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Having a spelling mental block?

Switch Blayde

I just typed "bale" when I meant "bail." I knew it was wrong but I had a spelling mental block. If it happens to you, use Google to help. For example, in my situation I'd type into the Google search field:

bale vs


Goggle fills in the "bail" for me.

Replies:   awnlee jawking
awnlee jawking

@Switch Blayde

For example, in my situation I'd type into the Google search field:
bale vs


You're lucky it didn't come up with bale vs ronaldo ;)

AJ

robberhands

The online dictionary I primarily use does that already. Feeding 'bale' to it gave me:

'able, alec, alee, aloe, axle, babe, bail, bake, bald, balk, ball, balm, bane, bare, base, bate, bawl, bile, bleb, bled, blue, bole, brae, dale, gale, hale, kale, male, pale, rale, sale, tale, vale, wale, ahle, albe, alge, alle, aloe, aloë, alse, alte, bäh, bär, bake, bald, balg, ball, balz, base, blei, bleu, blue, gale, vale, yale'

Great, isn't it?

sunkuwan

I use Grammarly

Ernest Bywater

I cheat and let my editors abuse me if I miss it.

Replies:   robberhands
robberhands

@Ernest Bywater

I cheat and let my editors abuse me if I miss it.

That's not cheating, that's how it was meant to be by nature.

Crumbly Writer

@robberhands

The online dictionary I primarily use does that already. Feeding 'bale' to it gave me:

'able, alec, alee, aloe, axle, babe, bail, bake, bald, balk, ball, balm, bane, bare, base, bate, bawl, bile, bleb, bled, blue, bole, brae, dale, gale, hale, kale, male, pale, rale, sale, tale, vale, wale, ahle, albe, alge, alle, aloe, aloë, alse, alte, bäh, bär, bake, bald, balg, ball, balz, base, blei, bleu, blue, gale, vale, yale'

Great, isn't it?

It sounds like an online Rhyming dictionary.

awnlee jawking

@robberhands

Curious that there are mostly four-letter words, a few three-letter words, but no five letter words. After trying to work out their criteria, I would have expected eg baize and beige. :(

AJ

Ross at Play

@robberhands

The online dictionary I primarily use ... Great, isn't it?

Is it free? What is it?

Replies:   robberhands
robberhands
Updated:

@Ross at Play

Is it free? What is it?

Yes it is. It's Leo, a German/English dictionary.

Crumbly Writer

@awnlee jawking

Curious that there are mostly four-letter words, a few three-letter words, but no five letter words.

Terrific, a four-letter word rhyming online dictionary, so you can finally figure out how to rhyme "fuck an orange". 'D

robberhands

@awnlee jawking

After trying to work out their criteria, I would have expected eg baize and beige. :(

The criteria was 'Orthographisch ähnliche Wörter' (orthographic comparable words).

Perv Otaku

http://www.homophone.com/

Replies:   Ernest Bywater
awnlee jawking

@Crumbly Writer

how to rhyme "fuck an orange"


duck a l'orange?

AJ

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Ernest Bywater

@Perv Otaku

http://www.homophone.com/


the emergency help line for homophobic people.

Geek of Ages

@Crumbly Writer

how to rhyme "fuck an orange"


"Stuck in sporange".

richardshagrin

This is not terribly relevant to the discussion but it does involve spelling. There is a change in how some words are spelled. Mostly they are condensed, like soup. For example, Seattle becomes C attle. And because of the way residents of that city are treated by the exceptionally liberal/socialist/GLBT mayor/city counsel/administration the residents are treated like Cattle. A self fulfilling prophesy. The professional football team for the city is the SeaHawks, which becomes the Chawks or chalks. Which is brittle and breaks easily and is not very colorful. There is chalk in various colors, but each individual chalk comes in just one. I am sure there are other words that can be re-spelled to save letters that don't start with Sea. Maybe Beautiful should be B utiful. Needs to have a nice Butt.

Replies:   sejintenej
Crumbly Writer

@awnlee jawking

duck a l'orange?

Isn't that just an abbreviation of "Ducks L'[ove] oranges? After all, who do you think was fucking them in the first place?

sejintenej

@richardshagrin

This is not terribly relevant to the discussion but it does involve spelling. There is a change in how some words are spelled.

Spelling is also my problem. I used to be reasonably good at spelling UK English but with my current exposure to US English (and miccrap supply of a "wrong" dictionary)I can never remember if it should be "ise" or "ize".

Then we get the apparent misuse of established slang. The US uses "scotch" as a product from 3M. We use it to block something, to put an end to something, to wound but in America I understand that the verb means to apply sticky tape!!! (Scotch" is something entirely more valuable and desirable!)

There is one well regarded author (no names, no packdrill) who either uses words in an unsuitable context or uses the right word and (to me) misspells it. More he is not regular - chapter after chapter can be fine then it starts again with a weirdo in every screen of a chapter!

Switch Blayde
Updated:

@sejintenej

Scotch tape is a brand name for adhesive tape. But people refer to adhesive tape as scotch tape (like they call any cola "coke"). I once met the owner of a company that made Tuck tape and when I asked him if he had any scotch tape he got quite upset.

ETA: I used to write "towards" and "backwards" until I found out that's the British spelling. In the U.S., there is no "s". i automatically write it with the "s" and then delete the "s".

Crumbly Writer

@sejintenej

Spelling is also my problem. I used to be reasonably good at spelling UK English but with my current exposure to US English (and miccrap supply of a "wrong" dictionary)I can never remember if it should be "ise" or "ize".

Little known detail, in most word processors you can add dictionaries (helpful if you have a bunch of alien names that keep getting flagged) and you can switch them out when desired, thus you can specify a U.S. dictionary whenever writing a story set in America, and then revert to your standard UK dictionary when setting the story anywhere else in the world. (Just don't ask me the details, as all of my stories are set in the U.S.)

Joe Long
Updated:

@Switch Blayde


Scotch tape is a brand name for adhesive tape. But people refer to adhesive tape as scotch tape (like they call any cola "coke"). I once met the owner of a company that made Tuck tape and when I asked him if he had any scotch tape he got quite upset.

ETA: I used to write "towards" and "backwards" until I found out that's the British spelling. In the U.S., there is no "s". i automatically write it with the "s" and then delete the "s".


There are regional differences. Coke is a Southern thing, Pop in the Midwest, and Soda in the Northeast and Southwest.
http://images.huffingtonpost.com/2012-11-09-Screenshot20121109at3.05.00PM.png

I always say 'towards' and 'backwards' - also 'acrossed'

Replies:   Switch Blayde
Dominions Son

@Switch Blayde

I used to write "towards" and "backwards" until I found out that's the British spelling. In the U.S., there is no "s".


Add Forward to the list as well.

They can have the s, at least in some parts to the US.

I live in the upper mid-west (Wisconsin). In my neck of the woods, these words are used without the "s" to denote movement.

I walked forward.
I took a step backward.
I ran toward the fire.

However, they are sometimes used with the "s" to denote directional orientation.

I looked towards the horizon.
He was looking backwards.

Replies:   Switch Blayde
sejintenej

@Switch Blayde

Scotch tape is a brand name for adhesive tape. But people refer to adhesive tape as scotch tape (like they call any cola "coke").

Thanks. I had learned that (we call it "Sellotape" after the name of the manufacturer here) but I had never heard of or thought of scotch becoming a verb as in "to scotch a box"! One lives and learns!

Replies:   BlacKnight
Ernest Bywater

Down here we often use scotch as a term to mean you stopped something from happening or being done right. Thus John scotched Fred's plan to head up the new team. means he found a way to see Fred didn't get the job.

Switch Blayde

@Joe Long

There are regional differences. Coke is a Southern thing, Pop in the Midwest, and Soda in the Northeast and Southwest.


No one would call a 7-Up a coke, would they?

But, yeah, in NY a soft drink was a soda and in AZ it's a pop (I guess both for soda pop).

Replies:   Joe Long  Crumbly Writer
Switch Blayde

@Dominions Son

However, they are sometimes used with the "s" to denote directional orientation.


From what I read, that's not so (of course I'm not from that part of the country). From the Grammatist:

Toward and towards are equally acceptable forms of the word primarily meaning in the direction of. Other than the s at the end, there is no difference between them. Some people differentiate the two words in various ways, but these preferences are not borne out in the usage of most English speakers. Neither form is more formal or informal or more or less logical than the other (the Oxford English Dictionary says towards is more colloquial in British English, but we see no evidence that this is true in 21st-century British writing), so you're safe using the one that sounds better to you.

But while both these directional words are used in all varieties of English, toward is preferred in American and Canadian English, while towards is preferred in varieties of English from outside North America. These are not rules, however, and exceptions are easily found.

History

Toward is the older form. It comes from the Old English tóweard, which meant roughly the same as our modern toward.1 Towards is also old, however, as for many centuries the suffixes –ward and –wards have been more or less interchangeable and have given rise to parallel forms of many words—for example, backward and backwards, and forward and forwards.2 Towards became the dominant form in the 17th century and remained ascendant until the Americans took up toward in the 19th century.

This ngram, which graphs the use of toward and towards (as a percentage of all words used) in a large number of British books and periodicals published from 1800 to 2000, shows that the latter has been heavily favored through modern times, though toward might now be gaining ground.

And the next ngram shows the words' use in American books and periodicals from the same period. It shows that the transition from the now more British towards to the now more North American toward occurred around 1900.


Grammar Girl says the same thing in fewer words, and so does a site called write.com, but this site says something very important:

Whether you choose to spell the word with the "s" or without it, always make sure to consistently employ the same spelling.


What you said above would make it seem inconsistent (spell it with the "s" one time and without the "s" another time).

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son

@Switch Blayde

Yes, both mean direction of, I don't disagree with that.

What you said above would make it seem inconsistent


Not inconsistent as you seem to think.

In my area some people never use the "s", those who do use the "s" generally only use it with the "s" do so conditionally.

Yes, both mean "in the direction of". But for those in my area who use both spellings, without the "s" is used for motion "in the direction of" and with the "s" is used for facing/orientation "in the direction of".

Joe Long

@Switch Blayde

No one would call a 7-Up a coke, would they?


From what I understand, any soft drink down South is generically referred to as a 'Coke' Perhaps a hundred years ago Coke was the only one available, and the name stuck.

Crumbly Writer

@Switch Blayde

But, yeah, in NY a soft drink was a soda and in AZ it's a pop (I guess both for soda pop).

Both are holdovers from the days of 'soda jerks', which NO ONE uses anymore, so it's doubtful those terms will endure for long on their own (at least one would hope there's some rational to these things).

Crumbly Writer

@Joe Long

From what I understand, any soft drink down South is generically referred to as a 'Coke' Perhaps a hundred years ago Coke was the only one available, and the name stuck.

Other than NC, the origin of Pepsi, where it's practically an offense to utter the dreaded "C" word (the other "C" word is used all the time)!

Switch Blayde

@Joe Long

From what I understand, any soft drink down South is generically referred to as a 'Coke' Perhaps a hundred years ago Coke was the only one available, and the name stuck.


Ot maybe because Coca Cola is in Atlanta. :)

Capt. Zapp

@Crumbly Writer

Both are holdovers from the days of 'soda jerks', which NO ONE uses anymore


Actually, there are still places that use them. They are just very few and far between.

Dominions Son

@Crumbly Writer

Both are holdovers from the days of 'soda jerks', which NO ONE uses anymore


The use of soda is still very common in the upper mid-west.

Replies:   Joe Long  Crumbly Writer
Joe Long

@Dominions Son

The use of soda is still very common in the upper mid-west.


Where's it's called 'pop', but I believe he's talking about the person who sells it to you.

BlacKnight

@sejintenej

Thanks. I had learned that (we call it "Sellotape" after the name of the manufacturer here) but I had never heard of or thought of scotch becoming a verb as in "to scotch a box"! One lives and learns!


While we do call adhesive tape generically "scotch tape", in the same way we'll call any facial tissue, regardless of brand, "kleenex", or adhesive bandages "band-aids", I have never heard "scotch" used as a verb in that sense. Occasionally in the sense of putting an end to something, but never to mean "tape up".

sejintenej
Updated:

@BlacKnight


While we do call adhesive tape generically "scotch tape", in the same way we'll call any facial tissue, regardless of brand, "kleenex", or adhesive bandages "band-aids", I have never heard "scotch" used as a verb in that sense. Occasionally in the sense of putting an end to something, but never to mean "tape up".


Oh, what an opportunity this playing with words allows. The adhesive medical coverings** are called Elastoplast and not to be confused with the homophone supergroup which made a recording in an effort to help poverty in East Africa.
** a bandage is woven material - looks like cotton - and is several yards or metres long.

As a verb to put sticky tape on something weirded me out also.

PBS (US public broadcasting) is shown on TV over here; they recently showed (not shew!) a programme about the uses of words and this was just one of the many examples. I did check it with my UK dictionaries (which show just a few US uses)and decided it is just one of the differences.

Then this thread turned to the word "soda" but I decided that the addition of soda to whisky and (earlier in my lifetime) to the Catalan practice of diluting wine with soda for their children (which practice I actually liked) would have a strange reaction in the USA.

BlacKnight; nothing personal - this American / foreign amendment to our language intrigues me.

Crumbly Writer

@Dominions Son

The use of soda is still very common in the upper mid-west.

I accept that, but given the name derives from "soda jerk" (both were created at the same time), I'm hoping it'll eventually fad out of use. There's little evidence of it at the moment, though.

Replies:   Dominions Son
Crumbly Writer

@sejintenej

Then this thread turned to the word "soda" but I decided that the addition of soda to whisky and (earlier in my lifetime) to the Catalan practice of diluting wine with soda for their children (which practice I actually liked) would have a strange reaction in the USA.

We do that all the time too, not so much serving wine to kids, but my sister always dilutes her wine with ginger ale (and her champagne too). The women at church do it too (which is why they can drink so long without getting wasted).

helmut_meukel

@BlacKnight

(we call it "Sellotape" after the name of the manufacturer here) [...]

While we do call adhesive tape generically "scotch tape", in the same way we'll call any facial tissue, regardless of brand, "kleenex", or adhesive bandages "band-aids"


There is a legal problem here in Germany in using a brand name as generic name. In daily usage there is no problem but using the trademark in print without the ® or the ™ you'll hear from their lawers! If they don't fight the generic use, they will finally lose their trademark.
Filtertüten® (filter cones) vs Filterpapier, Kaffeefilter
Höhensonne® (sun-ray lamp)
Cellophan® [trademark until 2005]
Hansaplast® (named Elastoplast in UK and other countries) by Beiersdorf

I just found it's a similar problem in the US and UK.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Generic_trademark

In Germany publishers and authors get sued if they use the trademark without the ®.

HM.

Switch Blayde

@sejintenej

the addition of soda to whisky


In NY, soda means soda pop, but it also means "whiskey and soda" (which is seltzer).

In AZ, pop means soda pop and soda is seltzer which is mixed with whiskey.

Back to "scotch," I've never heard it used as a verb, but if it were, it would be: "I scotched him" which, I guess, would mean I filled him up with Scotch alcohol.

Replies:   REP
Switch Blayde

@helmut_meukel

using the trademark in print without the ® or the ™ you'll hear from their lawers!


In the U.S. in a novel, you don't need the TM. But you do need to capitalize the proper noun. They lose their trademark when the brand name is used without the capitalization and becomes an everyday word.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Dominions Son

@Crumbly Writer

I'm hoping it'll eventually fad out of use.


Why? It's a useful generic term for carbonated beverages.

Joe Long

@sejintenej

The adhesive medical coverings** are called Elastoplas


Sounds like an ace bandage (whether Ace makes it or not)

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son

@Joe Long

Sounds like an ace bandage


Ace bandages aren't necessarily adhesive.

Crumbly Writer

@helmut_meukel

There is a legal problem here in Germany in using a brand name as generic name. In daily usage there is no problem but using the trademark in print without the ® or the ™ you'll hear from their lawers! If they don't fight the generic use, they will finally lose their trademark.

While it's not based on law, in the U.S. the rule is, when you refer to the generic term, you use the lower case (ex: "Pass me a coke") whereas with the actual product, you capitalize it ("Give me a Coke, you damn sodajerk!").

While many companies will fight you to the bitter end, others (like Coca-Cola and Kleenex) don't fret about it, as long as you note the difference. But generally, I can't think of many products that lost their registered trademark by people misusing the name, however, they HAVE lost it when they accidentally copy a logo with the wrong dimensions.

Replies:   Switch Blayde
Crumbly Writer

@Switch Blayde

They lose their trademark when the brand name is used without the capitalization and becomes an everyday word.

Not true for either Coke or Kleenex, which continue with no problems despite virtually Everyone using the generic terms. The ONLY companies who've lost their trademark (like Aspirin) lost it to due to other factors (like Aspirin losing it by being on the losing side in WWII).

Switch Blayde

@Crumbly Writer

I can't think of many products that lost their registered trademark by people misusing the name


Tons of them. Off the top of my head:

thermos
aspirin
dry ice
zipper
escalator
...and more

REP

@Switch Blayde

I've never heard it used as a verb,


I've heard 'scotch' used as a verb often, but not in the context of to tape.

scotch
1. To put an abrupt end to: The prime minister scotched the rumors of her illness with a public appearance.

2. To injure so as to render harmless: "Would that the hour were come! We will not scotch, but kill" (George Gordon, Lord Byron).

3. Archaic To cut or score: "He scotched him and notched him like a carbonado" (William Shakespeare).

http://www.thefreedictionary.com/scotch

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