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Thoughts on, (Thanks to cmsix for the inspiration, etc etc)

4041

When never I see this "Thanks to cmsix for the inspiration" I can figure that usually the author will never finish the story! If YOU are really "inspired by cmsix" then for god sake finish the story BEFORE starting another "inspired" story!

A "hymen" is not inside the vigina! Rather it is a covering over the entrance to the vigina!!!! Unless you are a Total NERD VIRGIN and never been laid!

Finished your story, GOOD! NOW read what you have put on paper! Too many misspelt words, incorrect words, wrong context or words that have been omitted! Use spell check and think when you read as to what you have said!

Learn punctuation rules, example Author "Renpet" writes incredible stories, punctuated correctly and even has a section where he elaborates "why" he punciates the way he does! His stories are smooth reading!

In story writing it's the little things that count!

richardshagrin

@4041

In story writing it's the little things that count

There are authors who praise their editors. Does that mean the editors are little things?

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@richardshagrin

There are authors who praise their editors. Does that mean the editors are little things?

Only those who are capable of counting. 'D

Capt. Zapp

@4041

In story writing it's the little things that count!


I seem to recall a story about a 'little thing' that counted, but most readers prefer them to be at least average sized or larger.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@Capt. Zapp

I seem to recall a story about a 'little thing' that counted, but most readers prefer them to be at least average sized or larger.

I don't know, they certainly loved Napoleon.

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son
Updated:

@Crumbly Writer


I don't know, they certainly loved Napoleon.


Contrary to myth, Napoleon was of normal height for his time. The whole myth of him being short started because he predates international standardization of weights and measures and at the time french feet and inches were longer than English feet and inches.

The English press made a big deal about his height without realizing the need for unit conversion.

ETA: Cite: https://www.thoughtco.com/was-napoleon-bonaparte-short-1221108

Replies:   Not_a_ID
red61544

@4041

...where he elaborates "why" he punciates the way he does!

In story writing it's the little things that count!

Not_a_ID

@Dominions Son

Contrary to myth, Napoleon was of normal height for his time. The whole myth of him being short started because he predates international standardization of weights and measures and at the time french feet and inches were longer than English feet and inches.


So you're saying France was Texas before Texas was Texas?

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son

@Not_a_ID

So you're saying France was Texas before Texas was Texas?


Texas was never Texas in the way you mean. If we cut Alaska into two equally sized states, Texas would become the third largest state.

Replies:   REP
REP

@Dominions Son

Global warming regardless of cause may shrink Alaska to the second largest state. :)

Replies:   Dominions Son
BlacKnight

@4041

A "hymen" is not inside the vigina! Rather it is a covering over the entrance to the vigina!!!! Unless you are a Total NERD VIRGIN and never been laid!


I won't argue the "Total NERD" part, but it's been a quarter-century and quite a few girls since I was a virgin who'd never been laid, and I've never encountered a hymen in the flesh, as it were.

Even the first girl I was with, who I'm almost certain was also a virgin, didn't have any sign of one (and I examined her pretty thoroughly). It didn't seem polite to interrogate her as to why not, but there are plenty of ways a physically active girl could break hers accidentally or deliberately long before she ever had a boy inside her. And I don't think any of the other women I've been with were virgins when I got to them.

What I'm saying is that I suspect that virgin girls with their freshness seal intact are a lot less common in reality than in erotic fiction, and it's entirely possible to have no first-hand experience with hymens without being a "Total NERD VIRGIN".

Also, if you're going to go off on rants about spelling and punctuation, it behooves you to get yours straight. In particular, it's spelled "vagina", and you've used about three years' quota of exclamation marks in this one post. There are other ways to end a sentence, and I don't mean "use more exclamation marks"!!!!

Replies:   REP
REP

@BlacKnight

I'm under the impression that there is an unstated agreement to not nit-pic the typos and other errors posters make in their posts.

If he wants to use exclamation marks in a rant, I don't see that as a problem since they are meant to indicate strong emotion.

Dominions Son

@REP

Global warming regardless of cause may shrink Alaska to the second largest state. :)


Unlikely All that land bound ice actually pushes the land down. If the ice melts, sea level rises, but so does the land in around 90% of Alaska.

Replies:   Not_a_ID  Crumbly Writer
Not_a_ID

@Dominions Son

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/2013/09/rising-seas-ice-melt-new-shoreline-maps/

Doesn't look like Alaska would lose enough land for Texas to get much closer in land area, particularly as it also loses land in the deal.

BlacKnight

@REP

I'm under the impression that there is an unstated agreement to not nit-pic the typos and other errors posters make in their posts.

Yeah, but I generally consider that courtesy suspended when they're going off on other peoples'. Glass houses and all that.

If he wants to use exclamation marks in a rant, I don't see that as a problem since they are meant to indicate strong emotion.

In the admittedly small sample (two) of 4041's posts that I've read, every single sentence ends in at least one exclamation mark. That's excessive by any measure.

Replies:   REP
Safe_Bet

@4041

I personally LIKE just about everything cmsix wrote, in spite of his errors and repeatedness (is that even a word?). In my mind, this thread is a textbook example of why people say, "If you don't like it, don't freakin' read it!"

P.S. As to that whole "unstated agreement to not nit-pic" nonsense (above and beyond you nit-PICKING someone else's nit-PICKING of somebody's nit-PICKING?) pot::kettle, sweetheart!

P.P.S. !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! There you go 4041!!!! You are welcome to all of the extra exclamation points I had left over. Looks like you'll be needing them.

Banadin

Been a tough winter. Cabin fever is rampant.

Crumbly Writer

@REP

I'm under the impression that there is an unstated agreement to not nit-pic the typos and other errors posters make in their posts.

If he wants to use exclamation marks in a rant, I don't see that as a problem since they are meant to indicate strong emotion.

I concur. We point out other author's typos, because they're expected to pay attention to how they use words, but we don't pick on readers who unintentionally type the wrong thing.

We get so few readers willing to venture into the author debates, let's not chase them away by nit-picking everything they say!

Crumbly Writer

@Dominions Son

Unlikely All that land bound ice actually pushes the land down. If the ice melts, sea level rises, but so does the land in around 90% of Alaska.

How do rising seas cause the land to rise? Rock and earth don't float (dirt does, but only below a certain quantity). I can see it now, the mountains in Alaska will be bobbing along in the waters covering the state. 'D

Crumbly Writer

I personally LIKE just about everything cmsix wrote, in spite of his errors and repeatedness (is that even a word?). In my mind, this thread is a textbook example of why people say, "If you don't like it, don't freakin' read it!"

4041 never claimed to read Cmsix. Instead, he referred to all the authors to write that their stories "are inspired by the works of cmsix", which is like announcing, "just like him, I have absolutely no intention of finishing this story, so don't get your hopes up".

4041's claims are valid.

Replies:   Safe_Bet
Ernest Bywater

@Crumbly Writer

How do rising seas cause the land to rise?


the theory is the changing pressure on the tectonic plates will cause some to tilt and others to slide over, which result in changes elsewhere on the plates.

Dominions Son
Updated:

@Crumbly Writer


How do rising seas cause the land to rise?


They don't, but rising land and rising seas are both caused by shrinking of land bound ice masses.


Rock and earth don't float


Yes, they do. They are floating on molten rock and metal in the deeper layers of the earth.

Glaciers and ice sheets are so massive that when they sit on dry land, they push the Earth's crust down into the mantle. When they melt, that weight is taken off the crust and it floats/rises back up.

Much of the land in the Northern half of North America is still rising from the melting of the ice sheets at the end of the last ice age.

Replies:   Not_a_ID
Safe_Bet

@Crumbly Writer

4041 never claimed to read Cmsix. Instead, he referred to all the authors to write that their stories "are inspired by the works of cmsix", which is like announcing, "just like him, I have absolutely no intention of finishing this story, so don't get your hopes up".


Yeah, okay... I SHOULD have been more clear and said, "cmsix and the other writers who emulate him". So, if 4041's claims are valid, then so is my, "don't like it, STFU and don't read it".

I'd also like some verification (from the grave I guess" that he " no intention of finishing" his stories and/or that anyone who has more than one story going at the same time is some sort of evil, conniving poopoo doodoo head.

docholladay

One of the problems in my opinion as a reader is the fact that the multi-dimensional and transfers are so difficult to pick the end point of a particular story.

My suggested solutions don't seem to have any effect. Namely pick a natural point of change such as the end of one season and the start of another season. Then if new material comes to mind just write a sequel avoiding the trap of just adding to the original story.

Not_a_ID

@Crumbly Writer

How do rising seas cause the land to rise? Rock and earth don't float (dirt does, but only below a certain quantity). I can see it now, the mountains in Alaska will be bobbing along in the waters covering the state. 'D


"Glacial Rebound" is a known thing, and can take a very long time to occur, as it involves miles of rock(which doesn't tend to move quickly). However, Antarctica is probably the only place on earth at present that would be likely to experience more than a few inches of change should its ice cover disappear.

After all, the Earth's crust does "float" above a molten mantle filled with magma. ;)

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Not_a_ID

@Dominions Son

Much of the land in the Northern half of North America is still rising from the melting of the ice sheets at the end of the last ice age.


Mostly around the Hudson Bay at this point, as that is the postulated cause of the "gravity anomaly" detected in that region. (It is slightly lower than the rest of the planet)

JohnBobMead

@Safe_Bet

Just a little background, based upon my fragile memory and things I've read others post.

cmsix had finished posting a number of those stories currently bearing the yellow stripe.

He decided to revise them, and rather than leaving them up and posting the revised version separately, he pulled them and started posting from the beginning.

This wouldn't have been a problem, except that his health took a serious turn for the worse, resulting in his being in a care facility with no computer/Internet access, so no posting, even if he'd been up to it.

Yes, some of them had never been completed, but a number of those currently incomplete, are because he pulled the complete versions prior to finishing posting the revised versions, and then his health prevented him from completing the revisions.

That's the lesson to take from this; don't pull the original version until after completing posting the revised version, if the changes are sweeping enought that you can't just replace existing chapters as you go.

Replies:   Ernest Bywater  REP
Crumbly Writer

@Safe_Bet

I'd also like some verification (from the grave I guess" that he " no intention of finishing" his stories and/or that anyone who has more than one story going at the same time is some sort of evil, conniving poopoo doodoo head.

Cmsix actually finished several of his titles, though his mainstay was to continually rework his one story, trying time after time to get it to work successfully, before losing interest and trying another angle on the same title.

The fear is, and one which I frequently fear myself, is that if authors emulate his writing style, they'll also emulate his 'try it until you grow bored' approach. It's not a guarantee a writer will quit, but it's not a good way to reassure nervous readers, either.

Crumbly Writer

@Not_a_ID

"Glacial Rebound" is a known thing, and can take a very long time to occur, as it involves miles of rock(which doesn't tend to move quickly). However, Antarctica is probably the only place on earth at present that would be likely to experience more than a few inches of change should its ice cover disappear.

Understood, but that hardly occurs within a single lifetime, most often taking tens of thousands of years to occur, so saying that "all the gains will likely to lost" is a bit misleading. One is a short term change, while the other is an eons-long change.

And I was referring to "floating on water". After all, technically, we're all "floating" in space, while many of us are floating on clouds of nirvana!

Ernest Bywater

@JohnBobMead


cmsix had finished posting a number of those stories currently bearing the yellow stripe.

He decided to revise them, and rather than leaving them up and posting the revised version separately, he pulled them and started posting from the beginning.


He pulled them to revise them to fold them into the one universe, and had major issues in doing that. He's now too ill to work on them.

Dominions Son

@Crumbly Writer

Understood, but that hardly occurs within a single lifetime,


Neither does sea level rise from melting glaciers.

Note: The current rate of sea level rise is around 2-3 mm per year, that's only about 1 foot per century, and it has been in that range since the 1800s.

Replies:   Ernest Bywater
Ernest Bywater

@Dominions Son

Note: The current rate of sea level rise is around 2-3 mm per year, that's only about 1 foot per century, and it has been in that range since the 1800s.


and it's still about 40 feet down from where it was about 500 years ago.

Replies:   Not_a_ID
Not_a_ID

@Ernest Bywater

and it's still about 40 feet down from where it was about 500 years ago.


Doubtful, the Little Ice Age wasn't even at its halfway point then. Some of those points you're referencing against likely experienced glacial rebound in the intervening centuries.

Now if we're discussing water levels circa 1000AD, or even a thousand years earlier, that's different. But once more, glacial rebound from the last major ice age is going to have screwed with things to varying degrees.

Replies:   Ernest Bywater
Ernest Bywater

@Not_a_ID

Doubtful, the Little Ice Age wasn't even at its halfway point then. Some of those points you're referencing against likely experienced glacial rebound in the intervening centuries.


The most clearly identified areas I know of are on the British isles, one is on the west coast of Northern Wales and the other is on the east coast in Southern England south of Dover. There are other examples of the sea level lowering around the world.

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son
Updated:

@Ernest Bywater


The most clearly identified areas I know of are on the British isles, one is on the west coast


Land can rise (or fall) for reasons other than glacial rebound.

New Orleans is sinking due to ground water extraction.

Venice is sinking from land subsidence due to compaction of the sediments on which it was built.

Land can get pushed up by tectonic forces and glaciers pushing the land down in one area can cause the land to bulge upward elsewhere.

Just because there is a water-line 40ft up a coastal cliff doesn't mean the ocean used to be 40 ft higher.

Perhaps sea level was 20ft higher and the land was 20ft lower.

Or perhaps it's just a high tide mark. The level difference between high and low tides varies over time and with changing geography. The difference between high and low tide in the bay of Fundy in Canada is 16.3 meters. The tides at Anchorage Alaska are 12.2 meters. It's possible that those areas in the British Isles you are thinking of used to experience more extreme tides than they do now.

Replies:   Ernest Bywater
Ernest Bywater

@Dominions Son

Just because there is a water-line 40ft up a coastal cliff doesn't mean the ocean used to be 40 ft higher.


It does when the drawings and plans for the castle show the gateway as being at sea level and what is now farmed fields was under water back then.

If the change at Harlech Castle is due to tectonic movement or other land rising over the last 600 years it would appear the entire UK land mass was affected by it evenly, which would make it unusually for such a major shift.

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son

@Ernest Bywater

It does when the drawings and plans for the castle show the gateway as being at sea level and what is now farmed fields was under water back then.


You should have led with that then.

It's not a likely candidate for such a large change over just a few centuries, but glacier related land elevation changes can effect very large areas relatively evenly.

Replies:   Ernest Bywater
Ernest Bywater

@Dominions Son

You should have led with that then.


In past threads where the climate change has come up I've mentioned three things fairly regularly, things the global warming hysteria proponents want to ignore. Harlech Castle, where Caesar landed south of Dover which is now well above sea level and well inland, and the great warm climate wine grapes that used to grow all over the UK 2000 years ago but it's now too cold for them. There are a few others, but those three are the easiest to check up on.

awnlee jawking

@Ernest Bywater

On the other hand, it used to be widely taught in Brit schools (don't know about nowadays) that the land bridge between Britain and Europe was flooded by water released by melting glaciers after the last ice age.

And yet the historic cinque ports are now well inland!

AJ

Geek of Ages

@Crumbly Writer

technically, we're all "floating" in space


No, we're not.

Replies:   Centaur
Dominions Son

@Ernest Bywater

One thing to check would be if sea ports/coastal castles on Mainland Europe of a similar age are also now further above sea level than indicated by historical records.

If not, that would be an indication that issues you point to on the British Isles are due to land rising rather than sea level drop.

REP

@BlacKnight

I generally consider that courtesy suspended when they're going off on other peoples'.


His rant was at authors in general who can't get it right, no posters here in Forum.

Maybe he will wear that key out. :)

REP

@Crumbly Writer

All that ice is holding the tectonic plate down.

REP

@JohnBobMead

I enjoyed the stories that CMSIX completed. You are right about him pulling and rewriting his nanoverse stories. However most of the stories with the yellow stripe are due to him posting a story with 1-2 chapters and then he never returned to them. He never pulled those stories.

REP

@Safe_Bet

Why he didn't finish his stories has been discussed in another thread. If I recall, most of the people who knew him said he couldn't get the story to go the way he wanted it to go and just dropped it.

Centaur

@Geek of Ages

yup and the earth is flat, google "flat earth movement"

Replies:   Geek of Ages
Geek of Ages

@Centaur

I'm well aware of the Flat Earth movement, and I know they're wrong. My statement still stands: the Earth is not "floating" in space. There is no medium giving the Earth buoyancy, and the Earth is not lazily sitting there or barely moving: it is spinning on an axis while that axis precesses while orbiting a star, hurling through the dark recesses of space.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@Geek of Ages

There is no medium giving the Earth buoyancy, and the Earth is not lazily sitting there or barely moving: it is spinning on an axis while that axis precesses while orbiting a star, hurling through the dark recesses of space.

If it weren't for the gravity of the Earth itself, we would all be 'floating in space', regardless of the Earth spinning on an axis. Since we're sitting on the Earth, which is sitting in space and doesn't feel the same gravity as we do, I think that by logical extension, we can say that we are, as residents of the Earth 'floating in space'.

Just because there's a pull on the Earth, locking it into an orbit doesn't cancel the sensation of floating, just as being in the Gulf Stream doesn't mean that someone lost at sea isn't 'floating' in the ocean. Those are separate forces, that which keeps you above the surface and that which pulls you in one direction or the other horizontally.

Replies:   Geek of Ages
Geek of Ages

@Crumbly Writer

No? Pretty much that entire description bears no resemblance to the actual physical reality. The Earth is not "sitting" in space, and we people do interact with the gravity of everything, because that's how gravity works. There's also no such thing as being "locked" into an orbit; do remember that the Moon's orbit precesses.

Also, if you're on the ocean, then you are floating because the water is providing buoyancy. The metaphor breaks down because space is not an ocean and does not act like it in any particular way.

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