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Kid Wigger:Another lost author? 2 months overdue on "Code Monkey"

bigbird1962

Anyone heard about more on this one?

Replies:   geo1951
limab

Seasonal Affective Depression. The next chapter is "in the works"

Replies:   bigbird1962
bigbird1962

@limab

Thanks, I just saw his blog post and sent a sympathetic comment. i have the same sort of issues.

Obliterous

SADD sucks, treating it is iffy, at best. cant say how much I've spent on 'treatment options'

Replies:   Michael Loucks
Michael Loucks

@Obliterous

SADD sucks, treating it is iffy, at best. cant say how much I've spent on 'treatment options'


If you haven't tried Vitamin D supplements, you might want to. That has worked for me (2000-4000iu). I'm no doctor, just reporting personnel success.

docholladay

@Michael Loucks

If you haven't tried Vitamin D supplements, you might want to. That has worked for me (2000-4000iu). I'm no doctor, just reporting personnel success.


Probably as good or even better than those Psychiatrists. I have found that they use patients to experiment with different drugs. I even had one say he wanted me to volunteer so he could see what effects different drugs would have. I conned that damned doctor into letting me walk out the door. Then I ran like hell was coming. I left that city and state without even stopping to pack a bag.

Replies:   sejintenej
sejintenej

@docholladay

I have found that they use patients to experiment with different drugs. I even had one say he wanted me to volunteer so he could see what effects different drugs would have.


Specialists do not always know best and some will deliberately act against the best interests of the patient because they don't listen.

I also have been one such guinea pig. With many many drugs available it took several years starting about 2003 to work out what combination kept my condition under control. After +/- 12 years I saw a new consultant who decided that although I had a touch of the all embracing condition previously diagnosed as heading my problem an allergy was one which had previously been considered a minor element in the equation but was actually responsible. Consequently he instructed me to discontinue inhalers A and B immediately and to use newer but not recently developed inhaler X instead. The improvement was almost instantaneous and monumental.

There have been two new elements in the treatment protocol; the doctor's surgery must now do routine follow-up assessments and the regional health authority has just started such follow-ups as well.

Six months ago the regional health wallah (unpleasant bit of work) declared that my consultant was wrong and ordered me to go back to the older less effective treatment in words not placed before polite company. Today the nurse specialist at the doctors also asked why I had dropped inhaler B though she was more pleasant and accepted that it had been previously holding me back.

Replies:   docholladay
docholladay

@sejintenej

I also have been one such guinea pig.


And the major problem is that the so-called doctor has more rights than the patient. If the doctor swears to a judge its for your protection. Guess who's word will be accepted, even when the doctor is also the one controlling the patient's treatment. The patient unless they have high powered legal representation will have no rights. That is why I ran. I knew just how much power that so-called doctor had.

Replies:   Vlad_Inhaler
Vlad_Inhaler

@docholladay

I have the strong impression that sejintenej and yourself are in different countries and legal systems. In particular, it is the regional health wallah causing the problems in his case.

Replies:   sejintenej
Obliterous

@Michael Loucks

If you haven't tried Vitamin D supplements, you might want to. That has worked for me (2000-4000iu). I'm no doctor, just reporting personnel success.


For me its a combination of D, melatonin, and light therapy. Quitting smoking helped a lot as well.

sejintenej

@Vlad_Inhaler

I have the strong impression that sejintenej and yourself are in different countries and legal systems. In particular, it is the regional health wallah causing the problems in his case.

Different countries perhaps but when there is a difference between doctor and patient then I suspect that the patient has to have good evidence to outdo the doctor. In my case the recorded results (I have had to do tests twice a day and record them over many years) would have won out.
Yes, the wallah was not listening, being awkward and I simply ignored his instructions. At the following quarterly checkup the new nurse specialist accepted my decision when given the facts.

Replies:   docholladay
sejintenej

@Michael Loucks

If you haven't tried Vitamin D supplements, you might want to. That has worked for me (2000-4000iu). I'm no doctor, just reporting personnel success

I have heard of similar success several times - it is not just you. There has also been talk of treatment by exposure to special lights

Replies:   AmigaClone
AmigaClone

@sejintenej

For those who can afford it in terms of time and money, taking some vacation time and traveling somewhere where it's summer can provide a temporary break.

Replies:   tendertouch  sejintenej
tendertouch

@AmigaClone

Mine was bad enough that I moved to somewhere with more winter sunshine. Not cheap but funerals are both expensive and traumatic.

richardshagrin

@tendertouch

funerals are both expensive and traumatic.

Depends on whose funeral. After all, for the right person dying funeral begins with f u n.

geo1951

@bigbird1962

from libby,

his chapters are like novels almost.he has been late in the past,so i'm sure the chapter will be along soon.
i look forward to each one!!

docholladay

@sejintenej

Different countries perhaps but when there is a difference between doctor and patient then I suspect that the patient has to have good evidence to outdo the doctor


For any mental health diagnosis. To fight the doctor you will need a good lawyer and witnesses who's testimony will not only standup in court but override the doctor's statements. Unless you have enough money forget the lawyer since they are not cheap. I did not have any where near enough money for a good lawyer and since I have always been a loner, the witnesses were very slim not to mention their testimony probably would not have been considered as being valid.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
redlion75

We had child boston taken from her family because a 2nd Dr disagreed with her primary Dr on her diagnosis.luckily they got her back before the new Drs killed her.

Replies:   docholladay  sejintenej
docholladay

@redlion75

Its funny how doctors have more power than people realize and its extremely rare that they lose in court.

sejintenej

@AmigaClone

For those who can afford it in terms of time and money, taking some vacation time and traveling somewhere where it's summer can provide a temporary break.

Change employers to a company which sends you there on expenses! (You might have to start the company so ...)

sejintenej

@redlion75

We had child boston taken from her family because a 2nd Dr disagreed with her primary Dr on her diagnosis.luckily they got her back before the new Drs killed her.

An American friend of ours had some internal very painful condition for which her doctor had her x-rayed. As a result she was sent to a different hospital who refused to accept the x-rays and did a new set. This transfer from pillar to post has repeated for so long that the latest hospital has refused to treat her because her insides have been so burned up that she is being left to die in agony.

Crumbly Writer

@tendertouch

Not cheap but funerals are both expensive and traumatic.

They're especially traumatic for those who die!

Crumbly Writer

@docholladay

For any mental health diagnosis. To fight the doctor you will need a good lawyer and witnesses who's testimony will not only standup in court but override the doctor's statements. Unless you have enough money forget the lawyer since they are not cheap. I did not have any where near enough money for a good lawyer and since I have always been a loner, the witnesses were very slim not to mention their testimony probably would not have been considered as being valid.

In writing a story, I researched the state's medical emergency laws, and was appalled by what I found. When I included it in a story, readers refused to accept that patients could be forced to undergo treatments they wanted no part of, but as long as there's 'an immediate threat' (at least in the minds of the doctor and a single judge), they're free to order any treatment they damn well feel like.

The fact that so many are shocked by simple statements of fact demonstrate that few realize the extent that these laws (limiting patients' right) persist. Even with DNR orders, if the doctor treating you doesn't agree with your decision, he can do whatever the fuck he desires—regardless of the personal cost to you (i.e. loss of independence, quality of life, ability to function independently, and insufficient income to afford the necessary medical treatments).

In other words, a single religious idiot, and all your rights are flushed down the tubes.

redlion75

What country allows that, since here in the states that is very illegal and called assault. You can't even do c p r on someone that doesn't want it unless they are unconscious.

Replies:   sejintenej  The Outsider
sejintenej

@redlion75

What country allows that, since here in the states that is very illegal and called assault. You can't even do c p r on someone that doesn't want it unless they are unconscious

We have a potentially similar situation in the UK. Every company of over a certain size (I think 10 staff) must, by law, have a qualified first aider but if the first aider does anything at all even exactly as taught then the subject can sue them for assault. They get no help from the state and my last employer had policy that a) they would not indemnify the first aider and b) if the company was sued and lost then the first aider had to cover all their costs, fines and other payments.

I spent about 17 years working as a first responder on the motor racing tracks. We got a lot of training and the concept was that hopefully a doctor would arrive within two minutes of being summoned. In the meantime we were on our own and in theory would be liable if we carried out any first aid. Some of the accidents were extremely gruesome (one injured driver actually begged to die)and we were at risk ourselves. In one bad six week period over 40 marshals were killed on the tracks.

The general opinion was that if a first aider was sued the case would normally be thrown out of court.

Replies:   awnlee jawking
awnlee jawking

@sejintenej

the concept was that hopefully a doctor would arrive within two minutes of being summoned


The patients should hope that paramedics got there before a doctor. First responders have more training and experience in stabilising patients than doctors.

AJ

Replies:   sejintenej
The Outsider

@redlion75

The only reason to do CPR is if the person is in cardiac arrest and, therefore, unconscious. They're already dead, so it's not like they'll get worse...

Replies:   redlion75
redlion75

@The Outsider

Slightly rhetorical though here we have the good Samaritan law.it says if you try and fail then your good, but a dr. or a nurse have higher levels of training and higher standards of "I tried".

sejintenej
Updated:

@awnlee jawking


The patients should hope that paramedics got there before a doctor. First responders have more training and experience in stabilising patients than doctors.

AJ


We sometimes had paramedics on post but doctors come with the whole caboodle such as "jaws of life", ambulance etc. To bring them out required that the cars racing on the track had to be brought under full control. Remember also that members of track teams also had first aid knowledge. There is also a fully equipped medical station on site which can carry out some surgery if required.

As for your comment about doctors' crash site abilities, that is what we were taught back in the 1950's. It is now not always so but the track doctors had many years of experience which your ordinary general practitioner didn't have. As for the crash teams they were very very good - a car could have been taken apart in just a minute or so because the moment they arrived they had their cutters in their hands ready to cut.

As I wrote, our training was first class, some of the practical work under conditions professionals were banned from entering.

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