEVER let your male friends drive! It's better to be safe than sorry."

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son

@Crumbly Writer

I know that the NYPD requires an NYPD Academy degree, which is why they're generally more professional than the average street cop or traffic stop cop.


NYPD? Professional??

There are 3 or 4 stories from the last few years of the NYPD opening fire on a suspect in shooting half a dozen or more bystanders.

One case in particular that sticks out in my mind:

Half a dozen NYPD officers respond to a drunk pedestrian wondering in and out of traffic. He won't obey their orders (he's too drunk to understand them). So all six officers open fire on one drunk in a busy intersection during rush hour. each officer empties his weapon. 9 bystanders were shot, fortunately none fatally. The real kicker: The number of times they hit the drunk, ZERO.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@Dominions Son

NYPD? Professional??

There are 3 or 4 stories from the last few years of the NYPD opening fire on a suspect in shooting half a dozen or more bystanders.

As I said, I never trust cops. That said, the NYPD is generally better trained than other police forces. However, many graduated from the NYPD Academy twenty years ago. Times change, and some people are just plain scum. When dealing with cops, you're basically dealing with people who like hurting others (many, not all of them).

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son

@Crumbly Writer

That said, the NYPD is generally better trained than other police forces.


If they are so much better trained, how come they can't shoot worth a damn. When the NYPD starts shooting, the safest place to stand is behind their target.

Only one other PD in the US (LAPD, I'm looking at you) has anywhere near as many cases of bystanders accidentally shot by police.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer  tppm
Crumbly Writer

@Dominions Son

If they are so much better trained, how come they can't shoot worth a damn. When the NYPD starts shooting, the safest place to stand is behind their target.

Have you seen the majority of NY Police officers? Most can't run at faster than a trot, and are old enough they're in no rush anywhere. They're just counting the days until they retire. I'm not surprised they couldn't hit the broad side of the barn. I said they were the best trained, not that they're still in functional condition. It's like asking why most parents can't do 5th grade math with their kids, despite the majority attending college.

Besides, given your description, I'd bet most of them had been drinking themselves, but it was covered up by the other cops for fear it would make the city worse than the report of missing someone already did.

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son
Updated:

@Crumbly Writer


Besides, given your description, I'd bet most of them had been drinking themselves, but it was covered up by the other cops for fear it would make the city worse than the report of missing someone already did.


But it's not just that incident. That black immigrant (I can't remember the name, something that started with A) that they shot up years ago in the doorway to the apartment building he was living in. 4 cops emptied guns with 12 round magazines at him (48 rounds total).

I was shocked when they finally made the autopsy report public. 48 rounds down range, they hit him less than a dozen times.

A cop, someone who carries and occasionally has to use a gun as part of his or her job has has no business considering himself a professional if he/she can't shoot better than that.

Cops who exhibit that poor a level of marksmanship should have their weapons taken away from them.

tppm

@Dominions Son

LAPD, I'm looking at you


Also, every officer an Academy graduate. Some of the neighboring PDs take LAPD Academy drop outs and rejects.

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son

@tppm

Also, every officer an Academy graduate.


And their Academy is supposed to be one of the best in the country, but half their graduates couldn't hit the broad side of a barn...from the inside.

Replies:   Capt Zapp
Capt Zapp

@Dominions Son

And their Academy is supposed to be one of the best in the country


Weren't there a series of movies about their Police Academy?

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son

@Capt Zapp


Weren't there a series of movies about their Police Academy?


As far as I remember, those were supposed to be fiction, not documentaries, but now that you mention it....

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