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looking for a book

waldandav

I read a novel years ago about a married man, set up sent to prison, who made friends with an older prisoner, they eventually escaped but the older man died in the attempt but he passed clues to the younger man about a hidden vault that contained hidden gems and art. These were uses to fund the plastic surgery and revenge that the younger man eventually received.
I hope some one can help point me in the direction of this book.
Thanks All.

redlion75

sounds like the hawk and chimpmunk.

Replies:   jvoi2
jvoi2

@redlion75

I don't think so, it indeed sound similar but in the hawk and the chipmunk it's accidentally that he finds the cave ;)

otherwise it sounds awfully like a modern rendition of "the count of monte cristo" by Alexandre Dumas

http://storiesonline.net/s/61544/the-count-of-monte-cristo

Replies:   tppm
ian181

I think The Shawshank Redemption by Stephen King went something along those lines.

tppm

@jvoi2

otherwise it sounds awfully like a modern rendition of "The Count of Monte Cristo" by Alexandre Dumas


The OPs description gives no indication that it's a modern rendition.

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son
Updated:

@tppm


The OPs description gives no indication that it's a modern rendition.


This wouldn't make it a modern rendition?


These were uses to fund the plastic surgery and revenge that the younger man eventually received.


Who do you imagine was doing plastic surgery in the early 19th century?

Replies:   richardshagrin
richardshagrin

@Dominions Son

The history of plastic surgery goes as far back as 2000 B.C. In India and Egypt, ancient physicians practiced some of the most rudimentary forms of plastic surgery. According to a 1994 article in the Washington Post by Thomas V. DiBacco, reeds were used in Egyptian nose reconstruction to keep the nostrils open as the nose healed. In 600 B.C., the Indian doctor Acharya Sushrut published the Sushruta Samhita, a collection of medical texts about plastic surgery, the first of its kind in ancient history.

In another part of the world, plastic surgery also experienced its earliest developments. Around the first century B.C., Roman physicians practiced early beginnings of surgical methods to alter the body. With a culture that highly valued the physique and beauty of the natural human body, ancient Roman doctors operated on former gladiators whose bodies and faces had become severely damaged. At this time, Roman medical writer Aulus Cornelius Celsus wrote "De Medicina," which outlined some of the methods used in the practice of breast reduction and reconstruction of the ears, lips and noses - another important early text for plastic surgery.

"Despite its rocky historical past, plastic surgery is a growing multi-billion industry."

After the fall of Rome at the end of the third century A.D., the progress of plastic surgery appears to have stalled for several hundred years. During the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, the spread of Christianity forbade any kind of surgical changes to the body, as dictated by Pope Innocent III.

Then, in the late 1500s, a breakthrough in plastic surgery occurred. In Sicily, Italy, Gasparo Tagliacozzi experimented with skin grafts for nose reconstructive surgery. However, Tagliacozzi's progress was hindered by the influence of the Church. In addition, the technology of general anesthesia was still in its earliest stages at this time, which made any plastic surgery attempts extremely painful.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@richardshagrin

Then, in the late 1500s, a breakthrough in plastic surgery occurred. In Sicily, Italy, Gasparo Tagliacozzi experimented with skin grafts for nose reconstructive surgery. However, Tagliacozzi's progress was hindered by the influence of the Church. In addition, the technology of general anesthesia was still in its earliest stages at this time, which made any plastic surgery attempts extremely painful.

Ha! Look at the results of early facial surgery from the early twentieth century and you'll be horrified. People with only half their face, infections ravaging their bodies. It hardly 'took off' until they figured out how to do it safely--which wasn't until they could make tiny incisions with analgesics very late in the twentieth Century that it 'caught on'.

redlion75

I think it was actually the early 20th since at least john Dillinger is known to have had plastic surgery inthe20s I think it was. I have even read the jesse james was supposed to have had it done.

LonelyDad

Men were men in those days. Also don't forget the opiates. You can stand a lot of pain stoned out of your mind.

redlion75

I spent 3yrs drinking away the pain of my marriage then remembered I was already divorced. imagine my surprised look when I sobered up to find myself in the army.

tppm

When Monte Cristo got back to Paris and started exacting his revenge he had changed sufficiently that people who had known him intimately before his arrest didn't recognize him. I haven't read the book, and such details get lost when media are changed, so I don't know what was done to change his appearance, but something was.

redlion75

it was just the fact the he was gone for about 20yrs. 13 in prison the later traveling and learning to be aristocratic. also doing research on his enemies in the book he learns of treason committed by 1 that allowed him to rise in power among other things not in either movie. I prefer the book myself

Dominions Son

@tppm

You would be surprised how much can be accomplished with just a change in dress, body language and facial hair/hair style.

The main character started the story as a sailor, then he was imprisoned for six years.

Malnourishment, disease, lack of grooming, and lack of sunlight exposure, all common conditions in prisons of that era can also leave a lasting mark on a persons appearance.

Then there is just time itself. People's appearances change as they age. We generally don't notice it much in people we are around all the time, because it is fairly slow.

Then you have the issue that people's memories are imperfect.

I find it not at all remarkable that people who hadn't seen him in more than six years would not recognize him.

Even if cosmetic surgery would have been an option, it would have been extremely risky and likely unnecessary.

Bondi Beach

@tppm

When Monte Cristo got back to Paris and started exacting his revenge he had changed sufficiently that people who had known him intimately before his arrest didn't recognize him. I haven't read the book, and such details get lost when media are changed, so I don't know what was done to change his appearance, but something was.


It was aging and the time in prison. He spent 14 years in prison before he escaped. The novel then jumps forward 10 years or so, when this polished aristocratic fortysomething single man (with Haydée, a 14- or 15-year-old Albanian slave in his entourage) reappears. It's Edmond Dantes, now the Count of Monte Cristo.

Monte Cristo doesn't use a disguise when he moves in Parisian society, although he employs them when convenient (an Abbé, an Englishman, among others). In the final confrontations with those who betrayed him, he rips off his clothing to reveal his old sailor's outfit underneath to shock them into realizing who he is.

Interestingly enough, it's his old love, Mercedes, who recognizes him as soon as she sets eyes on him, even if she doesn't acknowledge it.

The movies are garbage. Read the book. Not the abridged editions. It's a potboiler, but what's wrong with that? The Robin Buss translation (Penguin Classics) is the only good modern one in English.

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