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Does anyone know a reputable/reliable quote source

Crumbly Writer

I've got a couple upcoming books which feature chapter quotes: quotes from famous literary figures at the head of each chapter/section head.

The problem is, I want to research the quotes I've found to ensure they're correct, but so far, I've been unable to find a reliable reference to use. There are SO many people posting graphics of 'famous' quotes (often misstated) that it's almost impossible to search for the original source of any single quote. Also, the majority of the quote references focus on old (18th and early 19th century) works, rather than any thing recent (i.e. anything since the 1970s).

Does anyone have any clue how to research that a given quote is authentic, or even where it originated?

Ross at Play

@Crumbly Writer

I suggest http://www.shmoop.com/quotes/ is worth a look.
I do not know how reliable it is, but sources are quoted, modern quotes are included, and it has various ways to search for something for a particular need.

awnlee jawking

@Crumbly Writer

You could try asking Lazlo Zalezac where he gets his quotes from. The Future of Miss Powers is overflowing with quotes, a plot artifice to demonstrate the protagonist's hyperintelligence.

AJ

REP

Try searching on -- popular quotes and sayings and phrases.

Bondi Beach

@Crumbly Writer

The problem is, I want to research the quotes I've found to ensure they're correct, but so far, I've been unable to find a reliable reference to use.


The traditional one is Roget's Thesaurus. Lexis/Nexis probably won't be much help for 18th and 19th century.

It'll be fun, although not quick, to scan through some Garrison Keillor "Writer's Almanac" episodes to see if he mentions any comprehensive and authoritative source.

And, even if it's very old-school, your friendly local librarian, especially if you have a library large enough to staff a reference desk, will know where to look.

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Replies:   JohnBobMead
jimh67
Updated:

The most reliable way is to get it wrong. Someone is sure to correct you. You get the correct information and a reader gets to feel superior. He or she will keep reading in order to catch your next screw-up. Downloads go up. Win win.

JohnBobMead

@Bondi Beach

The traditional one is Roget's Thesaurus.

Rather, Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, now in it's eighteenth edition (2012) There are other quotation collections out there, the larger libraries will generally have several of them. They all have their biases, in regard to what they include, based upon their editor's take on things. Some are organized chronologically, some by author, others by topic. Visiting a larger academic or public library to see what they have would be good, and checking to see what online resources they recommend would also be good.

Replies:   Bondi Beach
Bondi Beach

@JohnBobMead

Rather, Bartlett's Familiar Quotations, now in it's eighteenth edition (2012)


Oops! Thanks for that. I knew something wasn't quite right with my reference but couldn't figure out what.

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