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USA Equivalent of Marmite

awnlee jawking

Marmite is yeast extract, a 'waste' product that's supposedly healthy because of its vitamin content.

In the UK, the repeated strapline to its advertising campaigns is that people either love it or hate it.

Does the USA have any products with a love it/hate it strapline (apart from The Donald, obv.)?

AJ

gmontgomery

@awnlee jawking

Prune Juice.

Switch Blayde

@awnlee jawking

liver
brussel sprouts
beer

Dominions Son

Spam

Replies:   awnlee jawking
madnige
Updated:

I've got to give a link to this Marmite advert...

ETA: The 'either love it or hate it' appears as on-screen text at the end of the advert, but you might miss it because you're laughing too much

Crumbly Writer

Blonds
Jocks
Intellectuals
Politicians
Postmen (if you're a dog)

awnlee jawking

@Dominions Son

Judging by the suggestions so far, I failed to make my intentions clear. However I can imagine Spam being advertised with a love it/hate it strapline.

AJ

Replies:   Crumbly Writer  Not_a_ID
Crumbly Writer

@awnlee jawking

Judging by the suggestions so far, I failed to make my intentions clear. However I can imagine Spam being advertised with a love it/hate it strapline.

I can't imagine anything suggest thus far actually advertising that people don't like their product. Maybe bikini waxing? YEOUCH!

Not_a_ID

@awnlee jawking

Judging by the suggestions so far, I failed to make my intentions clear. However I can imagine Spam being advertised with a love it/hate it strapline.


Spam is the best contender I can think of at this time.

In the south-eastern United States "Potted Meat" (Which is a lot like Spam, just from a different part of the animal) is probably a close contender as well.

Gotta love the idea of reconstituted meat. No, not ground beef, reconstituted meat.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer  graybyrd
Crumbly Writer

@Not_a_ID

Gotta love the idea of reconstituted meat. No, not ground beef, reconstituted meat.

What do they reconstitute if from? Previously used meat (i.e. shit)? More likely, it's similar to hot dogs, some actual meat with the rest made up of ground-up bones, intestines, a few brains and eyeballs (all the rejects from normal butchery), not to mention the inevitable sawdust filler.

Replies:   Not_a_ID
Not_a_ID

@Crumbly Writer

The old form of it:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Potted_meat

Looks like the description is different than I remember.

The modern commercial form:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Potted_meat_food_product

A potted meat food product is a food preserved by canning and consisting of cooked meat product, seasoned, often puréed, minced, or ground, which is heat processed and sealed into cans. This is different from potted meat, an older noncommercial method of preserving meat.

Various meats, such as beef, pork, chicken, turkey and organ meats are used. It is produced internationally as a source of affordable meat. Its long shelf life and cooked state make it suitable for emergency food supplies, and for military and camping uses, although the high content of fat, and/or preservatives may make it unhealthy for regular consumption. The final product typically has a spreadable consistency, and typically contains high amounts of salt as a preservative.

Replies:   helmut_meukel
REP
Updated:

@awnlee jawking

Put me down as one of those people who hate Marmite.

I'm not aware of it having a strapline, but trying to think of an American product made me think of Scrapple. Just the thought of how it is made, turns me off.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scrapple

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Geek of Ages

@awnlee jawking

I don't know that I've ever heard of a "strapline". Is that British for "advertising slogan"?

Replies:   awnlee jawking
Crumbly Writer

@REP

I'm not aware of it having a strapline, but trying to think of an American product made me think of Scrapple. Just the thought of how it is made, turns me off.

How about mountain oysters, or even real oysters, as those draw a real visceral reaction from diners? They're either excited by it, or disgusted beyond description. No one faces them and says "Eh, I can take it or leave it."

Replies:   REP
REP

@Crumbly Writer

How about mountain oysters


Not that different from fried chicken liver.

helmut_meukel

@Not_a_ID

The modern commercial form:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Potted_meat_food_product


Similar:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mechanically_separated_meat

HM.

Replies:   awnlee jawking
awnlee jawking

@Geek of Ages

I thought it was advertising industry jargon for a slogan but if you've never heard of it, the term may be a British peculiarity.

AJ

awnlee jawking

@helmut_meukel

I sometimes think I'm missing something. Some people rail against mechanically recovered meat because it contains gristle etc, then they go out and buy shark gristle pills for their arthritis!

AJ

Replies:   helmut_meukel
graybyrd

@Not_a_ID

Gotta love the idea of reconstituted meat. No, not ground beef, reconstituted meat.


Then you just gotta love ... steam-blasted fleshy bits from the carcass, heads & beaks, legs & feet, skin... all congealed & compressed, spiced, breaded, deep-fried and served as ... MacNuggets!

helmut_meukel

@awnlee jawking

Some people rail against mechanically recovered meat because it contains gristle etc, [...]


I think we both know this meat is of inferior quality.
It's used e.g. for sausages without declaration. Any customer should know it's used in low price products, but without declaration it's often part of high price products too.
I want to know if and how much of those inferior quality "meat" is used, so I can decide.

I bet if the industry is forced to declare it in the list of ingredients, it's use in human food will dwindle.
No problem, they can still put it in dog and cat food.

HM.

Replies:   Wheezer  awnlee jawking
Wheezer

@helmut_meukel


I think we both know this meat is of inferior quality.

For a lot of people, this is all they can afford. Finding cheap bologna on sale for $0.79/lb. is a bonus. Their kids get sandwiches with meat on them for a change & a treat. Spam is actually too expensive for some people.

Replies:   helmut_meukel
imsly1
Updated:

I am not a Fan of spam.... or potted meats...or Viena sausages ....or Nutella...
And I damn sure don't like Diet Beer...

But I like sardines , anchovies, oysters ..

helmut_meukel
Updated:

@Wheezer


For a lot of people, this is all they can afford. Finding cheap bologna on sale for $0.79/lb. is a bonus. Their kids get sandwiches with meat on them for a change & a treat.


I don't have any problem with this.

But I do have a problem when this cheap meat is mixed into high priced products and sold as highest quality!

There are people in the UK who collect roadkill and eat it. (BTW, in Germany that would be regarded as poaching.)

One guy who does eat roadkill told the interviewer he started more than 20 years ago and he could easily afford to buy his roasts. He also said it gets harder to find suitable carcasses due to the increasing traffic. The dead animals are quickly overrolled by multiple cars.

HM.
(typo edited)

JimWar

In North Carolina some small parts of South Carolina, Virginia and Tennessee there is a product called Liver Mush and a similar product called Liver Pudding. These are made of pork livers and pork meat that is ground up and mixed with corn meal mush, various spices and then jelled into a brick. It is cut up and fried. I loved it when I was a kid and after being away from it can still tolerate it. My wife and kids, never having lived and grown up eating it cannot stand it. There used to be a saying around the outskirts of Charlotte that if you were poor enough you would eat every part of the pig except for the squeal. https://www.eater.com/2016/9/16/12921932/what-is-livermush-north-carolina

awnlee jawking

@helmut_meukel

I think we both know this meat is of inferior quality.


I'm still pondering that.

Mechanically-recovered meat is basically scrapings from the bones after all the 'good' cuts have been removed for joints and steaks etc. But what's left is mostly muscle, gristle, bone marrow and, unless my physiology is awry, little fat. I suspect in that form it's very nutritious.

However, processed meat manufacturers then add the excess fat, skin, unappealing offal (eg tripe etc) and convert the whole lot into a vile gray mush. Adding some colourant and binding agents, they get the pink gloop used to make cheap burgers etc.

So I don't think mechanically-recovered meat per se is poor quality, but by the time it reaches the consumer it invariably is.

AJ

Replies:   graybyrd
sejintenej

Expedition pemmican. 500 calories a bite

graybyrd

@awnlee jawking

Adding some colourant and binding agents, they get the pink gloop used to make cheap burgers etc.


And thus here in the U.S. it became known as "pink slime" ... and of course, the corporation lawyers threatened lawsuits claiming "defamation." May the lawyers, when they rot in hell, subsist on daily portions of raw, pink slime. Unseasoned.

Replies:   Wheezer
Ross at Play

@awnlee jawking

In the UK, the repeated strapline to its advertising campaigns is that people either love it or hate it.

They tried an advertising campaign like that in Australia. It didn't sell. Later on, they tried, "It tastes like vomit - but it's good for you." It still didn't sell: most Aussies thought, "No, thanks. I'll stick with our locally produced version of vomit."

Replies:   richardshagrin
richardshagrin

@Ross at Play

I'll stick with our locally produced version of vomit

Beer?

Replies:   Ross at Play
Ross at Play

@richardshagrin

Beer?

Why is American beer like having sex in a canoe?

Replies:   richardshagrin
richardshagrin

@Ross at Play

Why is American beer like having sex in a canoe?

AMERICAN BEER & CANOEING

Q: What do American beer and having sex in a canoe have in common?

A: They're both f**king close to water.

StarFleet Carl

You learn something new every day. We always called the insulated containers we got chow in Marmite cans. I looked them up online just now, and found out it Mermite.

Oh, and if you want something that's incredibly nasty, look no further than scrambled eggs and ham that were included in C-rations. That gives a whole new meaning to the Dr. Seuss book about green eggs and ham.

There are many foods in America that fit into the love it / hate it category, due to the regional variety in taste. Grits, hominy, black-eyed peas, Spam, any potted meat product. You want to try something special? Lutefisk. Look up the recipe for making it. You really do soak it in lye water, for days.

AmigaClone

@StarFleet Carl

We always called the insulated containers we got chow in Marmite cans.


In Brazil, containers used by workers to take their lunch to work in are often called Marmita

Wheezer

@graybyrd


And thus here in the U.S. it became known as "pink slime"


British chef, Jamie Oliver, is credited (blamed?) with exposing this product/industry practice to the general public. McDonalds supposedly quit using this crap a few years ago after Oliver's expose'

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@StarFleet Carl

You want to try something special? Lutefisk. Look up the recipe for making it. You really do soak it in lye water, for days.

I'm of Norwegian heritage (2nd generation removed), so I've eaten Lutefisk anytime I could find it. It used to be much more common, probably because I used to live in Manhattan where you can find ANYTHING.

Crumbly Writer
Updated:

@Wheezer


British chef, Jamie Oliver, is credited (blamed?) with exposing this product/industry practice to the general public. McDonalds supposedly quit using this crap a few years ago after Oliver's expose'


More likely, they just came up with a more appealing name for it.

Just think, our President eats this crap every single day because he's so paranoid that someone close to him (his wife or Vice President, maybe) is out to poison him, yet the White House doctor pronounced him "in wonderful health". By the way, he's obese, his cholesterol is through the roof, and his only exercise is walking from his bedroom upstairs to his office downstairs. Oh, and he only works three hours a day (significantly less than any president in history).

Replies:   imsly1  PotomacBob
imsly1

@Crumbly Writer

I guess golf iznt exercise ...

Replies:   Dominions Son  graybyrd
Dominions Son

@imsly1

I guess golf iznt exercise ...


Golf is a disease. :)

Replies:   richardshagrin
richardshagrin

@Dominions Son

Golf is a disease

Golf is Flog spelled backwards. (Sort of BDSM with special clubs.)

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son

@richardshagrin

Golf is Flog spelled backwards. (Sort of BDSM with special clubs.)


Speaking of, I've always been confused by why men would be attracted to sports that involve hitting balls with sticks. :)

StarFleetCarl

@Dominions Son

I've always been confused by why men would be attracted to sports that involve hitting balls with sticks.


It came from Scotland. Do we have to ask any other questions about it? (And of course, they had to call it golf because 'aw, shit', 'dammit', and 'fuck' were already taken.

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son

@StarFleetCarl

It came from Scotland.


Golf may have come from Scotland, but it's not the only sport that involves hitting balls with sticks.

Baseball, Cricket, Tennis (sort of), . . .

Ernest Bywater

@Dominions Son

Golf may have come from Scotland, but it's not the only sport that involves hitting balls with sticks.

Baseball, Cricket, Tennis (sort of), . . .


also sort of is Lacross, and a several other similar games that are thousands of years old.

Ernest Bywater

@Dominions Son

why men would be attracted to sports that involve hitting balls with sticks.


Most of it goes back thousands of years where they used the games as practice for smashing in the heads of their enemies with sticks.

PotomacBob

@Crumbly Writer

he only works three hours a day

Isn't that enough?

Replies:   Dominions Son
graybyrd

@imsly1

I guess golf iznt exercise ...


Golf is exercise if you walk and carry your own clubs. It really isn't exercise if electric golf carts carry your porkish posterior between holes; you have a cortege of SS agents to assist you with every move; and a detailed group of military "liaison" officers to carry the 'football,' communications gear, video recording and monitoring equipment, and the all-important Burger Basket in a heated compartment.

Dominions Son

@PotomacBob

Isn't that enough?


We would probably be better off if he worked less.

awnlee jawking

@Dominions Son

Golf may have come from Scotland, but it's not the only sport that involves hitting balls with sticks.

Baseball, Cricket, Tennis (sort of), . . .


But golf isn't a sport! Physical fitness is not a requirement.

AJ

Replies:   Capt. Zapp
Capt. Zapp

@awnlee jawking

But golf isn't a sport! Physical fitness is not a requirement.


And yet there are several different poker tournaments on the sports channels. At least with golf, you have to be able to walk short distances and swing a club!

awnlee jawking

@Capt. Zapp

Isn't there a current move to make Chess an Olympic 'sport'?

Time to get those finger weights out and start exercising in preparation ;)

AJ

Replies:   richardshagrin
richardshagrin

@awnlee jawking

sport

"sport
[spawrt, spohrt]
Spell Syllables
Synonyms Examples Word Origin
See more synonyms on Thesaurus.com
noun
1.
an athletic activity requiring skill or physical prowess and often of a competitive nature, as racing, baseball, tennis, golf, bowling, wrestling, boxing, hunting, fishing, etc.
2.
a particular form of this, especially in the out of doors.
3.
sports, (used with a singular verb) such athletic activities collectively:
Sports is important in my life.
4.
diversion; recreation; pleasant pastime.
5.
jest; fun; mirth; pleasantry:
What he said in sport was taken seriously.
6.
mockery; ridicule; derision:
They made sport of him.
7.
an object of derision; laughingstock.

adjective, Also, sports
16.
of, relating to, or used in sports or a particular sport:
sport fishing.
17.
suitable for outdoor or informal wear:
sport clothes.
verb (used without object)
18.
to amuse oneself with some pleasant pastime or recreation.
19.
to play, frolic, or gambol, as a child or an animal.
20.
to engage in some open-air or athletic pastime or sport.
21.
to trifle or treat lightly:
to sport with another's emotions.
22.
to mock, scoff, or tease:
to sport at suburban life.
23.
Botany. to mutate.
verb (used with object)
24.
to pass (time) in amusement or sport.
25.
to spend or squander lightly or recklessly (often followed by away).
26.
Informal. to wear, display, carry, etc., especially with ostentation; show off:
to sport a new mink coat.
27.
Archaic. to amuse (especially oneself).
Idioms
28.
sport one's oak. oak (def 5)."

Definition (1) says golf is an example of a sport.

Replies:   awnlee jawking
awnlee jawking

@richardshagrin

My dictionary requires physical exertion and skill ie not golf.

IIRC, sport is derived from a Greek term meaning war game. The original Olympic Games disciplines all involved useful skills in time of war. Possibly the only person today who thinks playing golf is useful in a time of war is TheDonald ;)

AJ

PS anyone else think Cirque du Steve ought to be Cirque de Steve?

sejintenej

@StarFleet Carl

Oh, and if you want something that's incredibly nasty, look no further than scrambled eggs and ham

I spent a couple of months living on pemmican (which is the stuff Scott took to the Antarctic) and nothing much else. Foul stuff but at least on Saturdays we got some curry powder to mix with it.

You want to try something special? Lutefisk. Look up the recipe for making it. You really do soak it in lye water, for days.

Look up how olives are prepared for eating - soak them in NaOH. Nasty stuff - several classmates had their coats and shirts burned off them in a accident..

sejintenej

@Capt. Zapp

Is golf a sport?

And yet there are several different poker tournaments on the sports channels. At least with golf, you have to be able to walk short distances and swing a club!

Short distances? what is 7000 yards in proper? and dragging a load of clubs. Apparently some people do that twice a day and get shouted at for being too slow. A word starting with Masochis comes to mind.

Also what harm has that little round thing done that the golfer tries to hit the bejesus out of it?

Replies:   Capt. Zapp
Dominions Son

At least with baseball and cricket, you are trying to hit someone else's balls with a stick.

Golf entails hitting your own balls with a stick. :)

Capt. Zapp

@sejintenej

Is golf a sport?

Short distances? what is 7000 yards in proper? and dragging a load of clubs. Apparently some people do that twice a day


I actually did that back when I played golf. It was a good way to spend the weekend while almost everybody I knew was on the town getting hammered. At not quite 4 miles or 6.4 kilometers, yes, I would call that a short distance. Many golfers these days don't 'drag a load of clubs' either, preferring to rent a golf cart. Using a motorized cart also significantly reduces the actual walked distance.

richardshagrin

@Capt. Zapp

Using a motorized cart

There was an option, between carrying the bag of clubs and riding in a golf-cart. You could get a small, two wheeled cart the golf bag fit in, and pulled it when moving along the golf course.

Geek of Ages

I think the people here who are claiming golf is not a sport probably have never actually played it seriously.

richardshagrin

If you can bet on it, it probably is a sport. Which means poker is a sport. And all the casino games.

Replies:   awnlee jawking
StarFleet Carl

@Capt. Zapp

several different poker tournaments on the sports channels


Considering the minor detail that the prize pool in the most recent WSOP main event was $67 MILLION, and the winner (Scott Blumstein - and no, I did NOT have to use Google to know his name, which should tell you something about what I watch on TV) won just over $8 MILLION ... that qualifies as a sport.

I play NLHE (No Limit Texas Hold-em) at a semi-pro level. I'm good, but not good enough (yet!) to make a living at it. I can last about two days when it comes to big tournaments. The main event is SEVEN (actually, ten, due to there being three starting days due to the sheer volume of entrants) DAYS of 12 hours a day.

Replies:   Capt. Zapp
Capt. Zapp

@StarFleet Carl

Considering the minor detail that the prize pool in the most recent WSOP main event was $67 MILLION, and the winner (Scott Blumstein - and no, I did NOT have to use Google to know his name, which should tell you something about what I watch on TV) won just over $8 MILLION ... that qualifies as a sport.


GAMBLING is NOT a sport. If the prize level determines an event's status as a sport, then the various lotteries should be considered sports as well.

Replies:   awnlee jawking
awnlee jawking

@richardshagrin

OMG, Pooh Sticks is a sport!

And raindrops trickling down a window pane!

AJ

Replies:   JohnBobMead
awnlee jawking

@Capt. Zapp

the various lotteries should be considered sports as well


The UK National Lottery uses paddles to hit the balls, so it's as much a sport as golf ;)

AJ

JohnBobMead

@awnlee jawking

OMG, Pooh Sticks is a sport!


I remember Pooh Sticks!

My sister and I played it when we went to visit our grandparents in Portland; they lived right across the street from West Moreland Park, so we would go to the park and play; it had a creek with many footbridges crossing it.

We generally used pine cones, there were enough lying around.

We'd drop them into the water from one side of the footbridge, then race to the other side to see which came out from under first. Over and over and over again.

We were young, and easily amused.

It's probably fifty years since we last did that. I hadn't thought about it in, well, probably fifty years.

Thank you for reminding me of this.

Ross at Play
Updated:

Okay all of you smart alecs insisting golf is not a sport, how do you explain the fact that age matters so much to performance at the highest levels?

A system of world rankings has been in place for 32 years. The break-down of ages for players ranked in the top 5 at the end of each year is:
30% : 21 to 30 years old
65% : 31 to 40 years old
5% : 41 or more years old
None have been older than 45!

Not_a_ID

@StarFleet Carl

Oh, and if you want something that's incredibly nasty, look no further than scrambled eggs and ham that were included in C-rations. That gives a whole new meaning to the Dr. Seuss book about green eggs and ham.


Thanks.

I'm now having flashbacks to a deployment where the mess cooks were serving green eggs and ham to the crew for a couple weeks.

awnlee jawking

@Ross at Play

Older guys have to stop more often to recycle all the beer they've drunk.

AJ

Replies:   Ross at Play
Ross at Play

@awnlee jawking

recycle all the beer they've drunk.

WTF???

Are you referring to Aussies? ... it being our Day and all that.
I know we may call it "piss" - but we DO NOT (literally) 'recycle' it! :(

Replies:   awnlee jawking
robberhands

@Ross at Play

A system of world rankings has been in place for 32 years. The break-down of ages for players ranked in the top 5 at the end of each year is:
30% : 21 to 30 years old
65% : 31 to 40 years old
5% : 41 or more years old
None have been older than 45!

Wow, 5% of the top-five golfers each year are 41 or older? That's marvel- ... wait a moment. 5% of five is 0.25. How does a quarter of a 41-year-old top golfer look like?

awnlee jawking

@robberhands

32 years x top 5 = 160 names. But many of the names will be duplicated, so there's a bad case of dependent data.

AJ

Replies:   Ross at Play
Ross at Play

@robberhands

So how would write what you know I meant?
I think 'at the end of each year' clearly specifies the top-5s from more than one year are included in the breakdown. That it includes all 32 years is only implied, but it seem obvious enough to me.

Replies:   robberhands
awnlee jawking

@Ross at Play

Australia has a day? I suppose with less than 200 countries in the world, even Australia merits one.

Of course an Australian's opinion on what constitutes a sport is bound to be biased - you lot think everybody is a sport, hence your universal greeting "G'day sport" - so it's no surprise you think every possible activity is also a sport, no matter that it's 'played' by obviously unfit obese people ;)

AJ

Replies:   Ross at Play
robberhands

@Ross at Play

So how would write what you know I meant?

Maybe I should have added a smiley somewhere but I thought you don't need them, you Bruce.

Replies:   Ross at Play
Ross at Play

@awnlee jawking

32 years x top 5 = 160 names. But many of the names will be duplicated, so there's a bad case of dependent data.

Thanks for stating the obvious, 160!
I don't think the analysis is flawed because of some names appearing many times. The point of the analysis is that many players are fixtures in the top 5 for many years during their twenties and thirties, but then, almost all drop down the rankings in their late-thirties (occasionally early-forties) never to get back into the top 5 again.

BTW, the ratings are based on recent performances. Only performances within the past two years are ever counted and reduced weightings applied to older scores mean results during the last 12 months typically contribute about 75% of their total points.

Replies:   awnlee jawking
Ross at Play

@robberhands

Maybe I should have added a smiley somewhere but I thought you don't need them, you Bruce.

That wouldn't work. Once Bruce escapes his cage, he's not going to be checking for any smilies.

Replies:   robberhands
Ross at Play

@awnlee jawking

so it's no surprise you think every possible activity is also a sport, no matter that it's 'played' by obviously unfit obese people ;)

... says the man from the country that invented televised snooker, darts, and tiddlywinks.

awnlee jawking

@Ross at Play

I don't think the analysis is flawed because of some names appearing many times.


What was your degree subject again? Climatology? ;)

There are other population biases that should be considered. For example, there are several golfers into their fifties who would still be competitive on the main tours, yet opt for the easier pickings of the lucrative seniors tours.

AJ

Replies:   Ross at Play
robberhands

@Ross at Play

Once Bruce escapes his cage, he's not going to be checking for any smilies.

Sounds reasonable, since it's unlikely an escaped Bruce will encounter any smileys; he'll rather be facing looks of disdain and disgust.

Ross at Play

@awnlee jawking

there are several golfers into their fifties who would still be competitive on the main tours

Nope. I challenge you to find any player who did not drop out of the top 100 in world rankings, never to return up again, before reaching the age of 50.

Replies:   awnlee jawking
awnlee jawking

@Ross at Play

Some major tournaments invite past winners to compete each year despite their world rankings etc. Most are just there to smile toothlessly at the crowds and accept tribute for past glories, but a few actually put in a good shift and finish well up the leaderboard.

I can't name names - I'm a sports fan so I don't follow golf ;)

AJ

Replies:   Ross at Play
AmigaClone

@StarFleet Carl

That gives a whole new meaning to the Dr. Seuss book about green eggs and ham.


I seem to recall having that as a meal on a flight once.

richardshagrin

I can get used to green eggs. I am not sure about green ham. Would that be mold?

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son

@richardshagrin

I am not sure about green ham. Would that be mold?


No. Green ham is a southern US term for an uncured ham, in other words, a fresh pork leg.

https://www.mrfood.com/Pork/Baked-Green-Ham-656

Ross at Play

@awnlee jawking

but a few actually put in a good shift and finish well up the leaderboard.

Tom Watson, at age 59, only lost The Open (often mispronounced as "British Open") in a playoff.
The following year Greg Norman, at age 59, led after 3 rounds and finished third.
Yes, older players can have occasional amazing weeks, but with very few exceptions, the frequency of players finishing anywhere near the top drops dramatically at around the age of forty.

sejintenej

@Capt. Zapp

Many golfers these days don't 'drag a load of clubs' either, preferring to rent a golf cart. Using a motorized cart also significantly reduces the actual walked distance.

Whilst partaking of luncheon yesterday we espied all the golfers forced to carry their bags - no trolleys, no carts.
Serve them right - sadistically hammering the bejesus out of those little innocent white things which had done them no harm.

Replies:   richardshagrin
richardshagrin

@sejintenej

little innocent white things which had done them no harm.

There are a few, probably very few, golf balls that are not white. I have not personally seen it, but I have been told there are some masochistic golfers who play when the golf course is covered with snow. They use orange colored golf balls to improve their chances of finding the ball.

Replies:   Capt. Zapp
Capt. Zapp

@richardshagrin

There are a few, probably very few, golf balls that are not white.


I have personally used white, green, orange, and fluorescent yellow golf balls.

There was another color available, but I just couldn't see myself whacking blue balls with a club.

Dominions Son

@Capt. Zapp

but I just couldn't see myself whacking blue balls with a club.


It doesn't matter what color your balls are, whacking them with a club is a bad idea. :)

awnlee jawking

@Capt. Zapp

There was another color available, but I just couldn't see myself whacking blue balls with a club.


SOL is probably a good place to look if you want a story about a Domme who does precisely that ;)

AJ

REP

Nutella is a hazelnut spread. It is used like Marmite.

Did anyone happen to read about the Nutella Riots in France?

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son

@REP

Nutella is a hazelnut spread. It is used like Marmite.


No, Nutella is a sugar/palm oil spread.

http://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/food/eat/reddit-image-claims-to-identify-exactly-what-ingredients-goes-into-a-jar-of-nutella/news-story/3bf3f47750cd1c72c5f43fad4e4d377f

Replies:   Ross at Play
Ross at Play

@Dominions Son

No, Nutella is a sugar/palm oil spread.

Yep, according to the limited information it was (presumably) required by law to supply to the USDA Nutrition Database.

I would call it what it REALLY IS: HEART ATTACK IN A JAR!

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