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Sexist sex story readers

Daydreamz
Updated:

I thought I'd share this with you guys. In the current chapter 9 of my latest little fantasy the schoolgirl goes to a party and is found in bed with two lads, by her serially promiscuous teacher. As we've known since Chapter 2 he sees her twice a week, slotting her in among his other students.

One reader has kindly, and politely, emailed me to tell me he's totally alienated by her immoral behaviour and isn't going to read any further! And judging by the dip in the scores he's not the only one.

Crumbly Writer

@Daydreamz

One reader has kindly, and politely, emailed me to tell me he's totally alienated by her immoral behaviour and isn't going to read any further! And judging by the dip in the scores he's not the only one.

Since the scoring indicates this is a broad response, maybe you should rethink your 'sexist' accusation. It sounds more likely that the readers didn't find the character's response 'in character', rather than thinking that 'girls don't behave that way'. After all, this is porn, and everyone knows that girls are going to mount anything that moves in pornography!

I'd suggest you go back and review both the chapter in question and the character, and see what the readers are seeing that you aren't. (And don't pay too much attention to what they say. I often find, readers will complain about one thing, but if you can get them to expound, another issue comes out, not-directly related to what they initially complained about. Typically, it's these other issues were are more essential than the ones they stated.

Good luck tracking down the issue.

Replies:   Daydreamz
Daydreamz

@Crumbly Writer

Well the story title is "If I told her to take her clothes off, she just would", and she holds the record for both the fastest and longest female orgasms, so I don't think we can say it's out of character! Haha.

I've had a reply from my reader and he admits to a double standard so it's case closed I think, for him. He wishes the teacher were faithful too, to be fair, so it's not really his kind of story, but still the promiscuous girl was worse for him than the promiscuous man and I think that's quite a common reaction.

It just struck me, with this being a sex story site, with those trends for sex-mad girls as you say, and her having that buildup :)

Anyway every comment is useful, and it guides me for how I have to work at what happens next.

Replies:   Joe_Bondi_Beach
anim8ed

Certain story types just seem to have lower scores over others. There will still be an audience for those types of stories and if they are well written should still be posted for those folks to enjoy.

Write what you enjoy and tag the story appropriately. Let the scores sort themselves out.

Switch Blayde

@anim8ed

Certain story types just seem to have lower scores over others.


The Black Knight once said cheating stories would get a lower score. Something about so many people having been cheated on so it hits home.

Replies:   Grant
Switch Blayde

@Daydreamz

he sees her twice a week, slotting her in among his other students.


Just curious. With the teacher, is it consensual or non-consensual? If the teacher was making her have sex, the reader would feel sorry for the innocent girl. But then if they find out she's sexually active on her own, that would burst that bubble.

Replies:   Daydreamz
Joe_Bondi_Beach

@anim8ed

Write what you enjoy and tag the story appropriately. Let the scores sort themselves out.


Exactly.

Joe_Bondi_Beach
Updated:

@Daydreamz


It just struck me, with this being a sex story site, with those trends for sex-mad girls as you say, and her having that buildup :)


Sure, who doesn't like a girl who will. No question. But this site has more than one male protagonist who seems to have one woman-family, friend, whoever-after another. "Tom's Diary," anyone? The "Summer Camp" stories (which include women behaving the same way)? Any number of "do-over" stories? EDIT: Meaning that the girls in those stories don't seem to suffer any bad press for their actions.

As you point out, it's this reader in particular, even if he isn't alone, but I'm not sure how much difference there is between the girl who has a lot of sex and the guy.

Replies:   Daydreamz
Daydreamz

@Switch Blayde

Oh it's all consensual and benign. Though she's a very innocent, hapless, dependent character and the man is the first-person protagonist and has had all the power so far.

Replies:   Switch Blayde
Daydreamz

@anim8ed

That's true, I've re-titled a cheating wife story several times trying to escape that kind of thing. This time though it's this one chapter that's had some down-voting.

Not the end of the world as you say and it helps now I understand why. Maybe the scores will pick up with my nice soppy ending :D

Daydreamz

@Joe_Bondi_Beach

I'd hazard a guess that more people than not would 'feel' there's a difference, but not for any good reason. My protagonist among them, of course...

My reader was especially emphatic about it, which was what struck me, though he was very reasonable in how he discussed it.

Switch Blayde

@Daydreamz

and the man is the first-person protagonist and has had all the power so far.


Aha. So if the reader relates to the teacher, he will feel the girl cheated on him. As I said in an earlier post, that's a turn-off for many on SOL.

Replies:   Daydreamz
Daydreamz

@Switch Blayde

Yeah I guess so. Two issues overlaid maybe. The fact that he's been enjoying two sisters in between the girl's visits gets passed over. Or allowed, perhaps. The guy is a lucky dog, the girl doing the same thing is a slut. That's quite a pervasive view of course. Men owning women, to one extent or another.

demonmaster62

@Daydreamz

I love the story. But, I have been in the teacher's shoes too many times. Nothing will be the same between him and Faye from this night forward. No one can glue it back to together. Again, I have been there. It is the ONLY realistic outcome. But, this is fantasy, so who knows?

Daydreamz

@demonmaster62

Oh great. Well please do tell me, at the end, how close I come to pulling it off. A+ to F :)

Replies:   demonmaster62
Crumbly Writer

@demonmaster62

I love the story. But, I have been in the teacher's shoes too many times.

That happens frequently. Each reader brings their own past into the story, and interprets the characters' actions through their own experiences. Thus they'll often read elements into the story based on details not included in the story.

Still, it makes sense to identify the issues, to determine whether it's likely to upset other readers (which this seemed to do, since it resulted in a score drop across the board).

Grant

@Switch Blayde

The Black Knight once said cheating stories would get a lower score. Something about so many people having been cheated on so it hits home.

Or the fact that it's a frequently used plot device; pretty much done to death IMHO. It takes something special for it to stand out from the crowd, for someone to take a different tack from all the previous stories based on cheating/revenge.

Replies:   Switch Blayde
Switch Blayde

@Grant

Or the fact that it's a frequently used plot device; pretty much done to death IMHO.


That's true for all plots.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer  Grant
Crumbly Writer

@Switch Blayde

That's true for all plots.

Only the annoying plots, and it's why turning established plots on their heads is such a popular writing technique.

Grant

@Switch Blayde

That's true for all plots.

Yep, but cheating/revenge seems to be the most used (abused?) one.

Replies:   Switch Blayde  anim8ed
Switch Blayde

@Grant

Yep, but cheating/revenge seems to be the most used (abused?) one.


As someone who loves revenge/get even stories, both as a reader and writer, it can never be overused. I saw "V for Vendetta" the other day. Great revenge story. And "The Count of Monte Cristo" is wonderful. I think I'll go watch "Death Wish" tonight. :)

Revenge/Get Even is one of my favorite genres. It's one of the themes of my novel and I even have a quote from Shakespeare in the beginning: "If you prick us do we not bleed? If you tickle us do we not laugh? If you poison us do we not die? And if you wrong us shall we not revenge?"

anim8ed

@Grant

Yep, but cheating/revenge seems to be the most used (abused?) one.


Because many write as an anger management / coping mechanism to deal with their personal situation. If you want over the top revenge read some of Dangerouslydead's material. In his profile he states it is anger management and he tosses out the most outrageous stories. Thank goodness it is mostly shorts that can be taken in small doses.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@anim8ed

I've never written a 'Revenge' story, but I'll toss in an occasional fight seen, and my characters always take matters into their own hands. What's more, those are always the most popular chapters of the entire story. Picked on, diminutive good guy kicks ass! Great plot device.

Replies:   richardshagrin
richardshagrin
Updated:

@Crumbly Writer

Victory is much more popular than defeat. (other parts of the body are more popular than de feet.)

Heroes play sports in fiction to get more victories. More often football (not soccer, American or Canadian or Australian football with the oblate spheroid) in coming of age stories on SOL, but sometimes rowing (crew), volleyball, swimming, track and field events, and lets not forget ice dancing (DoaL by Frank (ooops) Don Lockwood) which would be far shorter if they ran 100 yard dashes. Far more often than not its not the character building aspect of sports, its the thrill of victory.

We could try to think of sports that haven't been written about on SOL. Maybe competitive sailing?

I'd bet (a fairly small amount because I am cheap and poor) for every other sport in a coming of age story Football has been used more often.

Why is that? Is it the practicing and relationships with team members that adds necessary bulk to the story? I don't remember any stories about chess teams. Nerds are less attractive heroes? Why do I have to make the plural of hero with an "es" instead of an "s"? And in conclusion, members of the jury I plead not guilty.

Replies:   Grant  Crumbly Writer
Grant

@richardshagrin

I'd bet (a fairly small amount because I am cheap and poor) for every other sport in a coming of age story Football has been used more often.

Why is that?

Most of the authors are from the US, and they write about what they know.
There have been some exceptions- Playing the Game- Soccer, and The Defenceman- Ice hockey, and a few Golf based stories.
But the biggest sport in the US is American football (we tend to know it a Gridiron), followed by Baseball & Basketball. And people usually write about what they know, so I guess it's not surprising American football leads the pack, with Baseball & Basketball runners up, with other sports a long way back.

richardshagrin

@Grant

I am not sure what measure of popularity is best to measure what events are pack leaders. I suspect automobile racing may have the greatest attendance. Not so much for younger teens, but on an overall basis including fans of all ages auto racing events have extremely large crowds. Since race drivers tend to be older than high school age, and mostly older than college as it takes wealth to engage in racing even at a fairly low level its hard to put it into coming of age stories. It appears in Florida Friends, the early stories, as supplying metal parts to racing teams. One of the subplots to rlfj's Do-over story was his son's motorcycle racing. I guess that wouldn't be auto racing, lets say powered vehicle racing, as there is pick-up and other truck racing.

And there is Swarm Cycle fiction where a pickup is not a truck.

Replies:   Grant
Switch Blayde

@Grant

Most of the authors are from the US


Based on the spelling in the stories, I thought the majority of authors on sites like SOL and ASSTR were British or at least spelled Br English.

Replies:   richardshagrin  Grant
richardshagrin

@Switch Blayde

I suspect you notice what you aren't used to. And SOL is a Canadian site. However, based on population of Britain and selected "colonies" (former colonies in almost all cases) where Br English prevails and the United States of America, a substantial majority of all authors are US citizens or use US English as standard. Of course there are various geographic regional differences in how "American" is used, you all. I think its more like yawl when spoken. And in the Midwest (Ohio for sure) some speak like they are members of slow...talkers...of...America. Ok, we are talking about written English. Thanks to fairly uniform curriculums in public schools (the ones taxpayers pay for, that means something else in England) and that textbooks are cheaper if lots of states use the same ones. There may be some variation, but nearly all schools teach theater rather than theatre (unless its drama classes) and color rather than colour. And various style manuals also impose some uniformity.

Ernest Bywater

@Grant

Most of the authors are from the US, and they write about what they know.


This is true, but I'm an Aussie and only watched a few American Football games on TV or Youtube. However, I have used American Football as the sport played in a couple of games set in the USA for a number of reasons:

1. It's so prevalent in the USA and a core part of their school / education system.

2. The way they train and play and promote it leads itself to certain types of plot / sub-plot twists and usage.

3. The way the US school and students regard the AF players leads to easy drama events and saves an author trouble due to the many clichés and stereotypes involved that are very real.

Thus the hundreds of hours of research on the game for the stories where I use AF. I have others in progress with other sports, one is centred on high school basketball because I used to play, coach, and referee basketball.

Grant

@Switch Blayde

Based on the spelling in the stories, I thought the majority of authors on sites like SOL and ASSTR were British or at least spelled Br English.

Only a relatively small percentage of the stories I've read have used non US spelling, and they're generally done by Canadian or British authors with a few Australians here & there.

Grant

@richardshagrin

I am not sure what measure of popularity is best to measure what events are pack leaders. I suspect automobile racing may have the greatest attendance. Not so much for younger teens, but on an overall basis including fans of all ages auto racing events have extremely large crowds.

NASCAR for all of it's huge attendances, falls behind other sports as it is huge where it is popular, but it's popular only in a few regions. Other sports, while not having such huge attendances, have many more venues as well as much larger Pay TV audiences.

Various measures of popularity- number of participants, numbers of spectators, numbers of TV/ Net streaming viewers, amount of money generated, amount of money made by the teams, amount of money made by the players/drivers in the sport.

Crumbly Writer
Updated:

@richardshagrin


I'd bet (a fairly small amount because I am cheap and poor) for every other sport in a coming of age story Football has been used more often.

Why is that? Is it the practicing and relationships with team members that adds necessary bulk to the story? I don't remember any stories about chess teams.


I just finished the first draft of a story about A football player. Football plays a minor part in the story (no games are shown), but the story revolves around the college football selection process, and the comradery of macho types.

By the way, the good guy wins in the end, but that happens in all of my stories. Stories where the hero loses are depressing (and we were talking about Revenge stories).

Switch, Grant, I'm an American born writer who places all his stories in the U.S. (mostly because I'm not familiar enough with the everyday life in other countries). However, I've long used British spellings for certain words, mainly because I picked up much of my vocabulary from reading classical books written by European authors.

Replies:   Switch Blayde
Switch Blayde

@Crumbly Writer

However, I've long used British spellings for certain words,


I spell "theatre" the British way simply because I grew up in NYC and that's how it was spelled on Broadway.

demonmaster62

@Daydreamz

I find myself in the position of needing to offer an apology. I thought I knew where this story was going. You know what they say about assuming. I find myself square in the guise of the "ass". The more that the story evolves, the less likely my preconcieved outcome seems to be. I was taught to never jump the gun, so to speak, yet do it all too frequently. I allowed my experiences with my own "Faye" to cloud my judgement. I eagerly await each chapter of this story.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@demonmaster62

I find myself in the position of needing to offer an apology. I thought I knew where this story was going. You know what they say about assuming. The more that the story evolves, the less likely my preconcieved outcome seems to be. I was taught to never jump the gun, so to speak, yet do it all too frequently. I allowed my experiences with my own "Faye" to cloud my judgement. I eagerly await each chapter of this story.

That's what good stories are supposed to do. Under the guise of a simple story, they should challenge our assumptions and make us stop and consider our lives, seeing everyday events in new ways. Often, a simplistic plot is merely a lure to get us to lower our expectations, while the story digs its way into our brains.

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