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Email from SOL

red61544

I just received an email supposedly from SOL, subject: Main Email Address Confirmation for Storiesonline. Legitimate or not? Since I'm on here every day under the same email address, it seems strange.

Replies:   Ernest Bywater
Ernest Bywater

@red61544

If you've just posted an message to an author via the system it will seek confirmation of your email address. This process is different to the log on ID process.

Crumbly Writer

You get that whenever an author (in the past) requested "no autonomous email". However, now that Lazeez has done away with anonymous email, it'll likely ask each time you send a message (I haven't tried recently, instead using addresses from my address book).

docholladay

I have had that same email when its been a while since I wrote a writer using the SOL system. A bit of a hassle maybe, but one I can live with to help make the system work properly.

sejintenej
Updated:

I suspect red61544 was (rightly) afraid of a scam. I get emails like that regularly though there is a "something" about those from Lazeez which marks them legitimate.
Depending upon your reader check the "sent from" address; if it is not clearly OK try Googling the return address - I can often tie such messages up with a warning site message

Replies:   docholladay
docholladay

@sejintenej

You are right about the scam fear. And thanks for the method to check the safety of any similar messages.

Replies:   sejintenej
sejintenej

@docholladay

You are right about the scam fear. And thanks for the method to check the safety of any similar messages.

I ought to correct my previous message. Many of those messages I get come from what appear to legitimate companies but the address is marginally wrong (though you will not usually know that). However look at the address you are supposed to send an answer to; what appears on the screen will look pukka but hover the mouse over the link and a very different address will appear - that is the one to investigate.

There is a further twist to this. The true return address might actually be genuine BUT there could be instructions to on-send your reply.
Usual blurb; never ever give out any personal information, addresses, future/current holiday information/plans, passwords, account details etc. unless you originate the message (ie don't click a return link) and you know the recipient. Any suspicions, email the other party separately or, better, phone. If you are proposing to order something Google the company to check that the address on the advert is actually that of the company - I've seen that ruse tried too often

Replies:   Ernest Bywater
Ernest Bywater

@sejintenej

Many of those messages I get come from what appear to legitimate companies


First rule of emails that's over 20 years old, never click on a link within an email. If it's from an organisation you know, use your normal access method to reach them, not any email link. If it's a link about an item on the net your friend is sending you, check the site via a search engine and if good you type the url into the address bar yourself.

BTW if you have your mail client set to show mails as Plain text instead of html it shows the full url in the message and not the hotlink code.

Replies:   Not_a_ID
G Younger

If I do that how will I see my new hot Russian bride pictures?

Not_a_ID

@Ernest Bywater

First rule of emails that's over 20 years old, never click on a link within an email.


Well, unless the link was one you are expecting because you initiated that email being sent. Otherwise password recovery would be a bit difficult. :)

Replies:   docholladay
docholladay

@Not_a_ID

Well, unless the link was one you are expecting because you initiated that email being sent. Otherwise password recovery would be a bit difficult. :)


A good example of that is the verification email from SOL's mail servers. I found it always tells me when a verification is required. That tells me to check my email and look for the verification. The email verification includes a quick link for validation as well as a manual option.

Since I am notified ahead of time I look for that particular email then follow the validation procedure as needed. Its a known inbound validation email which includes links. Knowing the source I tend to trust it.

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