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Alien female in love with human male

Zealmark12

Any stories with female aliens in love with human males.I would really love to read some. Recommendations?

ustourist

@Zealmark12

Lost in (Fold) Space - 2 stories - by Tedbiker
My Girls - several stories - by unknown1000u2
and I suppose you could include
Second Time Through by Phil Brown which is also several stories.

awnlee jawking

@Zealmark12

By some considerable coincidence, I've just been doing some research for a story scene in which the alien female and human male work out they're sexually compatible but biologically incompatible.

AJ

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
LonelyDad

Don't forget the Ritual series by ItemReader.

Zealmark12

Thanks, I'll start reading now

Crumbly Writer

@awnlee jawking

By some considerable coincidence, I've just been doing some research for a story scene in which the alien female and human male work out they're sexually compatible but biologically incompatible.

Ha-ha! I'm just finishing off a new story where the characters discover they're incompatible with everyone they've known, and only come to realize that they're really quasi-aliens. The series name is "Not-Quite Human".

Replies:   awnlee jawking
awnlee jawking

@Crumbly Writer

Sounds intriguing.

My shortly-to-be happy couple are working out that his tab A fits her slot B rather nicely, but their DNA is too different for his little swimmers to fertilise her eggs.

AJ

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@awnlee jawking

My shortly-to-be happy couple are working out that his tab A fits her slot B rather nicely, but their DNA is too different for his little swimmers to fertilise her eggs.

In short, it's an especially 'happy ending' for the male protagonist! The premise might not play as well with a largely female audience, though.

Replies:   awnlee jawking
richardshagrin

There is also the male donkey with mare or stallion with female donkey outcome, offspring that are unable to reproduce. Mules are somewhat different, not just in their stubbornness.

Replies:   awnlee jawking
bigeck11

close encounters of the 5th kind by the slutman is a good read but I think its been removed from the site.

awnlee jawking

@richardshagrin

I believe I read recently that male Neanderthal DNA was incompatible with Homo sapiens DNA, so mongrels like myself got their Neanderthal DNA contribution entirely from their women. I think it also said that male Neanderthal DNA didn't have the same association with testosterone production as male Homo sapiens DNA, suggesting that Neanderthals were a peaceful, civilised, artistic species forced into extinction by their more aggressive relatives.

AJ

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
rhprairie

@Zealmark12

I enjoyed the stories in the Dizyntk Imperium Universe by Brian in the Dark
http://storiesonline.net/universe/598/dizyntk-imperium

Crumbly Writer

@awnlee jawking

I think it also said that male Neanderthal DNA didn't have the same association with testosterone production as male Homo sapiens DNA, suggesting that Neanderthals were a peaceful, civilized, artistic species forced into extinction by their more aggressive relatives.

Uh, if no male Neanderthal DNA currently exists in modern humans, then how the hell do they know what effect it has on aggression? It's easy to say, Neanderthals didn't have the same aggression producing systems that we have, but another entirely to say 'they were all sandal wearing hippies'.

Replies:   awnlee jawking
awnlee jawking

@Crumbly Writer

Since they lost the evolutionary battle, I think it's a reasonable assumption that Neanderthals were less aggressive than Homo sapiens. I'm puzzled about the testosterone claim though; I would have thought testosterone production greater than that available to females would be a requirement for even the existence of males.

AJ

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
awnlee jawking

@Crumbly Writer


The premise might not play as well with a largely female audience


If I ever finish the story, I'd better remember not to offer it to Mills & Boone then.

I've done some tinkering with the female's anatomy, and there might be other reasons for female reader dissonance.

AJ

Crumbly Writer

@awnlee jawking

Since they lost the evolutionary battle, I think it's a reasonable assumption that Neanderthals were less aggressive than Homo sapiens. I'm puzzled about the testosterone claim though; I would have thought testosterone production greater than that available to females would be a requirement for even the existence of males.

The assumption has always been that Humans were more adaptable to changing conditions, rather than their being "more aggressive". The larger fore brain in Humans allowed them to better utilize tools, languages and to adapt to a rapidly changing environment. The idea that the losers in all situations are the 'meek and mild' is a vast oversimplification of the natural world.

@awnlee jawking

I've done some tinkering with the female's anatomy, and there might be other reasons for female reader dissonance.

Ha-ha. Let me guess, six breasts, or maybe teeth on their vaginas (another common theme is male literature)?

Dominions Son

@Crumbly Writer

or maybe teeth on their vaginas (another common theme is male literature)


That something I've never seen except in succubus stories where the male victim dies.

Why would any guy find that appealing?

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
awnlee_jawking

@Crumbly Writer


Let me guess, six breasts, or maybe teeth on their vaginas (another common theme is male literature)?


Extra breasts is on the table but I forgot it was such a cliche. One of the things I'm thinking of is for the female to come from a warmer planet and therefore have a higher body temperature. Oh no, hot pussy - another cliche! Ice dildos seem a reasonably common theme in erotic literature so I'm assuming a cooler penis will be pleasurable to the female.

AJ

awnlee jawking

@Crumbly Writer


The assumption has always been that Humans were more adaptable to changing conditions


In view of discoveries that Neanderthals were tool users and had language and art, I think that assumption is being revealed as anthropocentric.

AJ

Replies:   docholladay
docholladay

@awnlee jawking


@Crumbly Writer

The assumption has always been that Humans were more adaptable to changing conditions

In view of discoveries that Neanderthals were tool users and had language and art, I think that assumption is being revealed as anthropocentric.


Regardless it just goes to prove we don't have all the answers. Its funny sometimes looking at all the possibilities and wondering what really happened.

Replies:   richardshagrin
richardshagrin

@docholladay

The Neanderthals spent all their time in caves painting pictures. The Cro-Magnon people spent their time reproducing more kids. We out-breed the competition. Like the sign at McDonalds, billions and billions served.

Franco

Bait and Switch by Dark Brother on sexstories.com has sex between a human male and non-human alien. I stopped reading when their liaison resulted in conception.

Crumbly Writer

@Dominions Son

That something I've never seen except in succubus stories where the male victim dies.

Why would any guy find that appealing?

Sorry, that should have read "[women with] teeth in their vaginas". I remember a couple of New York Times bestsellers that featured that as a plot element, and I believe one SOL story as well.

The appeal is a general misogynist view of women as 'man eaters'. The imagery is a thinly-veiled analogy of women 'eating men's masculinity', though in the bestselling novel I remember, it served to prevent rapes of the alien women by human men. Though I can't remember the title of the story after this many years.

awnlee_jawking

Extra breasts is on the table but I forgot it was such a cliche.

When I wrote "Stranded", I wanted non-traditional 'humantisic' aliens, so I based them on heavier and lighter gravities. One of the charaters was crab-like, had four small breasts (placed at 90degrees around her circular upper body).

It was difficult to picture, but it got the 'shock value' over encountering such creatures across to the reader.

Ice dildos seem a reasonably common theme in erotic literature so I'm assuming a cooler penis will be pleasurable to the female.

If the alien woman came from a hotter planet, they'd probably enjoy more heat, not less!

In view of discoveries that Neanderthals were tool users and had language and art, I think that assumption is being revealed as anthropocentric.

Not completely. It's acknowledged that they used tools (just as chimps and apes do), but it's believed humans were better adapted to change to the approaching ice age to sweep over Europe at the time the Neanderthals died out. The 'tool' connection isn't that humans used stone tools, but were more likely to adapt their environments to the weather.

madnige

@Zealmark12

Dead tree, C.J.Cherryh's 'Foreigner' series has this as in important plot thread between two main characters. Not much sex at all, just about three breif mentions in 17 books so far, but heavy on the politics, human-human, human-alien and alien-alien.

Dominions Son

@Crumbly Writer

The appeal is a general misogynist view of women as 'man eaters'.


I still don't see how literalizing that would be appealing to men. I would think such a literal man killer female would be more appealing to dominant women then to men.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
samuelmichaels

@Zealmark12

How about The Lovers by Philip Jose Farmer?

Replies:   Zealmark12
Crumbly Writer

@Dominions Son

I still don't see how literalizing that would be appealing to men. I would think such a literal man killer female would be more appealing to dominant women then to men.

I'm not sure what the author in question was thinking at the time. Although I loved his writing and the story, I hated that aspect of the book (I'm assuming it was a he, it's been so long I honestly can't remember).

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son

@Crumbly Writer

I'm not sure what the author in question was thinking at the time.


I can understand why a misogynistic male might write a story like that, I just don't see how/why that story would appeal to men.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@Dominions Son

I can understand why a misogynistic male might write a story like that, I just don't see how/why that story would appeal to men.

I think it's just one of those things that authors get into their heads, either to complicate their story, or to work out their own issues. It appeared late in the book I'm thinking of, long after you're already invested in it, so the minor detail didn't make me put the book down, though I found the description incredibly unrealistic, even for an alien. The sheer implausibility bothered me more than any potential implications about the author's intent did.

awnlee jawking

@Crumbly Writer

Given that even today we kill people for their differences, I find it hard to believe that humans wouldn't be violent towards Neanderthals. Anyway, I bet we nicked all the best sun loungers :)

AJ

awnlee jawking

@Crumbly Writer


If the alien woman came from a hotter planet, they'd probably enjoy more heat, not less!


Human women seem quite happy with unheated dildos and vibrators.

Are there any ladies following this discussion? Would you prefer your sex toys to include heating elements?

AJ

Replies:   awnlee jawking
Zealmark12

@samuelmichaels

I'll check it out.

awnlee jawking

@awnlee jawking

At the risk of trying to continue a subject long past its sell-by date, I remembered Anita Blake and her cool-bodied vampire boyfriend. And those stories are written by a woman.

AJ

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer
Updated:

@awnlee jawking

At the risk of trying to continue a subject long past its sell-by date, I remembered Anita Blake and her cool-bodied vampire boyfriend. And those stories are written by a woman.

For some odd reason, vampire stories seem to appeal to women (more than men). Many of the recent super-successful vampire books have been written by women, and most women I know love them!

A few women are now tackling post-apocalyptic books, as far as I know, not many have tried the zombie-apocalypse stories.

By the way, if there was a sell-by-date on any of these stories, they'd have been "sold" to a publisher ages ago!

Replies:   Dicrostonyx
Oyster

C. Osborne Rapley's stories include female aliens and humans.
http://storiesonline.net/a/C_Osborne_Rapley

Some warning though: Varna: The Grojan War - Book Two is IMHO rated too high as the first 14 (out of 28 or so) chapters repeat much of book one from a different perspective. Further problems are too many "main" characters, shifting POVs and things happening because the author needed/wanted characters to be where he needed them to be with no organic way to get them there. All in all it's more of a book 1.5 and the author seemed to lose the grip on his story by expanding the scope too much.

moredrowsy
Updated:

The Subjugation Universe series by Fel is a ridiculously long epic about humans subjugated by an alien race with telepathic powers. One of the alien guards discover that the MC also have telepathic powers, interact with him, fall in love, and etc. You might like it but I found it too long and the MC was too arrogant, rigid, and hypocritical for my tolerance. You can read that series here: http://www.weavespinner.net/worlds_of_fel.htm

Dicrostonyx

@Crumbly Writer

For some odd reason, vampire stories seem to appeal to women (more than men).


I think it would be more accurate to say that in the past couple of decades the most popular or visible vampire stories have been written to appeal to the female audience.

Up until the late '80s to early '90s, there were several vampire series that were primarily aimed at men and which contained some eroticism, though obviously that was toned down by modern standards. The big example would be Anne Rice, but there were series by P.N.Elrod and Fred Saberhagen about "gentleman vampires", and I think Tanya Huff's series, despite having a female protagonist, was more neutral or male focused.

Even the Anita Blake series started out more like an action adventure series with a female gaze than being specifically female targeted, but as the series progressed the author's tone and style shifted. As it did, her popularity surged.

I recall reading an article several years ago about Twilight (before the films increased the series' visibility), in which it was pointed out that despite the book's many flaws it was very popular because there was simply nothing else aimed at that audience. Female geeks -- that is, women interested in science fiction, fantasy, and technology -- have always been marginalised, and they have had to simply enjoy media that is aimed at guys. What Twilight, and Anita Blake before it, did was to aim that content directly at an under-utilised market.

So the situation now, with vampire stories seeming to focus primarily on the female market, is not because guys aren't interested in vampires or because women aren't interested in other SF/F, but simply because most content providers aren't that imaginative. They see that vampire stories are popular with women, so they write more female focused vampire stories; nobody stops to think that there is still an untapped market for female aimed stories about space ships, zombies, superheroes, and so on.

Dominions Son

@Dicrostonyx

They see that vampire stories are popular with women, so they write more female focused vampire stories; nobody stops to think that there is still an untapped market for female aimed stories about space ships, zombies, superheroes, and so on.


And even if there were authors out there that wanted to write those kinds of stories, they would probably be ignored by the publishers.

Crumbly Writer

@Dicrostonyx

I think it would be more accurate to say that in the past couple of decades the most popular or visible vampire stories have been written to appeal to the female audience.

I've got several female friends who've been 'erotically charged' by vampires since the popular vampire movies back in the 70s. It's hardly a new phenomenon, though the medias recognition of the market (as usual) serious lags reality.

I've also noticed an upswing in post-apocalyptic stories written by women (following the success of many PA series/movies/TV shows). Though the genre seems decidedly misogynistic, there are still many women fascinated by it. Though we keep harping on the one book/movie, "The Martian" seems to have struck home with women in that, despite featuring a nearly all male cast, it doesn't push a 'male agenda', making it appeal to women as well as men.

@D.S.

And even if there were authors out there that wanted to write those kinds of stories, they would probably be ignored by the publishers.

That's why God created self-published novels (and Satan invented vanity publishers!), to give these authors a voice without having to bend over backwards (and publishing under pseudonyms) to getting their books into readers' hands.

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