Home « Forum « Lost Stories

Forum: Lost Stories

Looking for Mind-reading stories

jhncanson

Can anyone give me a list of stories that heavily involves mind reading(surface thoughts gradually subconscious) and/or an empath who can read people via their emotions.

no mind control(no fun in that, anti-climatic)

ustourist

@jhncanson

Second Time Through is based round an empath / mind reading ability, and although ongoing, there is enough already written to keep you busy for a few days.
Also, if you can find them - no longer on SOL - the Combat Wizard stories by GraySapien were based on empaths.

Replies:   jhncanson
Ernest Bywater

@jhncanson

The main character in most of the Clan Amir series is an empath who can sense where people are by their emotions and when they lie. Gordy / Gerry Mannheim is the character.

http://storiesonline.net/universe/891/clan-amir

jhncanson
Updated:

@ustourist

That's been on my list lately but i never got to read it yet, i always get put off by the over-arching plot of good vs evil.

Edit: so many interesting possibilities to explore in mind control series but it always dont happen because of good vs evil.

It always goes to enslaving girls to bad men trying to steal his girls to him fighting the organization behind the bad man.

Replies:   ustourist
ustourist

@jhncanson

Second Time Through mixes science fiction, mythology and a do-over, and though a lot has to do with teenage sex, the 'good vs evil' isn't pushed that much, it is more of an underlying quest for certain items.
If you want a good vs evil empath, but without the enslaving of females, try the Wizard series by MisguidedChild. He is empathetic with animals but the stories are basically about his growing up.

Replies:   jhncanson  jhnmakii2nd
jhncanson

@ustourist

I don't like the good vs evil theme too much as they rush a story too much.

do-over stories to me are what mind control could be if dont focus too much on good vs evil.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@jhncanson

My "Catalyst" series features a limited mind-reading (can only communicate with certain people, and instead of good vs. evil, it's a 'what the fuck is going on' search for answers story). My next story on SOL, "The Cuckoo's Progeny" also features a limited mind-reading, but only after chapter 8 or so (a minor story element that plays into the eventual plot development).

I think Sleepwalker (author name, but similar to the story name) deals with similar concepts, but again, it's a superhero vs. evil villain type of story.

jhnmakii2nd

@ustourist

On second time through, i only read abit of the first few chapters.

I assume he was sent into a teenage body but i never read anything regarding him going to a school?

Replies:   ustourist  MarissaHorne
ustourist

@jhnmakii2nd

The school question arises in book IV, but the author had to take time out for personal health reasons and has only just restarted the story. It will probably (possibly) be clarified a bit more in the current book. So far the time frame is actually fairly short. The story starts in May and it has only reached July. Given the accident and school break, it hasn't been relevant yet.
Give it a few more chapters, the writing quality definitely improves as he gets more into the flow of it, though there is a lot of repetition.

MarissaHorne
Updated:

@jhnmakii2nd

I'm rereading it now, slowly (and mixed in with some others).

One of the early plot elements is the MCs emancipation (at the age of 16). The case was slated to be heard at the end of June, but involved him agreeing to continue school in Tennessee.

Half way through hook 2 and the case is still some two weeks into the future.

So he will go back to school, eventually

cantamelon

Dog and his boy story has mind reading.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Oyster

http://storiesonline.net/stories/bytag/mind-control
Sorted by score.

Replies:   richardshagrin
richardshagrin

@Oyster

There are a lot of high scoring stories in that mind-control list. It took 330 of them before the scores got below 7.0

samuelmichaels

@jhncanson

Can anyone give me a list of stories that heavily involves mind reading(surface thoughts gradually subconscious) and/or an empath who can read people via their emotions.

Tefler's posting Three Square Meals (on SOL, Lit, and Patreon), featuring a teenage Telepath. But it's not the usual plot. At least not usual for the telepath.

sejintenej

@jhncanson

Can anyone give me a list of stories that heavily involves mind reading(surface thoughts gradually subconscious) and/or an empath who can read people via their emotions.

There are elements of that in the Florida Friends stories; look for the ones involving Chuck and also the latest with the second Chuck called "Money"

Replies:   docholladay
Argon

@jhncanson

Try Ms Friday's stories. Caveat: TRES has some MC elements.
http://storiesonline.net/s/40627/thoughts-sensations-and-emotions

docholladay

@sejintenej

There are elements of that in the Florida Friends stories; look for the ones involving Chuck


Nice part is he doesn't like to use the gift/ability.

Replies:   docholladay
docholladay

@docholladay

The Florida Friends stories has included many examples of Mental gifts or so-called ESP usage. Its a minor characterization for one of the major characters (can't remember the exact name), one of Steve's wives as well as her mother.

Replies:   Ernest Bywater
Ernest Bywater

@docholladay

major characters


First one is Mercy, with her mother Missy, then they identify Chuck Johnson as having the ability but suppressing yet, then Lisa is known to have the ability. Some of the the kids do, Chucks Aunt and nieces do. They all turn up along the way.

Replies:   sejintenej
sejintenej
Updated:

@Ernest Bywater


major characters

First one is Mercy, with her mother Missy, then they identify Chuck Johnson "eyes" as having the ability but suppressing yet, then Lisa is known to have the ability. Some of the the kids do, Chucks Aunt and nieces do. They all turn up along the way.

My slight addition to separate two Chucks

Same series, newest story 'Money' has a second Chuck and his sister with the same ability. Haven't reread that far but I think Chuck "No Gas"'s partner Fran may have the gift.

Docholladay; IMO Chuck used the ability pretty effectively to keep himself alive at times as well as partially funding his lifestyle (like a cool billion in the French casinos)

Replies:   docholladay
docholladay

@sejintenej

IMO Chuck used the ability pretty effectively to keep himself alive at times as well as partially funding his lifestyle (like a cool billion in the French casinos)


How true, but I was referring more towards his attitude about using those gifts than the actual usage. They did help to create a major portion of his wealth, and of course they also helped save his life among others at times. Mostly he seems to try to avoid using it. That is a good trait, just imagine how easy it would be for someone to abuse those abilities.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@cantamelon

Dog and his boy story has mind reading.

Duh! That aspect completely slipped my mind (concerning the initial question).

Crumbly Writer

@docholladay

How true, but I was referring more towards his attitude about using those gifts than the actual usage. They did help to create a major portion of his wealth, and of course they also helped save his life among others at times. Mostly he seems to try to avoid using it. That is a good trait, just imagine how easy it would be for someone to abuse those abilities.

It was also a major element when he went after the one guy in Mexico (he finally acknowledges his gift and acts on it).

Replies:   docholladay
docholladay

@Crumbly Writer

It was also a major element when he went after the one guy in Mexico (he finally acknowledges his gift and acts on it).


How true DW has shown many sides to that gift. I like the way it comes across as both a gift and a curse from the point of view of the characters involved. That probably holds true with many talents regardless of the label applied to them. Like you and Ernest's storytelling gifts. At times that has to be both a great gift and curse.

Crumbly Writer

@docholladay

Like you and Ernest's storytelling gifts. At times that has to be both a great gift and curse.

Often, not being able to tell a story straight out, needed to rework it to take in such subtleties, is itself a type of 'curse' (i.e. it's a LOT more work).

Replies:   docholladay
docholladay

@Crumbly Writer

is itself a type of 'curse' (i.e. it's a LOT more work).


The curse comes from the gift refusing to let you quit telling the stories regardless of what you might want.

Ernest Bywater

@docholladay

Like you and Ernest's storytelling gifts. At times that has to be both a great gift and curse.


The biggest curse is when you think you've done the best you can on a story, and later check it for something (often viewing if a reader comment on something needs an expansion of a part of the story) and realise a little fine tuning here, a touch of word change there will add up to a smoother flowing story - and thus you end up going back through the whole story making minor touch up revisions. It all means it's a better story after you're done, but it keeps you from writing a new one (only so much time to write) and once you realise it needs doing you can't leave it alone (that's the biggest curse aspect).

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@Ernest Bywater

The biggest curse is when you think you've done the best you can on a story, and later check it for something (often viewing if a reader comment on something needs an expansion of a part of the story) and realise a little fine tuning here, a touch of word change there will add up to a smoother flowing story - and thus you end up going back through the whole story making minor touch up revisions. It all means it's a better story after you're done, but it keeps you from writing a new one (only so much time to write) and once you realise it needs doing you can't leave it alone (that's the biggest curse aspect).

After an extensive revision of "The Catalyst", I've resisted doing that again (my fans didn't seem to appreciate the extra work--at least not with my deleting the original stories and reposting the entire series as more books). However, I'd like to redo my "Great Death" series and clean it up (possibly removing the kids in the sex scenes references which bothers so many women), before I publish the next book in the series, though that'll undoubtedly take months (at the very least).

Replies:   Ernest Bywater
Ernest Bywater

@Crumbly Writer

fter an extensive revision of "The Catalyst", I've resisted doing that again


A lot depends upon how MUCH you revise it, and what you do. I'm nearing the end of a major revision of all my work and collaborations. The bulk of what I did was to change some words like as to when, while, and other words with a similar meaning in the context of that part of the story. Did the same with a lot and usages. The result was a smoother flowing story. In a few cases I expanded the text a little to clarify what I was saying - these were mostly in areas where readers had emailed saying they didn't quite get it.

The ends result was a few readers emailed to say they couldn't detect any changes just reading the story, but were able to see them all when they ran comparison software over the 2 versions. That's how a good revision should be, so slight it doesn't stand out. Heck in one story revision I add a 500 word section to better explain the thinking of some characters, and no one who contacted me had spotted the addition until after I told them where to look for it.

To me, a revision is a fine tuning process. If you change the tone or the direction or do major work, then it's a re-write -- and that's another matter I try to avoid.

The closest I've gotten to a rewrite is when someone pointed out on scene in saga length story wasn't possible because the characters couldn't access that facility, so I had to change the name of the place and how they got to it, so they could use one they were able to get access to. Minor change to the story, as a whole.

docholladay

@Ernest Bywater

The curse is a storyteller/writer is driven to tell stories in one format or another.

The gift is because you are not forced to share those abilities.

Any artist can be driven by their talents to create, but they are not forced to share their creations with anyone unless they are willing.

Crumbly Writer

@Ernest Bywater

A lot depends upon how MUCH you revise it, and what you do. I'm nearing the end of a major revision of all my work and collaborations.

In general, the key to any revision (in the eyes of reader) is whether the plot changes. Thus most will never notice much in the way of 'clean-up', unless the plot dramatically shifts.

In my case, I did a more extensive effort, both cleaning up and restructuring the entire story (from 3+ books of up to 360,000 words to 6 books all under 250,000). The story made more sense, and each book has it's own issues and conflict which they resolved. In short, the story was better. However, because the overall plot didn't change, most thought that republishing the story wasn't justified. Having been though the process, I now agree with them. Thus I see the point in cleaning up older texts, but I have a hard time justifying revising a story, unless you want to CHANGE the nature of the story (I'm preparing to rewrite one story in order to reach an entirely different market).

Call me gunshy, but I'm not sure it's worth the time and effort to clean up a story when you could invest the same time writing an entirely new story, and reap greater rewards from it as well.

Replies:   Ernest Bywater
Ernest Bywater

@Crumbly Writer


Call me gunshy, but I'm not sure it's worth the time and effort to clean up a story when you could invest the same time writing an entirely new story, and reap greater rewards from it as well.


In general, I'd agree with that. However, I've a number of incomplete works, and I'm seriously thinking about making a few major changes to the story of some, during which I'll likely clean them up a lot. But, being unpublished it makes the changes much less noticeable. The only reason to rewrite as against dump and go again is they already have a significant amount of good plot in them which can be saved.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@Ernest Bywater

In general, I'd agree with that. However, I've a number of incomplete works, and I'm seriously thinking about making a few major changes to the story of some, during which I'll likely clean them up a lot. But, being unpublished it makes the changes much less noticeable. The only reason to rewrite as against dump and go again is they already have a significant amount of good plot in them which can be saved.

If you can save an abandoned story by fleshing it out and taking it in a new direction, then by all means, play it out.

As I mentioned, I'm planning to rewrite one story (gay high-school explicit romance) to appeal to a new market (gay high-school nonsexual romance). I'm also hoping to revise my first Great Death book in time to rerelease when I publish the newest sequel (the major revision is removing the kids listening in to the various sex scenes, since they limit the story's appeal.

I've also had several story which ran aground and I shelved them until I figured out a new approach, at which point I breathed new life into them. My original 6-book series, Catalyst almost never got published because the story just didn't work. I tried a complete rewrite, ending with a very different story, before backing up and revising (to keep the original plot, but reworked so it made more sense overall).

Back to Top