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Lotteries

awnlee jawking

Some years ago I wrote a novella (in response to a specific request) in which the protagonist had magical help in choosing lottery numbers in order to finance a specific project while flying under the radar.

In the UK, lottery winnings are tax free and small to medium prizes can be claimed at retail outlets without supplying identity. The protagonist won several medium-sized prizes with tickets bought and redeemed at retail outlets far and wide so as to avoid notice.

I have an idea for a story in which the protagonist successfully uses maths to predict the lottery, only cashing in prizes which do not require identification.

Would this scenario work outside the UK. In America, for example, is identity required to claim lesser prizes, and would there be any tax implications?

AJ

Ernest Bywater

@awnlee jawking

is identity required to claim lesser prizes, and would there be any tax implications?


Technically, you need ID to claim any prize in Australia, but you can usually get away with claiming anything under $100 at the local shop without ID, after that you have to go to the main Lottery office or have it paid to a bank account.

Replies:   awnlee jawking
sharkjcw

In North Carolina anything over $500.00 must be collected from the state lottery office.

Replies:   awnlee jawking
Ross at Play

@awnlee jawking

I have an idea for a story in which the protagonist successfully uses maths to predict the lottery

Have I got this right? I am the inspiration for your MC of this new story? ... or was it festering away in your mind before the last post you made using the word 'lottery'?

Replies:   awnlee jawking
awnlee jawking

@Ross at Play

No, I wrote the novella years ago. In an idle moment while Windows froze in order to swap virtual memory around, I thought it would be interesting to extend the concept of repeated wins but staying under the radar.

If Visa achieve their aims to enforcing a cashless society on us, the whole point becomes moot.

AJ

Replies:   Joe Long
awnlee jawking

@sharkjcw

Thank you. Do you have to show ID to collect the $500.00?

AJ

Replies:   sharkjcw
awnlee jawking

@Ernest Bywater

Ouch, that's awkward.

Something weird: although your response is the second post in this thread, when I first looked only sharkjcw and Ross had posted replies.

AJ

Replies:   Ernest Bywater
Joe Long

@awnlee jawking

If Visa achieve their aims to enforcing a cashless society on us


Visa? I thought it was the governments who don't want any money to go untaxed.

Replies:   awnlee jawking
awnlee jawking

@Joe Long

I thought it was the governments who don't want any money to go untaxed.


Yes and no. The current UK regime is making noises about cash-in-hand payments, but previous regimes have recognised the contribution made by the black economy.

Even if cash payments are banned, there will still be payment in kind. LETS schemes are based on the principle of tax-free payment in kind.

VISA has apparently been trialling a scheme in the USA whereby they bribe small retailers to go cashless.

AJ

REP

@awnlee jawking

Here in the US, there are a number of associations that conduct lottery operations. The most predominant of these associations appears to be the North American Association of State and Provincial Lotteries (NASPL) and it has both Canadian and US members. Each member conducts lottery operations within its regional boundaries.

http://www.naspl.org/nasplhistory

With each state controlling the manner in which their lottery is conducted, the rules vary regarding how much can be collected from a lottery vendor and whether ID is required to collect the winnings.

In California, a prize of $600 or more must be submitted to the CA Lottery Commission and personal information must be included on the claim form.

Wheezer
Updated:

The state of Kansas requires I.D. for tax purposes on winnings over $500 ($600?) but allows the winner to remain anonymous to the general public if they choose. Other states have different rules with some not allowing winners to remain anonymous. In any case, the IRS will know about substantial wins, and will take their money off the top, along with the state taking any state taxes, before the winner gets a dime.

Replies:   REP  awnlee jawking
Ernest Bywater

@awnlee jawking

Something weird: although your response is the second post in this thread, when I first looked only sharkjcw and Ross had posted replies.


That can happen with the way the servers propagate across the Internet. The server places the entries in order based on the timestamp in it, but if it takes a while to get from my system to the server a message submitted to the Internet after mine may get to the server first and be repeated around the Internet before mine arrives.

Often happens to me because of the electrons getting slowed down after getting waterlogged crossing under the Pacific Ocean in the cable. Also, it doesn't help now I bounce off an satellite to get to my ISP before it gets bounced around Australia prior to being pumped into the cable.

REP

@Wheezer

IRS will know about substantial wins, and will take their money off the top,


I don't know about other states but the CA Lottery only withholds and sends the IRS 25% of the payout amount. CA is also one of the states that doesn't tax lottery winnings.

Replies:   Wheezer
Switch Blayde

@awnlee jawking

Each state is different. And there are different taxes (Federal, State, and some places Local - e.g., NYC has a tax, so there you pay Fed, State, and City tax).

I think some states (or maybe all states) don't tax lottery winnings. I have no idea about city taxes. With Federal, every penny is taxed, but unless they know about it you can slip by and not claim it on your tax return. But if you get caught, you have to pay back taxes, interest, and penalties.

I don't know the amount where you have to show id. If you don't show id you can hide the winnings from the IRS. As I said, it's not legal to do so, but how would you be caught if your social security number isn't tied to the winnings?

awnlee jawking

@Wheezer

Thanks, but the protagonist would be more concerned about remaining anonymous from the lottery organisers. They wouldn't be very happy to discover that someone has discovered a way of winning regularly and, if the general public found out, it could destroy confidence in all lotteries.

AJ

Replies:   Ernest Bywater  Joe Long  REP
Ernest Bywater
Updated:

@awnlee jawking


Thanks, but the protagonist would be more concerned about remaining anonymous from the lottery organisers. They wouldn't be very happy to discover that someone has discovered a way of winning regularly and, if the general public found out, it could destroy confidence in all lotteries.


You could have him set up near where the borders of three or four states come together and he can play the lotteries in each states - but pick ones who don't have the same management group, so they won't know who the winners are in the other states.

Say he sets up in Fayetteville, Arkansas he can buy tickets in the Arkansas lotteries, a short drive to Tulsa, Oklahoma to buy tickets there, and a short drive to Branson, Missouri to buy their tickets, while Pittsburg, Kansas isn't too far away to hit their lotteries. Also, based in Morgantown, West Virginia puts him in easy range of Ohio, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Washington, D.C. Also, From Philadelphia he can buy in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Washington, D.C., and Virginia with ease, and even reach New York without too much trouble. From Memphis, Tennessee he can hit Arkansas, Mississippi, Alabama, Missouri, Kentucky as well. Lots of places like that.

typo edit

Replies:   Joe Long  REP
Joe Long

@awnlee jawking

From what I know anecdotally and what's been said here, I believe that generally any winnings under $500 will not be registered in the winners name. These are much more likely to be scratch-off games than picking numbers, but for the small amounts the winner simply brings the ticket to the store and the cashier gives them their winnings.

There are many small winners and in a good sized city a person would have a large market of lottery vendors to choose from.

Joe Long

@Ernest Bywater

You could have him set up near where the borders of three or four states come together and he can play the lotteries in each states


The Northeast Corridor is densely populated with several states within a close drive. Someone in New York City is right next door to New Jersey and Connecticut and less than a two hours drive to Pennsylvania or Massachusetts (depending on traffic!)

Replies:   Ernest Bywater
Ernest Bywater

@Joe Long

The Northeast Corridor is densely populated with several states within a close drive.


True, but check this for people sharing winner names:

http://www.naspl.org/regions

Region 1
Atlantic Lottery
Connecticut Lottery Corporation
Delaware State Lottery
Loto-Quebec
Maine State Lottery
Maryland Lottery and Gaming Control Agency
Massachusetts State Lottery Commission
New Hampshire Lottery Commission
New Jersey Division of State Lottery
New York State Gaming Commission
Rhode Island Lottery
The Pennsylvania Lottery
Vermont Lottery Commission

Replies:   Joe Long
REP

@awnlee jawking

They wouldn't be very happy to discover that someone has discovered a way of winning regularly and, if the general public found out, it could destroy confidence in all lotteries.


I addressed that general issue in Chapter 15 of my story Time Scope 2. Feel free to use anything I addressed if it helps.

Replies:   awnlee jawking
REP
Updated:

@Ernest Bywater


but pick ones who don't have the same management group, so they won't know who the winners are in the other states.


Won't work Ernie. There is only one lottery drawing for all states. The states control what happens as far as selling tickets and paying winnings within their states, but they work in conjunction with the commission that conducts the Lottery. The Power Ball Lottery is a good example. I don't know the name of the organization that runs that lottery, but for this discussion let's call it the commission.

The overall commission authorizes the US State Commissions to promote the lottery and sell tickets. Tickets are also sold in Canada and I think in other countries. In the US, the states control the specifics of ticket sales and the specifics of collecting winnings. The State lottery commissions turnover the money they collected from the sale of the tickets to the overall commission, and the commission returns the money to the states' commissions to pay the ticket sellers and winners. if one person were to win multiple major drawings, the commission would have the personal information the winner must submit on their claim form in order to collect their winnings.

Ross at Play

Better Call Saul!
There must be numerous lawyers and other assorted criminals willing to launder ill-gotten gains for a slice of the take.
Collecting money anonymously from a money tree shouldn't be a problem if he's not too greedy.

red61544

Awnlee, most states in the US have gone to mandatory direct deposit of lottery winnings over $1,000. The banks have to report any deposits over $10,000 to the federal government (to try to detect money laundering schemes). You would probably be better off having your main character win a foreign lottery such as the Irish Sweepstakes to completely avoid involvement with his own government.

Replies:   awnlee jawking  REP
awnlee jawking

@REP

I addressed that general issue in Chapter 15 of my story Time Scope 2.


So, to win the lottery a human needs an Altairian companion! Remind me, do Zldats consider themselves Altairian?

Was the 70% claim supposed to be accurate, or just to throw the Earth authorities off the scent?

AJ

Replies:   REP
awnlee jawking

@red61544

A big flaw in my story outline is how little you can do with cash. In the UK cash is no longer accepted on some transport systems, and buying and operating a car would be impossible too. I presume the USA is heading that way too.

So my putative protagonist would have to have a day job to 'launder' the money from the lottery winnings. :(

AJ

Replies:   red61544
red61544

@awnlee jawking

how little you can do with cash

In the states, the last thing that you ever want to do is attract the attention of the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). They are our tax collectors. Once you are on the radar, you remain there forever. You'd almost have to pick a country with no extradition treaty with the US and settle there with your winnings. However, you're writing fiction! That allows you a lot of leeway to ignore the IRS and write your story. Maybe the plot isn't entirely feasible, but would you want everything in the Harry Potter books to be completely realistic?

REP
Updated:

@awnlee jawking

No, No, and off the scent

ETA: Altairians come from Altar. Zyldats come from Minnus.

Replies:   awnlee jawking
REP

@red61544

You would probably be better off having your main character win a foreign lottery such as the Irish Sweepstakes to completely avoid involvement with his own government.


The IRS monitors foreign sweepstakes for US winners. They want their share right away.

Ernest Bywater

@awnlee jawking

I have an idea for a story in which the protagonist successfully uses maths to predict the lottery, only cashing in prizes which do not require identification.


Could that be converted to something akin to card counting to make regular moderate wins in a casino. The big corporate ones track regular winners and ban anyone they find card counting, but in the US you have the Indian casinos as well as the corporate ones. Then there's always the poker tournament circuit where they could win at the local and regional games but drop out early in the major competitions to minimise the limelight issues.

In both cases they'd have to track expenses and lodge tax returns as a professional gambler.

Replies:   awnlee jawking
Joe Long

@Ernest Bywater

True, but check this for people sharing winner names:


But if the winner is staying under the limit, as the original premise stated, then the winners names are never collected.

Wheezer

@REP

I don't know about other states but the CA Lottery only withholds and sends the IRS 25% of the payout amount. CA is also one of the states that doesn't tax lottery winnings.

I think the 25% is the standard amount the IRS takes up front everywhere. What you actually owe on April 15 may be another matter. Kansas is one of the states that taxes lottery winnings.

Replies:   Ernest Bywater
Ernest Bywater

@Wheezer

I think the 25% is the standard amount the IRS takes up front everywhere.


25% is the standard IRS withholding tax rate for any income paid out within the USA that's not related to a direct salary or wage. I know about this because I had to look into it when I had to sign some forms for the correct amount to withheld from my book royalties. If you don't fill in the proper paperwork they keep a much higher amount of 40% for some situations and 50% for others.

awnlee jawking

@REP

Thanks.

I was having difficulty reconciling the 70% with the two for two lottery wins ;)

AJ

awnlee jawking

@Ernest Bywater

In both cases they'd have to track expenses and lodge tax returns as a professional gambler.


That would ruin the concept of flying under the radar.

I've read or watched many fictional stories about gamblers who come up with a winning system, but the bottom line is always card-counting or fixed races or weighted lottery balls or position and speed calculations of roulette balls etc. I envisage a story in which the protagonist uses distributional maths and computer calculations, but computers are an anathema to casinos.

AJ

Ross at Play
Updated:

@awnlee jawking

the protagonist uses distributional maths and computer calculations

I once did a computer analysis of lottery results: I was doing non-work-related things while my bum was glued to my chair at work.
My hypothesis was it may be possible to infer the numbers others choose least often from the payouts being higher when they came up.
I saw no possibility of increasing the chances of whatever numbers I selected winning, but I did see a chance that if I got really lucky I would only share the prize pool with fewer than the average number of winners.

I can be quite good at finding devious ways to stack the odds in my favour. At one time the Social Club where I worked ran its own lottery to raise funds. It started off with the winner(s) needing all six numbers out of twenty. When it was not won, half the money collected would jackpot to the next week - and there would be one less number in the next draw. After eight weeks with no winner the accumulated prize pool was more than the cost of buying one ticket for every combination of six out of twelve numbers. That was going to cost me about $1,000, but I could only raise about half in ready cash. I found two others would understood the basics of the laws of probability. There were three winners that week, including us. The other winners got lucky. We bought about half of the tickets for that draw so the most likely number of other winners would have been only one, but we sill made over a 50% profit on our investment.
After complaints, the Social Club changed its rules so only six numbers could be selected on one ticket, and no longer every possible combination if more than six are selected.

Replies:   awnlee jawking
StarFleet Carl

@awnlee jawking

Would this scenario work outside the UK. In America, for example, is identity required to claim lesser prizes, and would there be any tax implications?


A lot of the thoughts that people give here where someone could live in one state and play the lottery in a neighboring state won't work, because many of those states don't have their own lotteries - instead, there is a mult-state lottery. Powerball and Mega-Millions are the two we have here in Oklahoma - which have a central authority.

What you could do is have them play the daily pick 3 or pick 4, but your top prize is only going to be a few hundred dollars. But the thing is, with your top prize, what you can also do is request anonymity, by having a lawyer claim the prize on behalf of a winning group or someone. We see that happen all the time with Powerball and Mega, since you're talking hundreds of millions of dollars.

Keep in mind that you can also take a cash payout instead of the annuity, which means you get less money up front, but does enable you to invest in something paying a better rate of return. For example, right now the Powerball Jackpot is $239 million, with $151 million cash value, and figure 30% either way for taxes.

That means if you take the annuity, figure you'll get $167 million over 30 years, or $105 million lump sum. I'd rather take the lump sum and invest it myself, but that's just me.

Keep in mind as well that the IRS (and yes, that does spell theirs) doesn't care HOW you make your money, so long as you pay taxes on it. It's easier to just report it and not go to jail for tax fraud. I run into something similar with my poker winnings, albeit we're not talking nearly those amounts of money.

From the Powerball site:

Each jurisdiction has its own law on winners remaining anonymous. Some jurisdictions are required by law to provide the winner's name, city of residence, game won and prize amount to any third party who requests the information. Other jurisdictions allow winners to create trusts to shield their names from the public, or otherwise claim prizes anonymously. Check with your lottery to see if photos are required and what its rules are on prize claims. Even if you keep your identity secret from the media and the public, you will have to be known to the lottery so officials can confirm you are eligible to play and win and for other legal requirements.

Replies:   awnlee jawking  REP
awnlee jawking

@Ross at Play

My hypothesis was it may be possible to infer the numbers others choose least often from the payouts being higher when they came up.


In the UK lottery, birthday numbers and multiples of 7 are the ones publicly proclaimed to be most often selected by gamblers.

As to your achievement in obtaining a positive return, didn't that once happen with one of the Australian lotteries, forcing the organisers to bring in a similar ticket-limitation rule?

AJ

Replies:   Ross at Play
awnlee jawking

@StarFleet Carl

What you could do is have them play the daily pick 3 or pick 4, but your top prize is only going to be a few hundred dollars.


That's quite a good suggestion, since 'a few hundred dollars' flies under the radar. Unfortunately the UK doesn't have such a game, and I suspect the format is quite rare outside North America (is that the married name of North Kardashian West after she marries Captain America?)

AJ

Ross at Play

@awnlee jawking

didn't that once happen with one of the Australian lotteries, forcing the organisers to bring in a similar ticket-limitation rule?

My first reaction was, "I very much doubt that. Lotteries only payout about 60% of total receipts. It would cost too much with most lotteries requiring six out of about 40 numbers, and if someone did manage to pull it off they'd probably just increase the number of numbers."
But after calculating the cost if there are 40 numbers (about four million tickets) which only about doubles for 45 numbers, I would be shocked if did NOT happen if the rules ever permitted it. Restricting the number of numbers on one ticket seems like the only response lottery organisers could make if (when) that did happen.
There certainly are, or have been, lotteries which jackpot the 'first division prize pool' when it isn't won. I once organised (while wasting time at work again) a lot of people to share in one ticket selecting many numbers when the jackpot became very large.

Ernest Bywater

@awnlee jawking

I envisage a story in which the protagonist uses distributional maths and computer calculations, but computers are an anathema to casinos.


If he's playing poker or any other card game and doing it all in his head the casinos are going to have a hard time proving what he's doing. If he makes constant major wins in the millions they'll end up accusing him and banning him, but if he comes about about or ten grand a head each weekend they'll likely not do much.

awnlee jawking

@Ernest Bywater

Unfortunately the chances of my writing an accurate poker story are slightly smaller than winning a lottery jackpot. :(

AJ

Replies:   StarFleet Carl
REP

@StarFleet Carl

Powerball and Mega-Millions are the two we have here in Oklahoma - which have a central authority.

In an earlier post to Ernest, I defined the way the lottery works using Power Ball as an example; I was partially wrong. While checking on something about the lottery, I came across something I was not aware of. I would provide a reference, but when I went back, I couldn't find the article I read.

According to the article, there is a single overall organization that controls a lottery such as Power Ball. The same organization may control all of the lotteries, or there may be individual organizations; I don't know. There are also State Lottery Commissions that run the lottery programs within the respective states.

The money received from all ticket sales within a state is collected by the respective State Lottery Commission. A portion of each ticket sale is paid to the overall organization and the money received by them is used for the Grand Prize, which the overall organization pays to the winner(s) regardless of the state in which the winner lives. This is true of all lotteries where the Grand Prize can be won by a person living in any state.

The remaining money collected from ticket sales belongs to the respective State Lottery Commission. That money is used by the State Lottery Commissions to pay the vendors who sell the tickets, the other costs of running their state lottery, and the winners of the lesser prizes. That would include scratchers and the lesser prizes of the Power Ball, Mega-Millions, Lotto, etc.

Harold Wilson

Here's an idea:

Instead of winning a shitload of small pots and worrying about how to collect on them, why not start a lottery consultancy?

You could mix in as much bullshit as you wanted, but basically, a client comes in, you do an analysis of his astrological sign, bumps on his head, penis size, palm lines, blood type, etc.

When done, you announce that things look good, and you feel that he could be a winner if he's willing to sign up. The catch? He has to sign a contract specifying the date of the lottery and the numbers, which gives 20% to you. (Nothing if the numbers don't win.)

Set up a scheme where you pick some proportion of losers, and then go into business. You start off buying a bunch of losers yourself, gradually start winning ($2, then $100, then $10,000, then win the big one) with the occasional miss, then when you get interviewed announce that you have a system.

Win a few more with your system, and announce that you're willing to help others for a piece of the action.

Replies:   awnlee jawking
sharkjcw

@awnlee jawking

yes, you have to show ID and fill out tax papers. The state and US GOV. want their tax money.

StarFleet Carl

@awnlee jawking

Unfortunately the chances of my writing an accurate poker story are slightly smaller than winning a lottery jackpot.


It'd be a shame if you asked someone on here who plays No Limit Texas Hold-em at a semi-professional level (meaning I haven't won, or for that matter, even cashed, in any major tournaments, but I do end up winning more each year than I lose) for advice.

Replies:   awnlee jawking
StarFleet Carl

@Ernest Bywater

f he's playing poker or any other card game and doing it all in his head the casinos are going to have a hard time proving what he's doing. If he makes constant major wins in the millions they'll end up accusing him and banning him, but if he comes about about or ten grand a head each weekend they'll likely not do much.


Playing blackjack - where you're playing against the casino - yeah, there will be issues.

But you're incorrect regarding poker, because the casino is a disinterested third party. The players sitting around the table aren't playing against the casino - they're playing against each other. All the casino does is provide the dealer and a place for people to play. They take their rake off each hand, or their 'dealer appreciation' from the entry fee on a tournament, and they don't care if a player wins or not.

And if you end up winning major tournaments - maybe even several of them - all you do is end up being compared to Stu Unger. Realistically if you simply played the WSOP Main event and made it to the final table, you'd end up with more than $1,000,000 each time you did so. (This years winner picked up over $8 million.) And picking up 10 bracelets for winning other events - great, you're the next Phil Hellmuth.

It'd actually be pretty easy to live in Vegas, work 4 - 6 hours per day, 5 days a week, going to different casinos each night to play in their daily tournaments or their cash games, and pick off the suckers. Couple of guys I regularly play with know people that do just that. And they make a fairly decent living doing so.

Replies:   awnlee jawking
awnlee jawking

@Harold Wilson

That sounds like a variant of the horse-race prediction scam that occasionally rears its head.

Unfortunately that's not 'my' story. I'm rather attached to the idea of someone 'breaking' the system.

AJ

Replies:   Harold Wilson
awnlee jawking

@StarFleet Carl

It'd be a shame if you asked...for advice.


I'm probably being thick but I don't understand that. Are you saying I should attempt a poker story with my zero knowledge without asking advice, or did you perhaps omit a negative?

AJ

Replies:   StarFleet Carl
awnlee jawking

@StarFleet Carl

The son of a former work colleague gave up his college degree course because he was making so much money playing on-line poker tournaments. He basically worked night-shifts so he could milk US players.

AJ

Replies:   StarFleet Carl
StarFleet Carl

@awnlee jawking

I'm probably being thick but I don't understand that. Are you saying I should attempt a poker story with my zero knowledge without asking advice, or did you perhaps omit a negative?


Trying to sound slightly sarcastic was all, which apparently didn't work. In this internet age, we tend to forget that sometimes the best thing to do is to ask a group that we associate with if someone else has actual knowledge of something.

In other words, hey, if you're concerned about writing a story about how poker is played, why not just make a post saying "Hey, I'd like to write a story about poker. Does anyone on here play regularly and well enough that they could help make it believable?"

You might get told told no ... and you might get told yes. Doesn't hurt to ask. (Oh, and in case you didn't figure out from the bit in the middle, that was me saying I'm a resource that if you want to send me an e-mail to figure out how to make poker believable, just ask.)

Replies:   awnlee jawking  Joe Long
StarFleet Carl

@awnlee jawking

The son of a former work colleague gave up his college degree course because he was making so much money playing on-line poker tournaments. He basically worked night-shifts so he could milk US players.


The whole 10,000 hour thing on professionalism comes into play here. Back when online poker wasn't as strictly regulated as it is now, I was doing something similar. My specialty was the $20 sit'n'go - you'd sign up for a tournament, 6 or 10 players, and once the table was full, the tournament would start. Out of every 10 games, I'd typically win 2 and cash in another 4.

The transition is when you switch to live poker. You can know all the odds, be able to calculate all the percentages in your head, but when you're playing face to face against someone else, that's when it gets challenging. Online you typically only have a short time (30 seconds or less) to respond. Playing live, the other player can go 'in the tank' and just sit for 3 or 4 minutes, plus you can actually see each other's faces and hands.

Casino Royale exaggerated it for the movie, but a tell can be a costly thing. (And the final hand in that movie game made no sense whatsoever from a poker perspective, but that's another discussion.)

awnlee jawking

@StarFleet Carl

which apparently didn't work.


Right, so I was being thick!

I'm a resource


Thanks, but I'll leave poker stories to people who have some experience. I've enjoyed reading a few here, despite not understanding the game.

AJ

Joe Long

@StarFleet Carl

if you're concerned about writing a story about how poker is played,


I had a chapter where my MC went with mom & dad to his grandparents house, where he ended up being invited to sit at the table in their penny poker game. (This was a thing at my grandparent's house). However, it's been decades since I've played and after a paragraph or two all my writing was about the dialogue and none about the game (which was just a pretext to get them together).

So yes, I would welcome a bit of editing from someone who know the games to be able to insert a few lines about the game into the conversations.

The same situation will occur in my next scene when the teens play Monopoly. It's about the conversations that take place, how it turns into a strip version and the reactions to that - but I'd like to have a certain amount of realistic description of the game as other play unfolds.

Replies:   awnlee jawking
awnlee jawking

@Joe Long

The same situation will occur in my next scene when the teens play Monopoly. It's about the conversations that take place, how it turns into a strip version and the reactions to that - but I'd like to have a certain amount of realistic description of the game as other play unfolds.


The UK street names, whether new or old, might discombobulate SOL's primarily US readership ;)

I wonder whether there's an Aussie version: "I've landed on the University of Wallamaroo!"

AJ

Dominions Son

@awnlee jawking

K street names, whether new or old, might discombobulate SOL's primarily US readership ;)


There are hundreds of specialized versions of monopoly these days. http://monopoly.wikia.com/wiki/List_of_Monopoly_Games_(Board)

As long as it's clear at the start that it's a UK version, we'll manage.

Replies:   awnlee jawking  Joe Long
awnlee jawking

@Dominions Son

There are hundreds of specialized versions of monopoly these days. http://monopoly.wikia.com/wiki/List_of_Monopoly_Games_(Board)


Thanks.

I wish that website listed property names :(

AJ

Ernest Bywater

I wish that website listed property names :(


check to see if you can read thme in the pictures

http://monopoly.wikia.com/wiki/Special:Images

Ross at Play

@awnlee jawking

I wonder whether there's an Aussie version: "I've landed on the University of Wallamaroo!"

My sister-in-law once worked at the University of Woollongong.
And Woolloomooloo is a well-known inner-city suburb of Sydney.

You don't feel so special now, do you Mississippi? :-)

Replies:   Joe Long
Joe Long

@Dominions Son

There are hundreds of specialized versions of monopoly these days.


I was looking at Strip Monopoly

Replies:   StarFleet Carl
Joe Long

@Ross at Play

You don't feel so special now, do you Mississippi?


Those are all aboriginal names. Despite the continent they originated on, they're foreign go our European trained ears.

In the American Indian language of western Pennsylvania, rivers and streams ended with -gany and -oning

Youghegany
Allegany
Mahoning
Quehamoning
etc

Many towns and townships ended up with native names. Conemaugh is prevalent in my area.

Replies:   Harold Wilson
Harold Wilson
Updated:

@awnlee jawking

Unfortunately that's not 'my' story. I'm rather attached to the idea of someone 'breaking' the system.


I'm not suggesting you change that part. But your question about winning small prizes and reporting rules and such makes it clear that you're trying to do it semi-anonymously. So I'm suggesting a way that would allow for bigger prizes, without coming to the attention of the authorities: have someone else win, but contractually owe you a share of any winnings. They get reported, you get paid.

Harold Wilson

@Joe Long

I've been to the Neshaminy mall in PA, and Hopatcong, Parsippany, and Piscataway in NJ.

The original Monopoly used Atlantic City, NJ street names because they sounded tame.

StarFleet Carl

@Joe Long

I was looking at Strip Monopoly


Many years ago, I used to have a computerized version of that. It went well passed the strip and included assorted sexual acts as well.

And a google search shows the rules for the game:
http://userpages.umbc.edu/~thuff1/monopoly.html

Replies:   Joe Long
Joe Long

@StarFleet Carl

Many years ago, I used to have a computerized version of that. It went well passed the strip and included assorted sexual acts as well.


Thanks, I'll bookmark that.

My premise is that the teens are alone for the afternoon, after school, while the parents are at work. There are three siblings - male 18 + his girlfriend, female 14 + her boyfriend, female 12. The game starts off as normal Monopoly but when one of two elder ones loses money they suggest stripping. The 12 year old says, "You guys are disgusting" and goes to her room (avoiding breaking any age rules)

After some clothes are lost it's then suggested that the first two to lose all their clothes have to make out. The 14yo doesn't want to make out with her brother or with her brother's girlfriend, and doesn't want her boyfriend with the girlfriend, so she gets emotional and heads to her room.

Her boyfriend follows. "If you didn't want to do that, why didn't you say something?" "I was waiting for you to say something." (typical woman) But she lets him cuddle "Don't you dare stick that thing anywhere unless I tell you" and she asks him about his past girlfriends, but eventually she relents and they have some nice slow, passionate lovemaking.

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