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looking for story

mrkornelius

okay, my description might be a little shady and i'm not 100% sure the story was on SOL. iirc it was about some young guy who kinda became a superhero and helped the fbi blow up a human slavery ring. he is some kind of super martial arts guy aswell, but he never wants to be honored for his good deeds. the story (and that's the part where i'm not quite sure) may or may not feature emma watson. if anyone can find this story for me.... you'd be a genius!

Ernest Bywater

@mrkornelius

Cold Creek's The Defenceman - what you describe is later in the 3 story series and you need to read from the start to get the most of it.

http://storiesonline.net/s/59488/the-defenceman

tppm

@mrkornelius

helped the FBI blow up a human slavery ring


No help on finding the story, but I hope that "blow up" is figurative, because if it's literal you've got a lot of dead and injured (former) slaves.

Replies:   Ernest Bywater
Ernest Bywater
Updated:

@tppm

everything he asks about is in The Defenceman or it's sequels of Dman2 and Dman3 which is in progress. Main character is a Canadian college student hockey player in the USA who becomes a model for Calvin Klein then saves the life of a Japanese girl and things grow from that when he learns martial arts, later saves Emma Watson from an acid attack, keeps refusing honours, quickly becomes atop martial artists but doesn't compete for belts. To help the English crown he penetrates a white slaver ring in New York and the UK military take it down.

edit - forgot to say - - Yes, people say blow up to mean it was destroyed, but in this case he should have said take down.

milehigh65

Loved that series. I wish CC would get back to it.

MH

Replies:   Wheezer
mrkornelius

dammit, thank you guys. I totally forgot it was the Dman series. woopdidoo

Wheezer

@milehigh65

I just finished reading it. Waaaaay too much minutia about Hockey, but an otherwise interesting story. Anyone know if Cold Creek has any intent to finish it? Dman3 will soon drop onto the incomplete & inactive list.

Replies:   Ernest Bywater
jr88

I am hoping he updates again around the holidays. He published chapter 7 on 2013-12-24 and chapter 8 on 2014-12-22. Hopefully we get chapter 9 at around the same time. His posting schedule had fallen way off before those two chapters, so Dman may never be finished.

Ernest Bywater

@Wheezer

Oddly enough, I found the lots of Ice Hockey stuff interesting, more so than the sex and some of the relationship conflict scenes.

shinerdrinker

My current story is going to focus mainly on the real football (American Football). And I said it before and I'll say it again, if I can write football action scenes as well as Cold Creek writes hockey scenes then I'll consider my story a success.

Let the football debate begin. JK. ;-)

Replies:   awnlee jawking
richardshagrin
Updated:

I have said it before, so much football is done in coming of age stories with various championship games as the climax is boring. Other sports like hockey, or golf, or soccer (real football in the rest of the world), or almost anything (ice dancing in Dance of a Lifetime) is by comparison fresh and interesting. Cricket is boring as hell, but would be better as the hero's sport than more American Football.

In conclusion, football (American) is boring. Don't write about it. Maybe it needs to be a tag, so I can avoid stories with it.

Replies:   remarcsd
remarcsd

@richardshagrin

Bzzzt. Soccer is only the third string of football in Australia behind Rugby at #2 and Aussie Rules at #1. Aussie Rules of course being the true football as it is the only one of the codes where the majority of scoring, the purpose of the game, is actually done by foot.

Replies:   Ernest Bywater
Ernest Bywater
Updated:

@remarcsd


Bzzzt. Soccer is only the third string of football in Australia behind Rugby at #2 and Aussie Rules at #1. Aussie Rules of course being the true football as it is the only one of the codes where the majority of scoring, the purpose of the game, is actually done by foot.


I'd have to do a lot of research to check the current status, but about ten years ago I did research this issue, and a lot depends on what you use for a yardstick. If you mean people following professional football at the stadium and on the media, then you're right - a large part being the amount of money spent on advertising. However, if you mean the amount of late teens and adults playing amateur football, then soccer has more then the other two together (that was 10 years ago). The school kids play a lot of rugby and aussie rules, but most stop playing when they start work, while the majority of the soccer addicts keep it up into their 50s etc.

typo edit

richardshagrin

I don't know how many countries there are where you say football or some variant spelling ball a little differently and people think what we in the USA call Soccer. Where it is football people may not know what soccer is. That one needs to say Australian rules or American or Canadian football is an indication most of the world things football is played with a round ball and most of the time, except goalies not touched by the hands. aka soccer where football is played with an oblate spheroid sometimes kicked but mostly held and run with, or sometimes passed and caught by the hands. That may also describe rugby. Sorry, I am trying to distinguish other large ball games from football/soccer. There is also basketball and baseball and softball and tennis and golf and lots of sports that use balls. Field hockey, maybe lacrosse although I am not sure they use balls. Guys need them to play it, it may be the worlds most violent sport, unless you count bullfighting where the bull always losses and mostly dies. I though of another violent sport that uses a ball, water polo. Polo on horses uses a ball, hit by a mallet, a long mallet.

Most places the sport of the masses, since it only requires a ball, although a field with goals is nice, is soccer. Which in those places is called football.

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son

@richardshagrin

baseball and softball and tennis and golf and lots of sports that use balls. Field hockey


+ Cricket, Polo = sports where you hit a ball with a stick = stick ball :)

Andrew_Wiggin

I once turned on the TV and a cricket match came on between India and I don't know who. I sat there and watched the thing for over 3 hours, and I still didn't have a clue what was going on, how they were keeping score, what they were doing and why. But the people in the stands were going nuts.
My recommendation: no coming of age stories revolving around cricket.
Re: The Defenseman, Dman2, Dman3 --- I too liked the hockey sequences. But the story became more and more outlandish as it progressed. Queen Elizabeth became his personal buddy. He was modeling for big bucks, had the opportunity to play major league hockey for big bucks, was going to college, designed a video game that was going to make him millions, had something like 6 girl friends - can't remember how many. And then because of a minor dispute, they all walked out on him permanently and he was fine with that.
The story was veering into insanity. I'm sorry that the author lost interest in it, but then again, I wasn't surprised. How much further could he take it?

bigeck11

@mrkornelius

lucky jim 2 sounds good for this http://storiesonline.net/s/76190/lucky-jim-ii

awnlee jawking

@shinerdrinker

Remember that only Americans will have an understanding of the minutiae of American Rugby, so if you hope to make your story comprehensible to foreign readers, keep the technical detail to a minimum.

Ice hockey minutiae also don't transfer well to the UK, but the Dman series is so well written it's enjoyable nonetheless.

AJ

docholladay

@mrkornelius

Could it be "A Master's Ring" by ElSol available on SOL. I ran across this one about 20 years ago I believe in an earlier version on a BBS.

sejintenej

@awnlee jawking

Ice hockey minutiae also don't transfer well to the UK, but the Dman series is so well written it's enjoyable nonetheless.

I used to follow the Brighton (UK) team when they were unbeatable (until their premier player lost his leg following a hit on the goal) but that was totally different to Defenceman ice hockey

Ernest Bywater

@awnlee jawking

Ice hockey minutiae also don't transfer well to the UK


I'm an Aussie who'd never seen an ice hockey game before reading the Dman stories, but found the on ice story parts more interesting than most of the rest, interesting enough to watch some ice hockey on youtube

Wheezer

A comedian once said "I went to a fight the other night and a hockey game broke out!" :P

Replies:   Ernest Bywater
Ernest Bywater

@Wheezer

A comedian once said "I went to a fight the other night and a hockey game broke out!"


I thought that was the case with all ice hockey games!! Don't the spectators go to watch the fights and get upset when only a hockey game occurs?

Replies:   Wheezer
Wheezer

@Ernest Bywater

Pretty much. Same for fans of Stock Car racing. "What race? I go for the crashes."

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son

@Wheezer

Pretty much. Same for fans of Stock Car racing. "What race? I go for the crashes."


They are spectacular, but it's safer to watch on television.

Replies:   sejintenej
sejintenej

@Dominions Son

re: Stock Car racing

They are spectacular, but it's safer to watch on television

Never been there but spent 15 years working on European motor racing tracks - Formula 3 and all that. Get a Le Mans type "sports car" on full song past you eight feet away - that is spectacular. One year two touched wheels and one cleared the 12 foot safety netting and ended up in the spectators enclosure. No one hurt but I expect there were some smelly pants after that.

It's the training which is dangerous - at least one person in hospital with burns every RAE training day.

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son
Updated:

@sejintenej


re: Stock Car racing


NASCAR goes to great lengths to try to insure spectator safety.

However, put 40-50 cars on a 2.5 mile oval track for a 500 mile race at speeds up to 200 MPH and multi-car pileups can get exceedingly energetic.

Cars have ended up in the stands and spectators have been injured.

http://www.slate.com/articles/sports/explainer/2013/02/daytona_spectator_injuries_is_car_racing_the_most_dangerous_spectator_sport.html

ETA:

PS. None of the cars in professional level "stock" car racing are stock cars by any reasonable definition. While stock car racing did start out with using stock production street cars, the cars they use today are all one-off custom from the ground up.

Replies:   docholladay
docholladay

@Dominions Son

None of the cars in professional level "stock" car racing are stock cars by any reasonable definition. While stock car racing did start out with using stock production street cars, the cars they use today are all one-off custom from the ground up.


How true that is. The original stock car racing was created as an off shoot of moonshine distribution. From that start it has grown and been transformed in many ways over the years. I think the first cars were based on cars modified to deliver the moonshine.

Replies:   Wheezer
Wheezer

@docholladay

Yep. Those moonshine cars were souped-up hotrods made to be able to outrun & out-handle any "Revinoors" pursuit vehicles while maintaining a stock exterior appearance to avoid attracting attention.

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