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SOLwhack

awnlee jawking

Proposed definition: a genuine English word which, in all the stories on SOL, only occurs once.

AJ

richardshagrin

@awnlee jawking

antidisestablishmentarianism. It may not have occurred even once.

Replies:   Dominions Son  Lugh  Lugh  Lugh
Dominions Son

@richardshagrin

Silly reader, whacks are for moles. :)

Replies:   richardshagrin
richardshagrin

@Dominions Son

Quacks are for ducks.

Replies:   Dominions Son
Lugh

@richardshagrin

I can even use antidisestablishmentariasm in its Massachusetts context.

Lugh

@richardshagrin

I can even use antidisestablishmentariasm in its Massachusetts context.

Lugh

@richardshagrin

I can even use antidisestablishmentariasm in its Massachusetts context.

Replies:   richardshagrin
richardshagrin

@Lugh

What you tell me three times must be true.

Dominions Son

On a more serious note: a few more that have probably never been used.

Pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis: Longest word in a major dictionary.

Hippopotomonstrosesquipedaliophobia: Longest word ending in phobia.

Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious: See Poppins, Mary.

Pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism: longest non-coined word in a major dictionary.

Floccinaucinihilipilification: Longest unchallenged non-technical word.

Honorificabilitudinitatibus: Longest word in Shakespeare's works; longest word in the English language featuring alternating consonants and vowels

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Longest_word_in_English

Be glad I left off the absolute king longest English word, the chemical name for titin (the largest known protein) which would by itself, not even in a single sentence take 3.27 SOL story pages to write out.

Ernest Bywater

@awnlee jawking

isn't a SOLwhack what many people reading the stroke stories end up doing?

Replies:   awnlee jawking
richardshagrin

@Dominions Son

Thank you for leaving out chemical names. I am not sure chemistry is "English" in the sense of being used only by English speakers. Do native French, German, Chinese or other language speakers use the same chemical names, as I suspect. There are mathematical statements that are not really English in the sense that only persons brought up to speak their homes' languages would use them in a sentence. While "E equals M times C squared" is English, I suspect "E=Mc(superscript) 2" is not. My keyboard does not have the capability to type the numbers c squared, another reason I doubt it is an English word or term. Perhaps school children would be happy to learn they know foreign languages when they know chemistry and math. It might explain some of the difficulty learning them.

Dominions Son

@richardshagrin

Quacks are for ducks.


Kicks are for Trids.

samuelmichaels

@Dominions Son

Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious: See Poppins, Mary.


That's the only one from your list I found (well, the advanced search found) on SOL. But, alas, it was used 9 times, so doesn't qualify.

Replies:   awnlee jawking
awnlee jawking
Updated:

@samuelmichaels

The idea occurred to me while I was writing a fun piece. I used an unusual word. My first thought was 'What a pretentious twat I am, I bet no-one else has used that word.' SOLwhack was my second thought.

I've been using Google's site search on the assumption that it won't impact SOL's bandwidth, even though the results may not be accurate because google may not index every story.

I was wrong. Three stories contain the word I used. The second word I tested threw up two occurrences, both in blogs rather than stories. 'Ecumenical' was third time lucky. Please don't all rush to use it, it's rare for a reason :)

AJ

awnlee jawking

@Ernest Bywater

isn't a SOLwhack what many people reading the stroke stories end up doing?


Echoing another thread, if this were social media, my response would be a smiley.

AJ

Replies:   Crumbly Writer
Crumbly Writer

@awnlee jawking

Echoing another thread, if this were social media, my response would be a smiley.

:)

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