Home « Forum « Author Hangout

Forum: Author Hangout

Frankenstein Bicentennial Writing Challenge

Bondi Beach

Especially tailored for all you zombie lovers ...

http://joe-bondi-beach-stories.tumblr.com/post/146415326941/nanowrimo-to-celebrate-the-200th-anniversary-of

bb

Replies:   awnlee jawking
Crumbly Writer

I'm not sure that humans 'create' zombies in the same way that Frankenstein created his monster. Generally, zombie apocalypses occur by accident (though in weaker stories, they sometimes blame in an terrorism, but that's an incredible stretch).

Replies:   Bondi Beach
Bondi Beach

@Crumbly Writer

I'm not sure that humans 'create' zombies in the same way that Frankenstein created his monster. Generally, zombie apocalypses occur by accident (though in weaker stories, they sometimes blame in an terrorism, but that's an incredible stretch).


The "zombies" reference was kind of a joke. My bad.

In fact, the challengers make it explicit that the "monster" can be almost anything (a piece of art, some architecture, software code (?), a laundry folder (oh, wait, Stephen King already did that one), or, of course, a creature.

The challenge is to explore the relationship between the monster and the creator.

bb

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son

@Bondi Beach

Yeah, but no sex stories.

And here I had an idea for a female mad scientist creating an anthropomorphic wolf to terrorize people only to have it be more interest in breeding her than causing mayhem.

Replies:   Bondi Beach
Bondi Beach

@Dominions Son

Yeah, but no sex stories.


Wait a minute. Who says? The Medium Web site where you post your story says, "No Porn," but I don't write porn so I wouldn't let that stop me from telling the compelling tale of an horny anthropomorphic wolf. I mean, what's not to like?

Joking aside, I figure I'd let them throw it out if they wanted to. They do say no kids, but we already know that.

Is the wolf handsome? I should hope so.

bb

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son

@Bondi Beach

but I don't write porn so I wouldn't let that stop me from telling the compelling tale of an horny anthropomorphic wolf. I mean, what's not to like?


My idea just wouldn't be complete without the final sex scene where the mad scentess gets it in the "end". :)

Replies:   Bondi Beach
Bondi Beach
Updated:

@Dominions Son


My idea just wouldn't be complete without the final sex scene where the mad scentess gets it in the "end". :)


Not quite sure what a "scentess" is, perhaps the wolf knows, but if you make it artistic, it doesn't matter who does what to whom (or what) wherever. Go for it.

Besides, doesn't it turn out to be true love? More of an updated "Romeo and Juliet" than "Frankenstein"? Happy endings are always welcome, in whatever form they come to us and without regard to how they are clothed.

EDIT TO ADD: That's it! Re-tell "Romeo and Juliet" as "Frankenstein"! Can't lose. (Hell---add zombies, if needed.)

bb

Dominions Son

@Bondi Beach

Not quite sure what a "scentess"


It was supposed to be scientess (a female scientist) as in sorcerer / sorceress.

Besides, doesn't it turn out to be true love?


For the wolfman maybe, for the scientess it would be closer to rape.

Crumbly Writer

@Bondi Beach

That's it! Re-tell "Romeo and Juliet" as "Frankenstein"! Can't lose. (Hell---add zombies, if needed.)

What incorporates 'forbidden love' more than Frankenstein and the Werewolf (even more forbidden if it's a gay romance) or between the living and a zombie (though I haven't seen many zombies with working male and female parts, though I have seen an excellent Romantic Zombie movie, that I loved).

awnlee jawking

@Bondi Beach

US residents only, so not quite all.

AJ

Bondi Beach

@awnlee jawking

US residents only, so not quite all.


Oh hell. Missed that. Screw'em.

bb

Crumbly Writer

@awnlee jawking

US residents only, so not quite all.

Only those in the U.S. are allowed to create monsters which terrorize other nations (like we did with our uranium production which originally produced Godzilla in Japan).

Replies:   REP
REP

@Crumbly Writer

our uranium production which originally produced Godzilla in Japan

Oh my God! Where have I been! I didn't know we created Godzilla. I thought it was just a monster in stasis and our nuke tests woke it up. That evolution must have been at light speed. What was it originally, a salt water crocodile?

Crumbly Writer

@REP

Oh my God! Where have I been! I didn't know we created Godzilla. I thought it was just a monster in stasis and our nuke tests woke it up.

Ha-ha. I always thought it was an incredibly weak premise, but that was what we were expected to believe, that our using nuclear energy would create monsters! But then, low and behold, Japan eventually uses more nuclear energy (per square foot of space, of course) than anywhere else on earth.

Of course, if he was a prehistoric creature woken up, then why was he so sensitive to uranium exposure in the first place? Whether he 'evolved' his response in the 50s, or 100,000 years ago, it still would have been much too fast for evolutionary development.

Dominions Son

@REP

I didn't know we created Godzilla. I thought it was just a monster in stasis and our nuke tests woke it up.


There are almost as many different origins for Godzilla as there are Godzilla movies.

IIRC: the origin from the original Godzilla movie made him out to be a Surviving T-Rex or other carnivorous dinosaur that was then mutated by radioactive fallout from the US atomic testing at Bikini Atoll.

Replies:   REP
REP

@Dominions Son

a Surviving T-Rex or other carnivorous dinosaur

And we just accepted that an air breathing dinosaur could live under water! Maybe that is why Hollywood script writers produce movies that only a gullible person might believe.

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son

@REP

And we just accepted that an air breathing dinosaur could live under water! Maybe that is why Hollywood script writers produce movies that only a gullible person might believe.


1. It was living on an island, not underwater.

2. The original Godzilla (a misspelling of a transliteration, it should have been Gojira) was made in Japan by a Japanese producer and studio, it was very much Not a Hollywood production.

3. Arron Burr was spliced in as an US reporter to provide English narration for the US release only.

Replies:   REP
REP

@Dominions Son

The original must have preceded the version I first saw. Although I do have a vague recollection of Arron Burr as a reporter in the movie. Maybe I just forgot the opening scenes.

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son
Updated:

@REP


The original must have preceded the version I first saw.


Of course it did. The Arron Burr version is the original with a few scenes removed in order to splice Arron Burr in. He was added only for the US release. As I recall, they didn't bother dubbing over the Japanese dialog or subtitling it. They just stuck Burr in as a narrator.

It wasn't until a couple of decades later that a subtitled version of the original as it was shown in Japan was made available in the US, but it never did receive wide distribution. If I remember correctly, the backstory of the creatures origin is mentioned briefly but not fully fleshed out.

It does get fleshed out in the second or third Japanese movie done by the original creator of Godzilla where they show WWII Japanese military expedition to an isolated island near Bikini Atoll where they encounter the creature before it is mutated by the atomic testing.

This origin is held to in Most of the movies done by their original creator. It's the more recent Japanese movies where they get into alternate origins. And of course, both of the Hollywood versions have different origins not just from the Japanese movies, but from each other.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer
Updated:

@Dominions Son


And of course, both of the Hollywood versions have different origins not just from the Japanese movies, but from each other.


Sorry, but those aren't new versions, those are "reinventions" of the story, starting from an entirely new perspective and modifying the plot substantially to end up at a completely different point. It's akin to rewriting "Romeo and Juliet" so Juliet cut Romeo off at the knees and declares her intent to run off with her lesbian lover instead.

If you intend to write an entirely new story, at least have the decency to write an entirely new story, rather than trying to abscond with another author's acknowledged masterpiece for your own devices!

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son

@Crumbly Writer

Sorry, but those aren't new versions, those are "reinventions" of the story


Where exactly did I claim that they were new as opposed to reinventions?

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@Dominions Son

Where exactly did I claim that they were new as opposed to reinventions?

You specified that they were new "versions" of the original work. I was objecting to your use of "versions", since they're not true to the original author's intent. I've got no problem with reinventing stories, but I object to claims they're 'retelling' the original story, as they're simply not. That's simply a cop-out method of stealing the original work's readers thru false advertising.

Each generation reinvents the work of previous generations, but if I hear one more movie hawked as the newest iteration of Shakespeare's works, I'll throw up. They're clearly not Shakespeare, and shouldn't be promoted as such. There's nothing wrong with promoting your own work for it's own merits.

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son
Updated:

@Crumbly Writer


You specified that they were new "versions" of the original work.


No, I did not say they were new "versions". I said they were Hollywood "versions", as in Hollywood's take on a story that originated in Japan.

Replies:   Dominions Son
Dominions Son

@Dominions Son

I've got no problem with reinventing stories, but I object to claims they're 'retelling' the original story, as they're simply not. That's simply a cop-out method of stealing the original work's readers thru false advertising.


Okay, you don't like that, but Hollywood does that, claim they are retelling an old story when they are really reinventing it, all the time.

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@Dominions Son

Okay, you don't like that, but Hollywood does that, claim they are retelling an old story when they are really reinventing it, all the time.

Yeah, it's a pet-peeve of mine, but that's my cross to bear. I trust that everyone understands what's implied. I don't really want to belabor the point.

Back to Top