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Crossovers you would live to read?

Tbeartx
Updated:

Ever read a story and thought that one of the characters would fit perfectly into another author's storyline? I have several I can think of that I would enjoy reading about, but I think this is the one I would most like to see attempted if somebody had the urge and permission from the authors.

Dawn from Blue Dragon's Ordinary Teenage/Adult Sex Life series finds her way into working in the porn industry for Five Friends Casting from Jay Cantrell's Daze in the Valley as part of her self exploration phase.

So what is at the top of your crossover wish list?

Tbeartx

I guess my career as an editor was doomed from the beginning. That should be "like" in the title...not "live".

Replies:   REP  Crumbly Writer
REP

@Tbeartx

It happens to us all. Just read our posts and you will see numerous, glaring errors.

Crumbly Writer

@Tbeartx

I guess my career as an editor was doomed from the beginning. That should be "like" in the title...not "live".

Careful, otherwise we may all start inundating you with all our forum posts for editing, and you'll never see the light of day again!

Generally, it's assumed that most forum posts are 'unedited', and thus—except for exceptionally glaring typos—we generally ignore most of them.

hiltonls16

I enjoyed the cameo of Dual Writer's Florida Friends in Ernest Bywater's Runaway (today's chapter).

Replies:   docholladay
sunkuwan

That reminds me, that I have to read the last book of Adult sex life. But I don't find the drive to continue with it. The last college book soured me on the whole series. I really should have quit with the fake dream ending.

Replies:   robberhands
robberhands

@sunkuwan

So what is at the top of your crossover wish list?

I already fulfilled my favorite crossover wish, when I borrowed ElSol's Iane from 'A Master's Ring' for my own story.

docholladay

@hiltonls16

I enjoyed the cameo of Dual Writer's Florida Friends in Ernest Bywater's Runaway (today's chapter).


An excellent example of how it works when one story helps the other with background material. It fills in an empty space in the Florida Friends story line while sticking to their basic character data. Also it keeps Ernest from having to invent characters for his story. Helps both story lines without changing any of the characters.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
AmigaClone

When I think of crossovers, I tend to split them in a few different levels.

1) Cameos - Brief scenes with the elements from another story line in the background. For instance ET in The Phantom Menace, R2D2 in a Star Trek movie. I would also include the MC reading stories in this situation.

2) Brief interaction with characters from another story line like the scenes mentioned above.

3) Significant interaction between the MC of one story line and minor characters in another. Book 3 of Playing the Game series had this type of crossover with the Summer Camp series.

4) Major interaction between the characters in two story lines.

Crumbly Writer

@docholladay

An excellent example of how it works when one story helps the other with background material. It fills in an empty space in the Florida Friends story line while sticking to their basic character data. Also it keeps Ernest from having to invent characters for his story. Helps both story lines without changing any of the characters.

Best of all, from a marketing perspective, it introduces the fans of each author to the author author, and makes them want to read about the other characters. That's a win-win for both authors (if done well, of course).

Replies:   docholladay
docholladay

@Crumbly Writer

Best of all, from a marketing perspective, it introduces the fans of each author to the author author, and makes them want to read about the other characters. That's a win-win for both authors (if done well, of course).


One of the things I like about the Florida Friends stories is the way there are so many potential openings for other writers to take advantage of. All those charter businesses for one example. Very few customers are named for them, but they are extremely busy. The other business operations and developments are also potential openings for cross over links. Who are the customers for all the equipment sold. How about the "wind generators" among other things. Who are the customers who have not been named.
There are who knows how many potential links just from the businesses alone. And why should every writer reinvent a business operation when one or more is available already from another writer.
When its done right it helps both writers and their stories as proven in Ernest's current story.

Crumbly Writer

@docholladay

There are who knows how many potential links just from the businesses alone. And why should every writer reinvent a business operation when one or more is available already from another writer.

Alas, in my case, when part of my stories end up on other worlds and the others involve a post-apocalyptic wasteland, it doesn't do much good to invent a business which other authors can reference. 'D

Replies:   sejintenej
Ernest Bywater

@docholladay

When its done right it helps both writers and their stories as proven in Ernest's current story.


Hey, did you miss the chartered plane in Play Ball - it was an S&S charter.

Replies:   docholladay
docholladay

@Ernest Bywater

Hey, did you miss the chartered plane in Play Ball - it was an S&S charter.


Nope, but that wasn't the story mentioned at this time. I just kept the references to a minimum since it covered what I was talking about. Play Ball is just one story that has mentioned or interacted with the "Florida Friends" stories. You definitely take advantage of the openings created by others in the right way. It helps both in my opinion.

I just hope DW's health is improving but since he doesn't really want a lot of fan mail, I have tried to respect his wishes and not send any mail to him. Might break down and do it if I don't see at least a note on his author's page. I will have to think about it carefully however since I definitely want to respect his wishes.

sejintenej

@Crumbly Writer

Alas, in my case, when part of my stories end up on other worlds and the others involve a post-apocalyptic wasteland, it doesn't do much good to invent a business which other authors can reference.


It is not necessarily others tying in with your stories but you tying in with existing stories just as EB has done (their authors permitting if necessary)

I would have thought that, in first considering a plot you could work a tie in with other stories. Greenies for example has cryogenics, space warfare, commercial scale agriculture and a mass of other scientific, military and social ideas.
Post apocalyptic wasteland still has remaining debris giving at least slight link to other stories or maybe characters from other stories may have survived. .

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@sejintenej

I would have thought that, in first considering a plot you could work a tie in with other stories. Greenies for example has cryogenics, space warfare, commercial scale agriculture and a mass of other scientific, military and social ideas.

Post apocalyptic wasteland still has remaining debris giving at least slight link to other stories or maybe characters from other stories may have survived.

That actually makes sense. I guess I've never looked for leads in. Maybe because I try to make my stories non-date specific (partially so the story doesn't 'age out' into irrevelancy, but also so it'll still be relevant in any time period).

It seems, in many instances, the best sci-fi stories are those that don't occur at a specific time. "1984" was insanely popular until the year 1984 rolled around, at which point it essentially disappeared from store shelves and classrooms across the country.

I'll have to consider how to provide links to other series in my stories. It's definitely worth considering.

Dominions Son
Updated:

@Crumbly Writer


It seems, in many instances, the best sci-fi stories are those that don't occur at a specific time.


Or occur at a very specific time in the distant, as opposed to the near future.

Star Trek has a very specific timeline, but it will be over two hundred years, before it ages out. The time setting for season one of the original series is 2266.

However, anything other than hard science fiction set in the near future is not going to age well.

Geek of Ages

@Crumbly Writer

1984" was insanely popular until the year 1984 rolled around, at which point it essentially disappeared from store shelves and classrooms across the country.


Not true; it's still a very-commonly assigned book in high school or so (I actually got it assigned twice, once in middle school, once in high school). As well, it's sales have gone up over the past months, from an already-tidy baseline.

Good stories that age out of their technology still hold up because of the underlying characters and conflicts. 1984 is one of those.

docholladay

Its why it is best not to give the year as part of the dates. Other factors can also date a story. Certain Political office holders can also date a story. Of course there are other factors which can date a story.

As mentioned however a good story can and will overcome those dating problems among others.

shinerdrinker
Updated:

G Younger and I were in preliminary talks to co-author a story merging his Stupid Boy story with my Mayhem in a Pill story into an ESPN Sponsored game between the two super high school football teams of SOL.

Only problem is I need to get going and get Mayhem and his cohorts up into at least the junior season while I can hopefully get Dawson before he graduates. We might try it anyway. Just a be a one off with both of us switching chapters back and forth.

Also with a little surprise at the end. The idea ain't dead it's just me trying to get further up in my own timeline. It would probably be a short story. Maybe only a few chapters and maybe like a weird parallel universe where it doesn't mess with either storyline.

I'm almost talking myself into it. Or it's just the fact I have been writing about it all night and it's almost noon now.

Ernest Bywater

@shinerdrinker


Only problem is I need to get going and get Mayhem and his cohorts up into at least the junior season while I can hopefully get Dawson before he graduates. We might try it anyway. Just a be a one off with both of us switching chapters back and forth.


It may be a good idea for after they graduate as pro teams or as a special fantasy team conflict game that's out of the regular order.

Ernest Bywater

@shinerdrinker


Only problem is I need to get going and get Mayhem and his cohorts up into at least the junior season while I can hopefully get Dawson before he graduates. We might try it anyway. Just a be a one off with both of us switching chapters back and forth.


It may be a good idea for after they graduate as pro teams or as a special fantasy team conflict game that's out of the regular order.

G Younger

@shinerdrinker

G Younger and I were in preliminary talks to co-author a story merging his Stupid Boy story with my Mayhem in a Pill story into an ESPN Sponsored game between the two super high school football teams of SOL.


The other problem is Dawson and his team would kill them ;-)

I think the key to a good crossover is you need to like the story of the other author. I think that is why Jay Cantrell only crosses over to his own stories.

In Stupid Boy you will see that happen. David will also do a movie where he essential plays another character from a book on SOL. {Hint: Based in Cuba and he meets a Russian Missile team}

sejintenej

@shinerdrinker

G Younger and I were in preliminary talks to co-author a story merging his Stupid Boy story with my Mayhem in a Pill story into an ESPN Sponsored game between the two super high school football teams of SOL

Oyster50 tried to do this with a British unnamed author whereby there would be a visit to 3Sigma. Unfortunately it fizzled out. The initial chapter actually looked very good but .......
It seems to need a lot of commitment and the two authors thinkng in a similar way.

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